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Cuny talk

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Cuny talk

  1. 1. affect bleeds in feminist social networks Alexandra Juhasz Brooklyn College
  2. 2. #ev-ent-anglement • Ev-ent-anglement.com • Cells.ev-ent-anglement.com • #eventangle • #Cut/paste+bleed • @Utrecht, @Dehli, @Dublin, @Montreal, @PAM, @NYU, @CUNY
  3. 3. #ev-ent-anglement @Utrecht
  4. 4. Ev-ent-anglement.com
  5. 5. #ev-ent-anglement @Delhi
  6. 6. #ev-ent-anglement @Dublin
  7. 7. #eventangle
  8. 8. #eventangle
  9. 9. #eventangle
  10. 10. #eventangle
  11. 11. @patohebert
  12. 12. From Dublin
  13. 13. From Dublin
  14. 14. cells.ev-ent-anglement.com
  15. 15. 26 cut-ups to show and feel the bleed
  16. 16. Learning/practicing (1): the difference between spontaneous emotions and educated feelings. (@intheintervals) Yes, there is something that exceeds the mimetic copy of some part of yourself or others—so effortlessly passed along as a digital fragment. We have affect in the network: our bodies, and poetry, and pictures, dance, words and humor as reminder, and as mediums, to get us ever closer to that uncapturable evanescent event.
  17. 17. Of course the contemporary act of self-cutting, like editing, can be understood in gendered terms: a violent act of power-seeking performed in yet another of those private places allocated to women in patriarchy. Self-cutting does not bring with it an associated paste. What this cut brings with it, what it wants, its dyadic, is a bleed Technologies, like people, slide over some things, stick others together, allow for friction, cuts, pain and pleasure. Parts of us stay put, others travel on.
  18. 18. I feel annoyed to be watching the clock to get my kid from daycare. I was so happy when you said you loved “The Argonauts,” and then squirmily delighted when you said smart generous things to me after I presented. Very sweaty most of today. I’m curious about everyone’s love lives, as always. (Jenny Burman)
  19. 19. So we wait for our bodies to appear, we wait in the gaps, or cuts, or silhouettes of time; we wait, we exist, and create. (@Komiksgrrrl) Feminist collectivity as the shadow archive of contemporary academic culture. (@Aging SuperModel)
  20. 20. I use the concept of “Egyptian feeling” as a named, circulated and sticky emotion, where the cultural, political and biological aspects of emotions merge together. (Anu Laukkanen)
  21. 21. Perhaps people stay in places because they live or lived some place? And yet we move on: for each small paste holds another cut it seems … Cuts are part of the phenomena they help produce,” writes Karen Barad.
  22. 22. Alex argued to cut is to create a silhouette, which can serve as a visual signifier of what was once there but is not a lack. (@Komiksgrrrl) Ordinary affects are public feelings that begin and end in broad circulation, but they are also the stuff that seemingly intimate lives are made of. They give circuits and flows the forms of a life. (Kathleen Stewart)
  23. 23. Cut ups are for everyone. Anybody can make cut ups. It is experimental in the sense of being something to do. … The use of scissors renders the process explicit and subject to extension and variation. (William Burroughs)
  24. 24. #eventanglement values feminist complexity, community, and collaboration outside the logic of capital, when possible.
  25. 25. I want to try to cut myself and my events back together with a feminist ethic that links deeper, farther, and truer to previous knowledge and current context, to communities and audiences, and to the ideas and analyses that matter to us. That links me to you in a feminist entanglement that links you to me, if you’re ready and willing to seep in that is.
  26. 26. I begin with the messiness of the experiential, the unfolding of bodies into worlds, and what I have called “the drama of contingency,” how we are touched by what comes near. (Sara Ahmed)
  27. 27. What is the glue that inspires or captivates an audience to assemble linger, and act?
  28. 28. Those queer pleasures & feminist politics that drew us into academia might yet survive. (@raultishness)
  29. 29. Yes here, like all travelers who must return home eventually, we have only representation to mark and remake our connections, our history–photos, songs, words, and the affect embedded perhaps therein–and it works! Something is seen, felt and known in this flat vast place. Something felt remains. Because, it seems, we have more than representation. Our bodies remember the encounter, and our weird poetry captures something of what we were and what you and I want me to be.
  30. 30. I suppose I'm trying to think through that notion of cutting as something that creates new forms of meaning with absence. (@Komiksgrrrl)
  31. 31. I remember the wildness of 15 from the inside. I could do anything fucking anything. (Jenny Burman)
  32. 32. fragilization // politics of care // movements // temporalities. (@intheintervals) The most interesting aspect of the image, in other words, is the way that it is not simply itself but is itself plus a nugget or shadow or trace of intensity. An image is itself and more. (Jodi Dean)
  33. 33. We are moved by things. And in being moved, we make things. (Sara Ahmed) The ev-ent-anglement considers how and what we can save, pass, know, and be moved by, together, on the Internet and in the world: how affect moves in feminist networks.
  34. 34. An affective approach to images requires a close understanding of the different layers through which a body operates as an image among other images. (L Parisi & T Terranova)
  35. 35. Ev-ent-anglement • Is affect in Montreal different from #affect in #Montreal?
  36. 36. 26 cut-ups redux

