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E D 633 Persuasive Argument Presentation

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E D 633 Persuasive Argument Presentation

  1. 1. THE POSITIVE IMPACT OF INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT
  2. 2. 5 Major Goals <ul><li>Increased student interest in content </li></ul><ul><li>Development of higher-order thinking skills </li></ul><ul><li>Improvement in test scores and grades </li></ul><ul><li>Change in leadership and teacher roles </li></ul><ul><li>Ability to apply learning to real-world situations </li></ul>
  3. 3. Increased interest in content <ul><li>According to Gulek and Demirtas, researchers in a report titled Learning With Technology: The Impact of Laptop Use on Student Achievement, “ Students who use computers when learning to write are not only more engaged and motivated in their writing, but also produce work that is of greater length and higher quality.” </li></ul>
  4. 4. Higher-order thinking skills “ Research and evaluation shows that technology can enable the development of critical thinking skills when students use technology presentation and communication tools to present, publish, and share results of projects” (Cradler et al). Higher-order thinking skills developed with the use of educational technologies 1. Researching skills 2. Comparing and contrasting skills 3. Synthesizing skills 4. Analyzing skills 5. Evaluating skills
  5. 5. Laptop Facts… <ul><li>Laptops lead to more student writing and to writing of higher quality. </li></ul><ul><li>Laptops increase access to information and improve research analysis skills. </li></ul><ul><li>Laptop students readily engage in problem solving and critical thinking. (Gulek & Demirtas) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Improvement in test scores & grades <ul><ul><li>2003-04 Cumulative Grade Point Averages by Grade </li></ul></ul>The information from this study found on slides 6-8 was performed by Gulek & Demirtas and found in the report titled Learning With Technology: The Impact of Laptop Use on Student Achievement. Grade Laptop Non-Laptop 6 3.50 3.13 7 3.28 2.94 8 3.23 3.07
  7. 7. Grades, continued… 2003–04 End-of-Course Grades by Subject, Grade, and Program English Language Arts End-of-course letter grade Laptop Grade 6 Non-Laptop Grade 6 Laptop Grade 7 Non-Laptop Grade 7 Laptop Grade 8 Non-Laptop Grade 8 A 50% 38% 39% 23% 36% 39% B 42% 32% 45% 33% 54% 40% C 7% 21% 11% 28% 10$ 17% D 1% 6% 3% 9% 0% 3% F 0% 3% 2% 7% 0% 1%
  8. 8. Grades, continued… 2003–04 End-of-Course Grades by Subject, Grade, and Program Mathematics End-of-course letter grade Laptop Grade 6 Non-Laptop Grade 6 Laptop Grade 7 Non-Laptop Grade 7 Laptop Grade 8 Non-Laptop Grade 8 A 40% 33% 37% 30% 24% 23% B 41% 31% 38% 32% 36% 29% C 14% 20% 18% 21% 20% 28% D 2% 6% 5% 8% 20% 11% F 3% 10% 2% 9% 0% 9%
  9. 9. Leadership and Teacher roles “ The role of teachers is paramount in guiding the development of students’ higher-order thinking skills during learning activities involving technology tools” (Cradler et al). Leadership Role Teacher Role Align available resource technologies with school improvement goals More cooperative work and less teacher lecturing Need for professional development Increased use of computers Professional learning communities
  10. 10. Ability to apply learning to real-world situations “ Research shows that when students learn to use and apply applications used in the world of work, such as word processors, spreadsheets, computer-aided drawing, Web site development programs, and the Internet, they acquire some of the prerequisite skills for workforce preparedness” (Cradler et al.). “ When content and problem-solving strategies meet accepted education standards, technology increases mastery of vocational and workforce skills and helps prepare students for work” (Cradler et al.).
  11. 11. Why Instructional Technology? <ul><li>Five Main Reasons </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Increased student interest in content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Development of higher-order thinking skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improvement in test scores and grades </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change in leadership and teacher roles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to apply learning to real-world situations </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Bibliography Cradler, J., McNabb M., Freeman M., & Burchett R. (2002). How does technology influence student learning? Learning & Leading with Technology, 29 (8), 46- 56. Gulek, J. C. & Demirtas, H. (2005). Learning with technology: The impact of laptop use on student achievement. The Journal of Technology, Learning, and Assessment, 3 (2). Available from http://www.jtla.org Palozzi, V. J. & Spradlin, T. E. (2006). Educational technologies in Indiana: Is it worth the investment? Center for Evaluation & Education Policy. Education Policy Brief, 4 (4), 1-11. Schacter, John. (1999). The impact of education technology on student achievement: What the most current research has to say. Santa Monica, California: Milken Exchange on Education Technology.

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