Gregory Marchildon, University of ReginaJennifer Verma, CHSRFDavid Secko, Concordia University          Annual CAHSPR Conf...
   Introduce EvidenceNetwork.ca   Writing a Snappy OpEd   OpEds as a KT vehicle   What are OpEd editors looking for? ...
2
   Links journalists with health policy    experts to provide access to    credible, evidence-based information.         ...
   To get your research ―out‖   To set the record straight   To counter a growing ―belief‖ that is not    based on, or ...
   ―Opposite the Editorial Pages‖ (OpEd)   Key Perimeters:    ◦ Focus on a single or few major points/arguments    ◦ Suc...
THE LATEST RESEARCH SHOWS THATWE REALLY SHOULD DO SOMETHING     WITH ALL THIS RESEARCH                                 6
Knowledge translation is about:   Making users aware of knowledge and facilitating    their use of it to improve health a...
Knowledge Translation is something that mostresearchers are already doing, to some extent.Researchers who: publish their ...
   Consistent evidence of failure to translate research    findings into clinical practice:    • 30-45% patients do not g...
A broad spectrum of activities including: Diffusion (let it happen)   Dissemination (help it happen)    ◦ activities tha...
Some filters that editors use when considering   opinion:1.  Can the writer claim expertise on the topic?2.  Is the argume...
   Multimediality, inte    ractivity and    hypertextuality   Blended journalism   Editorial Staff   Authority   Spee...
13
   Connect with news media that report on health    (e.g., Globe and Mail, Hamilton Spectator) and    publish analyses, o...
   Form a team > Pick a theme (4)   Review materials (news article, Mythbusters)   Develop key points for an OpEd   Re...
Aging Population and itsPotential ImpactHealthcare Costs andSpending                   Private, For-Profit Solutions      ...
17
 News: ―Explore all funding options for health  care, says outgoing CMA head‖ (Postmedia News, Aug 12, 2011)  http://www....
19
20
21
22
   What central focus will your OpEd take?    ◦ Is it topical? Does it offer a new angle? How might      you open and clo...
   What central focus will your OpEd take?    ◦ Is it topical? Does it offer a new angle? How might      you open and clo...
   What central focus did they take?    ◦ Is it topical? Does it offer a new angle? How did they      open and close the ...
   THANK YOU!   NOW, IT‘S YOUR TURN!                           26
 Populationaging and fiscalsustainability ◦ News: ―Canada‘s aging population will  strain the health-care system‖        ...
 Mammography                       screening◦ News: ―Mammography harm underappreciated‘  Decline in breast cancer deaths ...
 Activity-based                           hospital funding ◦ News: ―Financer (enfin) les hôpitaux au  rendement‖ (01 mars...
 Generic             vs. Brand drugs ◦ News: ―Generic Drugs vs. Brand Name Drugs‖ (Sept, 2011)   http://www.readersdigest...
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EvidenceNetwork.ca: Workshop on Writing OpEds.

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EvidenceNetwork.ca: Workshop on Writing OpEds.

Presented by Gregory Marchildon, Jennifer Verma, David Secko and Erik Landriault. Canadian Association of Health Services and Policy Research, Annual Conference, May 30, 2012.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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  • EvidenceNetwork.ca is a non-partisan, web-based project funded by the CanadianInstitutes of Health Research and the Manitoba Health Research Council to make the latest evidence on controversial health policy issues available to the media.
  • Refer to Handout of the same namecredit Kathleen O’Grady, Communications Director, EvidenceNetwork.ca
  • Exclusivity is importantByline: Someone based locally or in a position of authorityBalance facts and figures with persuasion and positioning (but not self-serving) DMS: 1. Can the writer claim expertise on the topic? A writer can claim their training or education, current professional position, life experiences, proximity to the topic under discussion, etc., as giving them expertise on a topic. 2. Is the argument refreshing without being perilous to the publication?Consider the tone of the piece. Is it reflective of a reasonable person (not without emotion) instead of seeming to be dangerous to the publications sensibilities? The argument should have a clear point that can be taken away. This point is often counter-intuitive.3. Can the argument be connected to current events or news?Both consumer and trade publications are looking for opinion pieces that draw on a current headline or current topic of interest to its readers.