Editor's Notes

  • 1. This talk is one of many attempts to document, process, and share a year-plus long project, ev-ent-anglement: a multi-temporal, many-sited, process-rich, collaborative investigation of learning, making and living in feminist social networks, no matter how messy.

    2. This talk is one of many attempts to document, process, and share a year-plus long project, ev-ent-anglement. It will be rocky because the corporate internet is so smooth. An ev-ent-anglment cuts and pastes participant’s fragments into the digital record of an event and also takes account of the bleed. How do we do this? We begin by thinking about cutting and pasting in gendered terms, and in relation to power.

  • The ev-ent-anglement uses two hyphens as highly visible stitches to see the suture connecting events with entanglements: ev-ent-anglement. An event is not one: it is the speaker’s words, the audience’s thoughts and attitudes, the images on the screen/s, the electricity and hardware that puts those images there, the smell of the room, the culture of the institutional host, the many cultures of the participants and the ways and means of the surrounding city. Neither is an entanglement one: it is the things, people, energies, affects, and ideas that bundle. The experiment is unfolding here and now and also at ev-ent-anglement.com and cells.ev-ent-anglement.com. You can cut/paste in at any time or place with a simple hashtag.


    2. #ev-ent-anglement considers how or if affect flows within on/offline queer/feminist spaces because I am concerned that many of our current digital practices are not yet as grounded as we deserve. It believes that we can learn from doing, and that we can do better.
  • The ev-ent-anglement is a living experiment that demonstrates in the doing the confusions, differences, and affordances of contemporary corporate Internet culture and one possible feminist alternative.

    2. The ev-ent-anglement attempts to use technology to collectively cut/paste+bleed our fragments with principled, self-aware, grounded gestures that add up and move on. The seeping and connecting quality of all blood allows it to be a metaphoric glue, like affect, that marks the many pulls, movements, and actions of any entanglement.
  • There have been six ev-ent-anglements with hundreds of participants contributing their digital fragments. The first was in Utrecht; the most recent at NYU; with five stops along the way. Now we are here @CUNY.

    2. unlike much on the Internet, our community is limited, our database is small, the ideas and things gathered are complex and deep, to know what is here demands time, and your presence is generative.
  • 1. The project traveled the globe, considering how we might do better with the uncountable fragments of ourselves that we willingly, massively and generatively give to the man with every tweet, click, and photo. Of course, in many ways, those smiles are for me, and also for you.

    2. In the ev-ent-anglement every gift is an object—whether people, places, or thing—and every object can be entangled with others initiating a bleed. When you participate, you become an object, too. That shouldn’t be easy, or really even “fun.”
  • The ev-ent-anglement, here today, and always also elsewhere online, asks instead: what if we gave them, that is bits of ourselves, to each other? You can give me and us a fragment of yourself with a hashtag or by hand at any time, as have many before you. After that it becomes an object for my and our use.

    The project attempts to mark that every simple cut/paste in a corporate environment has an unseen but sometimes felt consequence, a violence, and a power. Take an image or word from one place and put it somewhere else, especially in a platform owned and used by the man to sell you yourself, and there are consequences. My project imagines different outcomes based on the same logic.

  • From KJ
  • From Yoko Ono’s Cut Piece
  • From Eva
  • From Jih-Fei
  • 1. Today’s talk will have an irregular peripetetic repetitive looping construction and execution to honor the practices and findings of the project that aim to mark the unseen violence and the possible potential of the willy-nilly usually corporate-owned movement of the digital fragments of ourselves that we cut/paste at will. I hope to mark the bleed.

