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Ev ent-anglement with photos india

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#Ev-Ent-Anglement 2 
To (Re)Perform a Theory of Feminist 
Digital Praxis: 
Cutting Through the Noise of the Digital Self 
...

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A Performative Précis 
Performing the same Précis 
to another 
audience 
in Utrecht, 
Summer, 2014.

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To Cut 
A “causal procedure and act of decision” 
Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska 
Life After New Media (MIT Press: 2012)

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Ev ent-anglement with photos india

  1. 1. #Ev-Ent-Anglement 2 To (Re)Perform a Theory of Feminist Digital Praxis: Cutting Through the Noise of the Digital Self Visible Evidence Dehhi, India International Center December, 2014
  2. 2. A Performative Précis Performing the same Précis to another audience in Utrecht, Summer, 2014.
  3. 3. To Cut A “causal procedure and act of decision” Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska Life After New Media (MIT Press: 2012)
  4. 4. To Paste A “causal procedure and act of decision” Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska Life After New Media (MIT Press: 2012)
  5. 5. To Cut “Cuts are part of the phenomena they help produce.” Karen Barad Meeting the Universe Halfway (date)
  6. 6. Loop!
  7. 7. Loop … Cut! … Repeat “Can the loop be a new narrative form appropriated for the computer age?” “It is relevant to recall that the loop gave birth not only to cinema but also to computer programing.” Lev Manovich, The Language of New Media (MIT: 2001)
  8. 8. Assemblage
  9. 9. Alex Juhasz, “Digital AIDS Documentary: Webs, Rooms, Viruses & Quilts,” Blackwell Anthology of Documentary, Juhasz and Alisa Lebow, eds.
  10. 10. little parts of me
  11. 11. just for the man
  12. 12. fragments of myself
  13. 13. A Cut+Paste from a student at the Utrecht #Ev-ent-anglement
  14. 14. Your Script: Ev-Ent-anglement 2 Go to http://ev-ent-anglement.com and watch the ev-ent-anglement unfold. As I talk, or sometime within a week after, please #cut/paste+bleed into the #ev-ent-anglement from the archive of yourself. • Please try to #cut/paste+bleed at minimum twice • Please try to paste+bleed to something already cut before you Everything you paste needs this hashtag to be seen: #eventanglement • On Twitter: #eventanglement • On Instagram: #eventanglement Find or make images, links, words, video or gifs that express your responses, connections, ideas, and questions. You can write at any length in the comment box provided. You might be distracted. But the “talk” and site isn’t going anywhere … http://ev-ent-anglement.com
  15. 15. 2. Once again with feeling: from a student at the Utrecht Ev-ent-anglement
  16. 16. From Eve-ent-anglement 1, Utrecht
  17. 17. From Alanna Thain@Utrecht
  18. 18. From Ingrid Ryberg@Utrecht
  19. 19. From “All Shades of Grey,” Minou Norouzi@Urecht
  20. 20. From Ingrid Ryberg
  21. 21. From Utrecht
  22. 22. 3. The Em-Body as #Ev-Ent-Anglement The photographic act, both as “technique” and “ethical imperative,” serves as “an active practice of cutting through the flow of mediation.” “Time is indivisible, continuous and unknowable, at least to the intellect. In order to ‘know’ it, we must … cut.” Kember and Zylinska, Life after New Media
  23. 23. Sense-Making from Utrecht with Love
  24. 24. The audience in Utrecht, August 2014
  25. 25. Her again (she’s found and pasted a photo of herself reading French Feminisms)
  26. 26. #Cut/Paste+Bleed Please refer to your script. I humbly request that you join the #ev-ent-anglement at least twice during or refer this “talk.” I hope we might “do media studies” in a form that is not only analysis but is “simultaneously critical and creative.” (K & Z, xvii)