  • User feesCorresponds to the theme: PATIENT FINANCING OF HEALTHCARE (THE PATIENT PAYS) Corresponding materials:News article: “Explore all funding options for health care, says outgoing CMA head” (Aug 12, 2011) Postmedia News http://www.canada.com/business/Explore+funding+options+health+care+says+outgoing+head/5288501/story.htmlMythbusters research summary: “Myth: User Fees Would Stop Waste and Ensure Better Use of the Healthcare System” (2001) http://www.chsrf.ca/Migrated/PDF/myth4_e.pdfOp-Ed: “Making patients pay won’t make our health system more affordable” (2011-2012) by RaisaDeber and NoralouRoos, published in the The Toronto Star and The Montréal Gazette http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4380
  • User feesCorresponds to the theme: PATIENT FINANCING OF HEALTHCARE (THE PATIENT PAYS) Corresponding materials:News article: “Explore all funding options for health care, says outgoing CMA head” (Aug 12, 2011) Postmedia News http://www.canada.com/business/Explore+funding+options+health+care+says+outgoing+head/5288501/story.htmlMythbusters research summary: “Myth: User Fees Would Stop Waste and Ensure Better Use of the Healthcare System” (2001) http://www.chsrf.ca/Migrated/PDF/myth4_e.pdfOp-Ed: “Making patients pay won’t make our health system more affordable” (2011-2012) by RaisaDeber and NoralouRoos, published in the The Toronto Star and The Montréal Gazette http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4380
  • Focus your column on one and only one topic. You will want to begin discussion on one issue to invite responses so make sure your readers are clear on what they should be arguing about.Choose a topic that you think will interest your readers. Topical issues typically work best, but classic arguments are great when working on a very tight production deadline.Do your research. A good op-ed column presents a well thought out and researched point of view, it is not just a rant by an uninformed writer.Check with publication guidelines to determine length. Chances are the publication will edit for length as they see fit regardless, so be sure you write succinctly and to the point.Use unique ways of expressing yourself. An op-ed column is not just an essay. Do not feel you have to state your thesis, a few supporting ideals and move on. Present your material creatively in a way that will make your readers want to at least consider your stance and keep reading.Grab your reader’s attention. Op-ed columns do not need to follow standard journalistic guidelines. Open with an anecdote, a quote, an example—something that will get your readers interested in what you have to say.Remember that your argument must be present. Opening with a story is great, but be sure that at the heart of that story is your argument and that your stated opinion is clear and follows logical flow.Just like every other article, you will need to edit and rewrite your op-ed column for clarity, structure, and grammar. Your article needs to make sense to readers other than yourself so do not be afraid to rewrite as necessary.How to Write an Op Ed Column | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_4452344_write-op-ed-column.html#ixzz1sj3vMT7l
  • Focus your column on one and only one topic. You will want to begin discussion on one issue to invite responses so make sure your readers are clear on what they should be arguing about.Choose a topic that you think will interest your readers. Topical issues typically work best, but classic arguments are great when working on a very tight production deadline.Do your research. A good op-ed column presents a well thought out and researched point of view, it is not just a rant by an uninformed writer.Check with publication guidelines to determine length. Chances are the publication will edit for length as they see fit regardless, so be sure you write succinctly and to the point.Use unique ways of expressing yourself. An op-ed column is not just an essay. Do not feel you have to state your thesis, a few supporting ideals and move on. Present your material creatively in a way that will make your readers want to at least consider your stance and keep reading.Grab your reader’s attention. Op-ed columns do not need to follow standard journalistic guidelines. Open with an anecdote, a quote, an example—something that will get your readers interested in what you have to say.Remember that your argument must be present. Opening with a story is great, but be sure that at the heart of that story is your argument and that your stated opinion is clear and follows logical flow.Just like every other article, you will need to edit and rewrite your op-ed column for clarity, structure, and grammar. Your article needs to make sense to readers other than yourself so do not be afraid to rewrite as necessary.How to Write an Op Ed Column | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_4452344_write-op-ed-column.html#ixzz1sj3vMT7l
  • EvidenceNetwork.ca: Workshop on Writing OpEds.

