Talent Council Survey Results -Impact of Increase ofDual Career CouplesEve S. Sprunt, Chevron2006 President Society of Pet...
Impact ofIncrease ofDual CareerCouples
Why are surveys important? Management is data driven Surveys can reveal quantifiable bias Surveys can show demographic ...
SPE Surveys Key drivers for management are:• Attraction of new employees• Retention of existing employees SPE has conduc...
First Survey Conclusions Dual career couples comprise about half the workforce between 25 and45. Proportion of dual care...
PartnersWomen MenConsider themselves part ofDCC90% 70%Contribute 40 – 60%household income53% 35%Partner in petroleumindust...
Whose career is more important? When both spouses earn about the same amount, 86% ofwomen and 80% of men think both caree...
The question hurts women’s careers8• Women are more likely to be asked• Women with children are about twice as likely tobe...
Motivation to Relocate Top ranked motivator for men and women either dual career or singlecareer was to gain valuable exp...
Key Relocation Issue:A Job For the Spouse 54% of women’s and 39% of men’s comment on relocation were onthe partner’s empl...
Other Barriers to RelocationWhich Of The Following Would Make YouRefuse to Relocate% Women withChildren% Men withChildrenI...
Career AspirationsCareer GoalWhat Level Do You WishTo Attain By The End OfYour Career?What Level Do YouThink You Will Achi...
Children13 57% women and 51% of men answering the survey have children0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%under20 20 to 24 25 to 29 ...
Length of Parental Leave140%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%%TakingThatLengthLeaveDuration of First Maternity LeaveFirst Matern...
Parents Want Flexible Work Arrangements When asked what their employer did well to support work-lifebalance, dual career ...
Pressure Not to Use Flexible Work-LifeBalance Friendly Policies 13% of women and men encountered resistance from their ma...
Parents Want Childcare Freeform comments:– 25% of the women and 21% of the men addressed childcare in theircomments– On-s...
Conclusions of Second Survey(Full report in SPE paper #160928) Managers in “traditional” single career marriages often do...
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Second dual career couple survey 2012

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Results of a survey conducted by the Society of Petroleum Engineers in May 2011 on factors impacting dual career couples. 5570 people participated in the survey.

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Second dual career couple survey 2012