  27. 27. From Yumke@Utrecht August 27, 2014 at 8:12 am When I was thinking about what to “paste” here, I wanted to contribute something in a way we all can. And I thought of a article written about the artist Carol Rossetti: http://m.mic.com/articles/92651/18- empowering-illustrations-to-remind-everyone-who-s-really- in-charge-of-women-s-bodies She makes empowering drawings for all kind of women, I really enjoyed them and felt empowered by some of them! Reply
  28. 28. From KJ@Internet August 29, 2014 at 3:52 pm This reminds me of Bill Shannon’s creative dance movement at the nexus of art & disability; my 6 year-old son also has the same pediatric hip disease (Legg-Calve-Perthes) and we have been relearning what it means to move freely in the world, always subject to limitations of the body. Reply
  29. 29. KJ continues I have recently made a rather large cut to myself or rather a surgeon made it for me out of great necessity (It was a kind of a “do or die” situation) This edit to my physical body invites interpretations, many times by strangers People whom I don’t know and who don’t know me. I don’t mean to be mysterious but it’s complicated. Online I am a composite of many identities gendered this way or that and strangely I find myself entangled in fragments of former selves which are constantly colliding shattering the illusion of the seamless narratives about gender identity about cancer often required for the comfort of others. #eventanglement
  30. 30. The Last Cut is not the Deepest From Sarah Kember@Internet
  31. 31. “Then Along Came STS/And…” by Nina Wakeford, pasted by Sarah Kember
  32. 32. From Joanna Zylinska@Internet
  33. 33. Editing “straddles the line between art and craft” Valerie Orpen, Film Editing: The Art of the Expressive
  34. 34. The first advertising silent film Lumiere Brothers (1896): Washing Up
  35. 35. Every stop is linked to another go
  36. 36. “Film Editing: The Art of the Expressive” Where the cut allows for “pruning, curtailing, rejecting, removing” the join permits “adding and accreting.” (Valerie Orpen, Film Editing)
  37. 37. hypermediacy “the collage of effect of media forms and styles” (Kember & Zylinska, 8)
  38. 38. Spatial Montage: “Feminism”@YouTube
  39. 39. A tweet with a fragmented screen@Utrecht
  40. 40. Two more tweets@Utrecht
  41. 41. Spatial Montage “Editing at its most Eisensteinian enlivens dead things through the clash of the cut.” Alex Juhasz
  42. 42. A Tweet with a video about AIDS nostalgia and death@Utrecht
  43. 43. The Cut-Up Method of Brion Gysin “Cut ups are for everyone. Anybody can make cut ups. It is experimental in the sense of being something to do.” William S. Burroughs
  44. 44. “All writing is in fact cut-ups” Burroughs
  45. 45. Man with a Movie Camera Women with her Editing Scissors
  46. 46. The Fall of the Romanov Dynasty (Esfir Shub, 1927)
  47. 47. Cutting
  48. 48. Ab-jecting “Repelling, rejecting; repelling itself, rejecting itself. Ab-jecting.” Julia Kristeva, 1980
  49. 49. +Metaphoric Glue “forces, intensities, and energies not substances,” effecting the “complex, random processes not predictable states.” Diana Coole and Samantha Frost: “Introduction” New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency and Politics
  50. 50. Cyborg Bleed-Through “What kind of politics could embrace partial, contradictory, permanently unclosed constructions of personal and collective selves and still be faithful, effective—and, ironically, socialist-feminist?” Donna Haraway, “A Cyborg Manifesto”
  51. 51. “An argument for pleasure in the confusion of boundaries and for responsibility in their construction,” Donna Haraway
  52. 52. We cut/paste+bleed binaries Art/Craft Long take/Montage On/Off screen Invisible/Visible Dull matter/Vibrant life Loop/Line Hierarchy/Flat Politics/Feelings Past/Present Present/Future Cut up/Happening Time/Space Virality/Duration Critique/Create
  53. 53. Intra-action “There is no ‘between’ as such, human and non-human organisms and machines emerge only through their mutual co-constitution.” Karen Barad