    2. A lot of data and affect and ideas were mobilized and shared in the ev-ent-anglement. As much as this is and has been, my data collection is irrelevant, small, and managable in the face of corporate data sets, like the others we generate @Facebook, @Twitter, etc. This talk is one possible structure to hold and process that what I received, over a year and in many places, including the internet, was more than one person could handle and yet speaks with a coherence that puts big data sets to shame.
  • 1. The talk has an irregular structure to mark that difficulty of use, odd beauty, and weird poetry are each important possible formats by which to make visible and then restructure our fragments into more ethical collections.

    2. While ev-ent-anglement certainly ended up being about too many things—an effect of its many instantiations in different environments, its ever growing collection of participant-made materials, and the creative collaborations that wouldn’t settle—one of its most central concerns remained the question of how and if affect moves. We often thought about this in relation to the digital—that is to say, objects could be easily digitized and shared and re-shown, but feelings and sentiments and bodies, not so much.
  • Things will be awkward, ungainly, difficult to follow, and in as many vernaculars as are the objects it received so as to honor the way we talk and write in feminist, and other, social networks: in tweets, captions, theory, poetry, comments, slogans, manifestoes, and quotations. It’s okay to get lost in the flow. I promise a full and utter return.

    2. The ev-ent-anglement’s generous participants gifted me their digital fragments as I requested, and this was, as the event and its infrastructure required, necessarily quick, fleeting, through a flip of the hand, a click of the camera. But I have learned, and hope that I am showing here and now, that some of the meat of our encounter was entangled in those techie gestures, too, showing up as care, as fragility, proximity, shadow, and touch.
  • Get ready! Get funky. This will be rocky because the corporate internet is so smooth.
  • In the summer of 2015, Dr. Alanna Thain brought some of us to Montreal for a seminar, Affective Encounters, the affect of which I will soon try to collaboratively, thoughtfully, re-render here in the form of 22 cut-ups: an unfeeling method that speaks in other ways. In Montreal, as in Utrecht, Dehli, Dublin, and Los Angeles, the participants were a closed, committed group of feminist scholars, artists and activists. During my talk, participants bravely took up my call, generating the photos and words that make up the 22 cuts ups that will soon follow. The 22 cut ups are entirely fabricated from fragments collected for the project, almost all of them in Montreal where I asked the scholars of affect to attempt to show or share with fragments the affect of Montreal and/or their theories of feminist affect in Montreal. I composed the cut-ups by randomly linking photos gifted to me with a hashtag with fragments of words also gifted to me or that I have found generative for this project. I did this through a mechanic procedure of my own device and making use of the technologies of paper and scissors. I then used Photoshop to cut/paste photos and words into randomized clusters, or cut-ups. All extraneous, contextual, connecting, sense-making materials (like who made the photo, or where the words came from, or what I thought of all this) were put elsewhere, so as to keep the cut-ups pure, more like how we encounter objects on the internet. Today I will read some of this information on the second pass of the cut-ups—that’s right, you will see the whole PowerPoint twice--thereby producing a “shadow archive” of explanatory underwriting. Throughout the project, I call this necessary, but often left undone or unseen after-affect of digital cutting and pasting, the bleed. Giving you a second round of reading of the same 22 cut-ups should help you to see what is lost and gained from every cut and paste. What I call the bleed, an idea that many of the Montreal participants (and others) attempted to show with their gifts.

    2. Something is seen, felt and known in this flat vast place. Something felt remains. Because, it seems, we have more than representation. Our bodies remember the encounter, and our weird poetry captures something of what we were.
  • CUT UP 1: Learning/practicing (1): the difference between spontaneous emotions and educated feelings. (@intheintervals) … Yes, there is something that exceeds the mimetic copy of some part of yourself or others—so effortlessly passed along as a digital fragment. We have affect in the network: our bodies, and poetry, and pictures, dance, words and humor as reminder, and as mediums, to get us ever closer to that uncapturable evanescent event.


    2. Professors Rault and Juhasz cooling off in Montreal. We danced all night. We stayed up late. We revealed what might be hidden due to rules of professional procedure.

    This photo was tweeted by @AgingSuperModel with the words: “Feminist collectivity as the shadow archive of contemporary academic culture.” It was re-tweeted by Jasmine rault: “Eactly! #eventanglement #montreal.”
  • CUT Up 2: Of course the contemporary act of self-cutting, like editing, can be understood in gendered terms: a violent act of power-seeking performed in yet another of those private places allocated to women in patriarchy. Self-cutting does not bring with it an associated paste. What this cut brings with it, what it wants, its dyadic, is a bleed … echnologies, like people, slide over some things, stick others together, allow for friction, cuts, pain and pleasure. Parts of us stay put, others travel on. … Feminist Work is not seamless.