    1. 1. Gregory Marchildon, University of ReginaJennifer Verma, CHSRFDavid Secko, Concordia University Annual CAHSPR ConferenceErik Landriault, CIHR-IHSPR May 30, 2012
    2. 2.  Introduce EvidenceNetwork.ca Writing a Snappy OpEd OpEds as a KT vehicle What are OpEd editors looking for? Traditional media vs. Online publishers Beginners‘ Inventory of Popular Outlets YOUR TURN! 1
    3. 3. 2
    4. 4.  Links journalists with health policy experts to provide access to credible, evidence-based information. 3
    5. 5.  To get your research ―out‖ To set the record straight To counter a growing ―belief‖ that is not based on, or even counter to the evidence (myth-busting) To exercise your ―full‖ citizenship 4
    6. 6.  ―Opposite the Editorial Pages‖ (OpEd) Key Perimeters: ◦ Focus on a single or few major points/arguments ◦ Succinct (650-750 words) ◦ Timely (newsworthy) ◦ Compelling, convincing and conversational ◦ Draw from strong evidence (noting, research on its own rarely changes minds) ◦ Jargon- and citation-free (but not evidence-free!) ◦ Provide a solution or steps toward a solution (What needs to be done?) along with the key players (Who needs to do it?) 5
    7. 7. THE LATEST RESEARCH SHOWS THATWE REALLY SHOULD DO SOMETHING WITH ALL THIS RESEARCH 6
    8. 8. Knowledge translation is about: Making users aware of knowledge and facilitating their use of it to improve health and health care systems Closing the gap between what we know and what we do (reducing the know-do gap) Moving knowledge into action 7
    9. 9. Knowledge Translation is something that mostresearchers are already doing, to some extent.Researchers who: publish their research findings tell other researchers about their work present their work at conferences……are engaged in at least one part of the process we call ―knowledge translation‖: disseminating the results of their work to their peers 8
    10. 10.  Consistent evidence of failure to translate research findings into clinical practice: • 30-45% patients do not get treatments of proven effectiveness • 20–25% patients get care that is not needed or potentially harmful (McGlynn et al, 2003; Grol R, 2001; Schuster, McGlynn, Brook, 1998) Cancer outcomes could be improved by 30% with optimum application of what is currently known 10% reduction in cancer mortality with widespread use of available therapies (CSCC 2001; Ford et al, 1990) 9
    11. 11. A broad spectrum of activities including: Diffusion (let it happen) Dissemination (help it happen) ◦ activities that tailor the message and medium to a specific audience Application (make it happen) ◦ moving research into practice/policy in cases where the strength of evidence is sufficient 10
    12. 12. Some filters that editors use when considering opinion:1. Can the writer claim expertise on the topic?2. Is the argument refreshing without being perilous to the publication?3. Can the argument be connected to current events or news?Alterative structural view:1. Starts with a provocative statement;2. Provocative statement is contrasted against what is at stake;3. Supporting information answers everything that might immediately come to a reader‘s mind;4. A recap elaborates on the provocative statement. 11
    13. 13.  Multimediality, inte ractivity and hypertextuality Blended journalism Editorial Staff Authority Speed Audience Content + Distribution + Credibility Secko. JPM 10(2&3): 261 (2009) 12
    14. 14. 13
    15. 15.  Connect with news media that report on health (e.g., Globe and Mail, Hamilton Spectator) and publish analyses, opinion and editorial content (e.g., Troy Media, Huffington Post, The Mark) Put a ―Creative Commons‖ on the content – reprints in small community, rural, niche, ethnic and online media across the country Remember Grey Literature (e.g., NGO newsletters, websites, magazines) Get a ‗double run‘ by translating 14
    16. 16.  Form a team > Pick a theme (4) Review materials (news article, Mythbusters) Develop key points for an OpEd Report back Compare EvidenceNetwork.ca expert OpEds Wrap up and closing thoughts 15
    17. 17. Aging Population and itsPotential ImpactHealthcare Costs andSpending Private, For-Profit Solutions to Funding and DeliveryMore Care is Not AlwaysBetter Patient Financing of Healthcare (The Patient Pays)Health is More thanHealthcare Sustainability Waiting for Care 16
    18. 18. 17