  54. 54. photos
  55. 55. tweets
  56. 56. Blog posts
  57. 57. videos
  58. 58. essays
  59. 59. purchases
  60. 60. Thumbs up
  61. 61. “Composting the Net” Shu Lea Cheang, 2012
  62. 62. The dump of the Internet
  63. 63. From KJ, looped or lopped August 27, 2014 at 8:19 pm • I have recently made a rather large cut to myself or rather a surgeon made it for me out of great necessity • (It was a kind of a “do or die” situation) • This edit to my physical body invites interpretations, many times by strangers People whom I don’t know and who don’t know me. • I don’t mean to be mysterious but it’s complicated. • Online I am a composite of many identities gendered this way or that and strangely I find myself entangled in fragments of former selves which are constantly colliding shattering the illusion of the seamless narratives about gender identity about cancer often required for the comfort of others. #eventanglement
  64. 64. From noortje@Utrecht (I think) August 27, 2014 at 8:44 am Digital distracted fragmentation/ watermelon nostalgia/ cutting pasting bleeding/ Abjects/ drowning in liquidity/ littering the archive of the world/ screaming to be reused/ stitching, curating ourselves/ Again/ It’s never to late to be what you have been/
  65. 65. From Pato Hebert@Internet August 27, 2014 at 6:47 am • Thanks for #Cutting/Pasting+Bleeding open a space with and for so many of us Alex. I’m wondering how our incisionsutures relate to to revisiting as a way to reassemble anew. I’m thinking about what it meant to post on FB from the International AIDS Conference last month, trying to hold the spin of real bodies in mobilizing motion in relationship to the stasis of health bureaucracies, the connective tissue of fellowship and the en-couragment of folks far in body but close in struggle and heart. Cleaving, clotting, accompanying… • https://www.facebook.com/pato.hebert/media_set?set=a. 1439918602960409.1073741854.100008268480364&type= 1
  66. 66. From Instagram
  67. 67. From domi olivieri@Utrecht August 27, 2014 at 7:59 am Right now I hear and see you talking of cutting, editing, pasting, and while getting distracted, this comes to mind: in “Cinema Interval” Trinh Minh-ha writes, “I would say that creating rhythm is a way of working with intervals – silences, pauses, pacing – and working with intervals means working with relationships in the wider sense of the term” (Trinh 1999a, 38).
  68. 68. From TL Cowan@Internet • August 28, 2014 at 1:38 pm After my first week of teaching • /Cut To/ “Race, Gender, Cultural Politics: Reading bell hooks” — a First Year Seminar teaching Teaching to Transgress, Writing Beyond Race and other hooks’ articles as well as some contemporary culture maker/theorists, Marci Blackman’s novel, Tradition, and Janet Mock’s memoir, Redefining Realness, and Shola Lynch’s film “Free Angela Davis and All Political Prisoners” – three of hooks’ interlocutors at a recent public discussion at Eugene Lang College (The New School) where I teach (see the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJk0hNROvzs). #context • /Cut To/ “Transgender Cultural Studies” an upper-year seminar that also fulfills the requirement for “Intro to Feminist Theory” in our always precarious Gender Studies Minor. There are students who have already done so much thinking about this topic and others who are just beginning & I worry about the knowledge gap – how does a teacher make sure that everyone is learning? • /Cut To/ I am a white cisgender lady (I like ‘lady’ better than ‘woman’ these days) teaching these courses that so far exceed my experiential knowledges, but I’m teaching them because I believe in curriculum transformation and that it is possible to teach and learn across difference. But I am nervous that I am going to fuck it up.
  69. 69. From Petra Kuppers@Internet
  70. 70. “Sound/text ridingthe meridian hyper/text riding the meridian text/text ridingthemeridan sound/text” http://www.heelstone.com/meridian/theory2.html