  1. 1. Talent Council Survey Results -Impact of Increase ofDual Career CouplesEve S. Sprunt, Chevron2006 President Society of PetroleumEngineers
  2. 2. Impact ofIncrease ofDual CareerCouples
  3. 3. Why are surveys important? Management is data driven Surveys can reveal quantifiable bias Surveys can show demographic trends Ask difficult questions3
  4. 4. SPE Surveys Key drivers for management are:• Attraction of new employees• Retention of existing employees SPE has conducted two surveys on DualCareer Couple Issues• May 2011 of entire SPE membershipwith 5570 responses• December 2011 of SPE members underage 45 with 1392 responses Early 2013 launch retention issues survey4
  5. 5. First Survey Conclusions Dual career couples comprise about half the workforce between 25 and45. Proportion of dual career couples will increase as the big crew changeprogresses. The female percentage of the petroleum engineering workforce isincreasing and will continue to increase. Female technical professionals are delaying, but not forgoingmotherhood. Women may work for a decade or longer before becomingmothers. Relocation is easier if both partners in the couple work for the samecompany, but some couples intentionally work with differentemployers, because of unwanted comparisons with their partner. Report on first survey is available through SPE’s One Petro as SPE-151971-MS and was published in October 2011 issue of SPE’s Journalof Petroleum Technology (JPT).5
  6. 6. PartnersWomen MenConsider themselves part ofDCC90% 70%Contribute 40 – 60%household income53% 35%Partner in petroleumindustry65% 43%Partner with same employer 28% 21%6Female petroleum engineers are more likely than male petroleumengineers to be part of a dual career couple, contribute about half ofthe family income and have a partner in the petroleum industry and apartner with the same employer.
  7. 7. Whose career is more important? When both spouses earn about the same amount, 86% ofwomen and 80% of men think both careers are equallyimportant. Older managers with a stay-at-home spouse do notunderstand the concept of two careers being equallyimportant. Many employers want couple to pick whose career takesprecedence.• “Always, one career has to lead and the other follow.”• “It is a must for one of them to accept being the secondone or relegated employee.” We have a generation gap!7
  8. 8. The question hurts women’s careers8• Women are more likely to be asked• Women with children are about twice as likely tobe asked as the equivalent men• When couple work for the same employer muchmore likely to be askedBut even when they make about the same amountof money as their spouse• 4 times as many men as women think their careeris more important at the present time (16% vs4%)• Almost 7 times as man men as women think theircareer is more important in the long run (34% vs5%)
  9. 9. Motivation to Relocate Top ranked motivator for men and women either dual career or singlecareer was to gain valuable experience Top motivators for dual career men, single men, and single womenwere the same. For dual career women, “if the move was to a location where mypartner can find work” was the 2nd ranked motivator. It was ranked6th by men. Only a very small percentage of women and men said that they wouldnot be willing to relocate under any circumstances.9
  10. 10. Key Relocation Issue:A Job For the Spouse 54% of women’s and 39% of men’s comment on relocation were onthe partner’s employment. Men more often than women comment on financial replacement of thepartner’s income. Both genders frequently wrote:– “Hire my spouse”– “Help find a job for my partner” But, only 13% of women and 17% of men said their company dida good job of providing employment assistance for anaccompanying partner.10
  11. 11. Other Barriers to RelocationWhich Of The Following Would Make YouRefuse to Relocate% Women withChildren% Men withChildrenIf there was not a school for my children 86 77If I could not obtain affordable, reliablechildcare62 38If I could not obtain adequate medical carefor one of my family members63 64If I had to move to a developing orpolitically unstable country55 551169% of the women and 76% of the men think that relocation is important toachieve what they want in their career.When it comes to life or death issues, there was no gender difference.
  12. 12. Career AspirationsCareer GoalWhat Level Do You WishTo Attain By The End OfYour Career?What Level Do YouThink You Will AchieveBy The End Of YourCareer?% Women % Men % Women % MenTop management 30 43 21 35Middle management 25 19 29 28Lower level management 6 3 12 5Individual contributor/subjectmatter expert23 15 24 15Self employed 8 6 6 5Founder of your own company 7 14 4 12Other 2 1 4 112Women have lower expectations than men.
  13. 13. Children13 57% women and 51% of men answering the survey have children0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%under20 20 to 24 25 to 29 30 to 34 35 to 39 over 40PercentofGenderAge RangeParents Age When First Child BornWomenMen
  14. 14. Length of Parental Leave140%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%%TakingThatLengthLeaveDuration of First Maternity LeaveFirst Maternity LeaveUS CitizensNorway CitizensRest of the World0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%45%50%%TakingthatLengthLeaveDuration of First Paternity LeaveFirst Paternity LeaveUS CitizensNorway CitizensRest of the World
  15. 15. Parents Want Flexible Work Arrangements When asked what their employer did well to support work-lifebalance, dual career couples, and working parents, more people(56%) cited flexible working hours and telecommuting than anythingelse.15Things parents mentioned infreeform comments that theiremployer could do to make iteasier for them to manage% Mother’sComments% Father’sCommentsFlexible hours 34 28Telecommuting 19 21Part-time work 9 29/80 schedules 3 2
  16. 16. Pressure Not to Use Flexible Work-LifeBalance Friendly Policies 13% of women and men encountered resistance from their manager within the last yearwhen trying to use their company’s work-life balance friendly policies. 20% of women and 15% of men encountered negative feedback from colleagues. Women wrote:– “Allow me to use the programs that they already offer”– “Less negativity for working those flexible hours from team members”– “More senior support for existing policies” Men wrote:– “Promote a culture of achievements and success rather than time spent on task.”– “Provide flexible hours and telecommuting options as opposed to being chained to a desk whenit doesn’t add much value to the company.”– “Take a more liberal interpretation of flexible work schedule policies companywide. Currently itis VERY manager specific.”– “Honor the policies”– “I may not have ever received pushback directly, but there is a lot of indirect pushback due tothe level of work that is required to be completed so you feel that you must sacrifice your familytime a lot of the time to get your work completed.”– “The company has very good policies for dual career couples, but the implementation is manytimes not in the spirit of the policies with supervisors concerned about their own deliverables.”16
  17. 17. Parents Want Childcare Freeform comments:– 25% of the women and 21% of the men addressed childcare in theircomments– On-site childcare (21% women, 10% men)– General childcare assistance (4% women, 11% men) On-site daycare should be viewed as a family benefit, not a women’sbenefit.17
  18. 18. Conclusions of Second Survey(Full report in SPE paper #160928) Managers in “traditional” single career marriages often do notunderstand the issues faced by dual career couples Employers should adjust policies to reflect increase in dualcareer couples– Coordination of dual careers when both work for sameemployer– Offer flexible time/telecommuting– Consider on-site daycare Asking “Whose career takes precedence?” is damaging --especially to women’s careers, because women very rarely puttheir career first. Women place a higher priority on protecting their partner’scareer than most men do.18

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