    19. 19.  News: ―Explore all funding options for health care, says outgoing CMA head‖ (Postmedia News, Aug 12, 2011) http://www.canada.com/business/Explore+funding+options+health+care+says+outgoing+head/528 8501/story.html Research Summary: ―Myth: User Fees Would Stop Waste and Ensure Better Use of the Healthcare System‖ (CHSRF, 2001) http://www.chsrf.ca/Migrated/PDF/myth4_e.pdf Op-Ed: ―Making patients pay won‘t make our health system more affordable‖ (2011-2012) by Raisa Deber and Noralou Roos, published in the The Toronto Star and The Montréal Gazette http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4380 18
    20. 20. 19
    21. 21. 20
    22. 22. 21
    23. 23. 22
    24. 24.  What central focus will your OpEd take? ◦ Is it topical? Does it offer a new angle? How might you open and close the OpEd? What are your key lines of argument? Facts? ◦ What other research, evidence or sources would you like to consider? What‘s the greatest struggle you face in preparing/publishing this OpEd? 23
    25. 25.  What central focus will your OpEd take? ◦ Is it topical? Does it offer a new angle? How might you open and close the OpEd? What are your key lines of argument? Facts? ◦ What other research, evidence or sources would you like to consider? What‘s the greatest struggle you face in preparing/publishing this OpEd? 24
    26. 26.  What central focus did they take? ◦ Is it topical? Does it offer a new angle? How did they open and close the OpEd? What are their key lines of argument? Facts? ◦ What other research, evidence or sources did they consider? Other thoughts 25
    27. 27.  THANK YOU! NOW, IT‘S YOUR TURN! 26
    28. 28.  Populationaging and fiscalsustainability ◦ News: ―Canada‘s aging population will strain the health-care system‖ (Feb 6, 2012) http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/editorials/canadas-aging-population- will-strain-the-health-care-system/article2326529/ ◦ Research Summary: ―Myth: The Aging Population is to Blame for Uncontrollable Healthcare Costs‖ (2011) http://www.chsrf.ca/Libraries/Mythbusters/Myth_AgingPopulation_EN_FINAL_1.sflb.ashx ◦ Op-Ed: ―We can sustain our health care system—here‘s how‖(2011-2012) by Neena Chappell, published in the Hill Times, Calgary Herald and the Halifax Chronicle Herald http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4641 27
    29. 29.  Mammography screening◦ News: ―Mammography harm underappreciated‘ Decline in breast cancer deaths from therapy, not screening‖ (Apr 2, 2012) http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/04/02/mammography- overdiagnosis-breast-cancer.html◦ Research Summary: ―Myth: Early detection is good for everyone‖ (2006) and ―Myth: Whole- http://www.chsrf.ca/Migrated/PDF/myth22_e.pdf body screening is an effective way to detect hidden cancers‖ (2009) http://www.chsrf.ca/Migrated/PDF/11491_newsletter_en.pdf◦ Op-Ed: ―Small benefits, substantial harms with mammography screening‖ by Cornelia Baines, published in The National Post and Huffington Post http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4490 28
    30. 30.  Activity-based hospital funding ◦ News: ―Financer (enfin) les hôpitaux au rendement‖ (01 mars 2012) http://www.cyberpresse.ca/debats/editoriaux/201202/29/01-4501135-financer-enfin-les- hopitaux-au-rendement.php and ―Activity-based hospital funding: boon or boondoggle?‖ (May 20, 2008) http://www.cmaj.ca/content/178/11/1407.full.pdf ◦ Research Summary: ―Myth: Activity-Based Funding Leads to For-Profit Hospital Care‖ (2012) http://www.chsrf.ca/Libraries/Mythbusters/Myth-ABF-leads-to-profit-E.sflb.ashx ◦ Op-Ed: ―New hospital funding models not without risks‖ (2012) by Jason Sutherland and M. Trafford Crump, published in the Hill Times and the Calgary Beacon http://beaconnews.ca/calgary/2012/02/why-we-never-seem-to- have-enough-hospital-beds-in-canada/ 29
    31. 31.  Generic vs. Brand drugs ◦ News: ―Generic Drugs vs. Brand Name Drugs‖ (Sept, 2011) http://www.readersdigest.ca/health/sickness-prevention/generic-drugs-vs-brand-name-drugs ◦ Research Summary: ―Myth: Generic Drugs are Lower- quality and Less Safe Than Brandname Drugs‖ (2007) http://www.chsrf.ca/Libraries/Mythbusters/Myth_Generic_drugs_are_lower_quality_EN_FINAL.sflb.a shx ◦ Op-Ed: ―Designer drugs: You‘re really paying for the name‖ (2012) by Alan Cassels, published in the Huffington Post and the Hill Times http://umanitoba.ca/outreach/evidencenetwork/archives/4764 and ―The $2-billion extra price tag of brand-name drugs in Canada‖and ―Our Surprisingly Expensive Pharmaceuticals‖ (2011) by Marc-André Gagnon, published in the Hill Times and The Mark News (respectively) http://www.themarknews.com/articles/4789-our-surprisingly-expensive-pharmaceuticals 30

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