Editor's Notes

  • A Performative Précis
    Cut! That’s a wrap! Hey, that’s a strange way to start something, isn’t it?
  • For, a cut marks a hard stop; an end to something that was rolling along just fine without it; a precarious if probably also false point of finitude judiciously pulled from the flow by some sort of performer, presenter, author or director. To cut is celebrated doubly by Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska as both a “causal procedure” and an “act of decision.”
    Cut! I need to add something here: for, for every cut there is a paste. So let me try again: Paste!
  • Every cut is a beginning. One moment ends, another launches, hanging there just on the other side of the brink, gently commencing its steady unroll.
  • “Cuts are part of the phenomena they help produce,” suggests Karen Barad.
    Cut! That’s a wrap! Hey, that’s a strange way to start something, isn’t it? Alrighty then: Loop!
  • [PLAY VIDEO] If you use a cut and stitch to the same beginning, well, there’s your loop.
  • “Can the loop be a new narrative form appropriated for the computer age?” asks Lev Manovich, who answers: “It is relevant to recall that the loop gave birth not only to cinema but also to computer programing.” Cut!
    So, I’ll just let this repeat
  • {PLAY} while linking something else to it, and see: an assemblage we’ve got! Let a little bit of this touch a little bit of that, linking fragments that might never have been meant to be in proximity-- until I chose and moved them that is--and attached them, inelegantly together with a simple set of digital tools, all the while exposing the ugly seams so you’d see my hand, my love bleeding out to you with every careful cut and stitch. Together, sharing the page or better yet the stage. Or the quilt.
  • I wrote this at an earlier time, about quilting, cutting and Digital AIDS Documentary. And it’s about to be in a book, one that will be duly celebrated here in India I hear tell…
     
    On these pages, I can stitch together multiple, competing and connecting interpretations, representations, and technologies of the AIDS quilt: a paper-bound linear tactic that allows discrete moments and their memories to infect each other. If “AIDS is a crisis of connections,” digital media serves to link, defying forces of nature that might otherwise keep ideas, bodies, memories, or images untouched, disconnected or maybe uninfected.
    But why say anything here and now when I said it already before, there, and then and you can buy it, or rip it, and read it later? That raises two of the questions I’ll be persuing here and now (if you’re in the room) and always later if you read this Power Point online: what to do well with so many records of what we’ve already done, and why we persist at being live, in-person, together in space and time when we’ve done so much of ourself already on the Internet  …
     
    Cut!
     
    Hey, that really hurts! Could you help me feel a bit better? Better yet, could you help me to learn to self-suture? Both cut and link all those fragments of me back to myself, fragments that litter the stage, which is here and now but also always the Internet; me, ever so easy to find, and increasingly harder to lose.
  • Little parts of me and sometimes you
  • that I made just for the man!
  • I swear it didn’t hurt when I shot them or when I was shot. But it still feels painful, having fragments of myself there to be used in the service of God only knows what
  • In response, I want to try to cut myself back together with others, and you, in a feminist ethic that links deeper, farther, and truer, to previous knowledge and current context, to communities, ideas and analyses that matter. That links me to you in a feminist entanglement that links you to me, if you’re ready and willing to seep in that is. Your script is forthcoming. …
  • It’s here
    Cut! That’s a wrap! But I’m not sure that was clear. So let me start again … Loop!
  • 2. Once again with feeling
    And loop it is. That’s exactly how I started my talk this August at the Noise European Summer School in Women’s Studies from Multicultural and Interdisciplinary Perspectives, Utrecht University. And then I gave them a script, and for the next hour (and for another week on the Internet)
  • they pasted and cut ideas,
  • links, images, videos, tweets, and comments onto my site,
  • and I responded, reviewed, and concluded as well.

  • All told, there was something like 50-100 unique additions to the site made in its first iteration. I received poems, new photos and old, tweets with videos, writing with links.
    I’ll be showing some of these to you here, but they’re all there on the #ev-ent-anglement, waiting for your thoughts and links.
    This is the second ev-ent-anglement, a loop, to which I invite you to paste.
  • I invite you to peruse what was before, and is also now and here, or later; as you wish, as you engage.

  • I also share with you a much-addended script: it might help you to act.
  • 3. The #Em-Body as #Ev-Ent-Anglement
    In their book, Life After New Media: Mediation as a Vital Process, Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska present a complicated command: to cut well.
    They suggest that the photographic act, both as “technique” and “ethical imperative” serves as “an active practice of cutting through the flow of mediation.” By making a temporal intervention with a camera—which can be an ethical choice that marks a difference between this and that, me and you, human and thing, now and then—
  • we begin to know ourselves and our world:
  • They write: “Time is indivisible, continuous and unknowable, at least to the intellect. In order to ‘know’ it, we must … cut.”
  • I want us here, today, in Delhi and live across the Internet (and always also before or later and not exactly dead but not in this live time either), to build on and from their requirement and query, as well as in connection to what people in Utrecht and elsewhere thought earlier, so as to answer: “what does it mean to cut well”?
  • I suggest that a distinctly feminist media ethic would allow us to cut through and also link onto such a technological cut—and thus to assemble—our chosen, gathered, shared, specific, local, and political fragments, actions, objects, and outcomes that we make and feel together:
  • that we embody and archive here, in a room, and on the Internet.
  • I ask you to #cut/paste+bleed onto this event and into the Internet—as did KJ and many others did before you – Read his thoughts, and paste your own feelings, knowledge, commitments, and questions as feminist scholars of your own definition, with your own interests, commitments, histories and theories of feminism
  • READ
  • When you cut and paste you will be archiving some of what we are and know here in Delhi, but also as we connect to other theres and many thens too, re-assembling records of this moment intentionally and through technology with carefully pruned, already-made digital fragments of past ourselves, communities, and commitments
  • Together we are intentionally building and saving a feminist record of our shared now, and our linked then, as well as whatever future plans and schemes—
  • rooted in knowledge and analysis of our past—that we can add to the mix.
  • In Life After New Media, Kember and Zylinska ask: “Can we think of a way of ‘doing media studies’ that is not just a form of ‘media analysis’ and that is simultaneously critical and creative?” And, I propose that to try to do so, we will cut and paste well and together; we will collectively make a further feminist #ev-ent-anglement of this talk. I get to our proposed method (#cut/paste+bleed) by way of montage theory and practice, because in ways that will be important to us “editing straddles the line between art and a craft.”
  • PLAY. When the film director yells “Cut!” the action (or performance) and the camera’s mechanisms stop. One shot is formed from all this activity and its termination. When next, the director yells “Action!” the camera begins to roll again, pulling the same piece of celluloid through its mechanisms, allowing light to expose the frames of celluloid that will record whatever performance also commences newly in front of its lens. The first stop is linked to another go. Where the cut allows for “pruning, curtailing, rejecting, removing” the join permits “adding and accreting.” Of course, for some, the art of cinema is in the shot, true for both those enamored of cinema verite, the long-take or the indexical. But for just as many others, the magic and power of cinema is in the edit, which is to say the cut and the paste.
    For those who celebrate the cut, cinema’s expressivity is linked to a two-part act that concludes with the paste.

  • PLAY: The first stop is linked to another go. Where the cut allows for “pruning, curtailing, rejecting, removing” the join permits “adding and accreting.” Of course, for some, the art of cinema is in the shot, true for both those enamored of cinema verite, the long-take or the indexical. But for just as many others, the magic and power of cinema is in the edit, which is to say the cut and the paste.
  • For those who celebrate the cut, cinema’s expressivity is linked to a two-part act that concludes with the paste.
  • Many theorists outside of editing find power in similar projects of spatio-temporal realignment. Kember and Zylinska name this “hypermediacy … the collage of effect of media forms and styles.”
  • This is what most webpages look like, and a great deal of contemporary editing, as well.
  • Flat planes where many forms of media are either loosely, or sharply, but always visibly assembled together outside a logic of space/time coherence
  • , or that of cause and effect.
  • We sometimes call this “MTV editing,” or “spatial montage.” I put it like this about my own queer video aesthetic: “Editing at its most Eisensteinian enlivens dead things through the clash of the cut.”
  • Of course, cutting, pasting, and showing the stitch is just plain easy to do, while also being expressively effective.
  • William S. Borroughs wrote: “Cut ups are for everyone. Anybody can make cut ups. It is experimental in the sense of being something to do.”
  • PLAY: Importantly for our project here, cutting or editing is both historically women’s work, craft, and arguably feminist work; “like doing the washing up,” as much as it is like creating art
  • PLAY: Dziga Vertov’s Man With a Movie Camera also draws out cutting and editing in gendered terms. The man, the cameraman, Vertov’s real-life brother, Mikhail Kaufman, projects exuberantly into the world, empowered by his phallic camera that allows him to see and own the world newly. But soon after (or actually in the middle of) his adventure, we meet someone else: the editing-woman (after already having been introduced to several other kinds of seamstresses and the loops that support their craft). In the film’s central scene, we meet Vertov’s real world wife, Yelizaveta Svilova, who sits quietly in a dark room attending to what remains after the man’s cocky adventures (climbing towering smokestacks, wedging himself below hurtling trains), and almost effortlessly it seems, does with it whatever she will or wants. His shots’ indexical traces tremble beneath the simple, graceful snips of her scissors and the sticky pastes of her editing console.
  • PLAY: Man with the Movie Camera could as easily be called Woman with her Editing Scissors. In her hand, the indexical hold of the shot is obliterated by the expressive clutch of the cut. “Authenticity of original footage is not truthful … The meaning of the shot is produced in context,” kvell Reisz and Millar. They refer here to Esfir Shub, inventor of the compilation film; Esfir Shub, Soviet constructivist genius sister to the other editing masters, who allowed us to understand that it is the quiet, docile, hidden editor (and the archival researcher who finds the ready-made material she uses) who can so powerfully take control of meaning in the cinema.
  • Of course the contemporary act of self-cutting, like editing, can be understood in similarly gendered terms [PP41]: a violent act of power-seeking performed in yet another of those private places allocated to women in patriarchy. Interestingly, this kind of cutting does not bring with it an associated paste. What this cut brings with it, what it wants, its dyadic, is a bleed.
  • While all human bodies (and those of other animals) bleed, a particular kind of bleeding will help focus the bleed’s role in our feminist project of #ev-ent-anglement 2—one where our directives are to #cut/paste+bleed —because the menses are one of many in-between bodily acts that are uniquely and distinctly female. Julia Kristeva asks us to consider bodily acts, like menstruation, at the border between clean and dirty, live and dead, inside and out: “Repelling, rejecting; repelling itself, rejecting itself.  Ab-jecting.”
  • The seeping and connecting quality of all blood allows it to be a metaphoric glue that marks the many pulls of our present entanglement—from in to out and on to off, from me to you to us, from digital matter to living body. Sarah Ahmed calls this “affect: what sticks, or what sustains or preserves the connection between ideas, values, and objects.” Of course all people—men, those in-between or indeterminate, and females who don’t menstruate—can bleed with us too!
  • Cyborgs all, we make quick use of technology, body, affect and and place to flow through the distinctive binaries of our time and this project:
  • Let’s cut/paste and bleed through binaries! The bleed is how we perform what Barad calls “intra-action” where “there is no ‘between’ as such, human and non-human organisms and machines emerge only through their mutual co-constitution.”
  • Today, and always later online, for every cut, we have a paste that we glue with figurative blood to together make our #ev-ent-anglement 2 from what is in this room at this time, what was in another place and time, and also what sits on the Internet spaces where we also reside and connect. There is no in-between.
  • And, where do we get these things that we might cut/paste + bleed, you might ask? The Internet’s full of ‘em! Full of us. Brimming with fragments we’ve cut of ourselves ripe for new intra-actions:
  • photos
  • tweets
  • blog posts
  • videos
  • essays
  • purchases
  • thumbs up
  • If the Internet is an unorchestrated archive of fragments of all our selves, we might want to take on the empowering feminist role of editor and curate ourselves, together, into a collection that matters.
  • Our object is ourself and ourselves. Our Bodies/Our Selves Redux. Lopped. Looped. Lined. Linked. Re-Aligned. Show the Seams. Justice to our fragments!
  • Which is to say that we can engage in a process of cutting, pasting, and bleeding ourselves together—READ
  • as we are and have been, as we have made ourselves online and off, in community, history, and action with others—READ
  • as our way to cut well, because we are feminist scholars and activists, and this is our shared project

  • Our #ev-ent-anglement with each other and technology allows us to cut/paste+bleed digital fragments of ourselves, and what matters most to us, including the words and images of others,
  • And our histories and art and feelings … and books,
  • into purposeful, co-produced montage-collages: READ
  • that can not be contained, isolated or easily commodified. I invite you to join or at least bleed to us. Thank you.

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