    Cut up two: The violence of this cut comes from disjuncture. An abrasion in form and content. CUT UP 1 enjoyed a natural flow—elegance, eloquence birthed from a nimble collective intelligence. The bleed—my attempt here to ease and mark the rough transition between the cut/paste that randomly connects fragments from Montreal—indicates the violence, the power, ownership, and uses of the definitive disruptions of social media that are expertly hidden in the effortless cuts and pastes of the digital.
  • CUT UP 3: quiet

    This is my least favorite doubling. Sure, both images are “about” drinking, glassware, objects that hold and allow release. But the cool clarity of Figure 3, its diffident linking of thumb and glass, how it coldly harkens a coming sound, its cruel contextlessness, rubs the wrong way against Figure 4 (gifted by the same tweeter), an image of the blurry blue warmth of the social that actually was. The artificial flow of these images is not entirely contrived. We were all at the same place at the same time: Montreal and its almost-same-time digital renderings on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and my own ev-ent-anglement. It was intense and coherent: intellectually, socially. Given that these two images come from Dayna McLoed, who proved to be one of my most active Montreal interlocutors, linking them through a random cut/paste makes some easy sense.

    Dayna tweets: “The haptic in the encounter as a feminist action. #montreal #eventanglement.”
  • CUT UP 4: I feel annoyed to be watching the clock to get my kid from daycare. I was so happy when you said you loved “The Argonauts,” and then squirmily delighted when you said smart generous things to me after I presented. Very sweaty most of today. I’m curious about everyone’s love lives, as always.


    I tweeted this photo, a still from Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, by David Lynch, 1992, after Alanna Thain gave a talk on dance in Lynch.
    Jenny writes about delight and love. A couple is moved. In both images, or through their artificial pairing, I doubly know the residual pull of bodies: to and against each other. An excess zig-zag stressing buzzy attraction; a gravitational pull towards connection. With stasis. Movement without touch. Squirmy, sweaty hope for more.
  • CUT UP 5: So we wait for our bodies to appear, we wait in the gaps, or cuts, or silhouettes of time; we wait, we exist, and create. (@Komiksgrrrl) … Feminist collectivity as the shadow archive of contemporary academic culture.
    (@Aging SuperModel)

    This is a Screengrab of Dr. Selmin Kara’s Facebook.
    I do not think of Facebook as a shadow archive. It is glaring, bright, screaming, tight. Joy from a distance. But @AgingSuperModel’s tweet was about something else entirely, not Facebook. Her words were cut violently and moved to another image by my machinic process. Now cut/paste elsewhere, they serve to worry for all Internet fragments, stripped of the place they started, ripped of the affect they stored, generating new feelings and meanings, maybe ruining some of the fun even as this creates other intensities.

  • CUT UP 6: I use the concept of “Egyptian feeling” as a named, circulated and sticky emotion, where the cultural, political and biological aspects of emotions merge together. (Anu Laukkanen)

    I tweeted this photo with the words: “Ingrid Ryberg: Eva & Maria. Rare lgbt film from Sweden. #eventanglement #montreal #affect.”
    I think of most tweeted captions as ungainly blemishes attempting to suture ceaseless countless cheap portraits into some sensical semblance to honor our presence and loss.
  • CUT UP 7: quiet

    2. I imagine this is Dayna’s private, now public, multi-format guide for possible cut structures for a video art project that I can’t know. I have grown to love how it pours downward into the next photo’s mirror of gravitational pull and palette.

  • CUT UP 8: quiet

    Cut up 8: I am wearing the yellow-green work-dress I’d rather be caught dead in much later that night dancing at queer bars peopled by younger people and even later still while relaxing on the curb. On many many further looks at this photo, seeing beyond my arresting aesthetic reactions to color and composition, I realize that someone has caught Jenny and I in the very conversation that she so fittingly describes now sutured to Cut Up 4.

  • CUT UP 9: Perhaps people stay in places because they live or lived some place? And yet we move on: for each small paste holds another cut it seems … Facebook #eventanglement #montreal #AffectiveEncounter @ev-ent-angle… Cuts are part of the phenomena they help produce,” writes Karen Barad.


    From Marta Zarzycka’s Facebook with words: “As Affective Encounter workshop in Montreal draws to an end, my faith in feminist affective collaborative academic activist community is restored. It was a pleasure to spend this week with the most brilliant and generous scholars I’ve encountered in a long time. Maybe there IS joy in academia after all.“ @raultishness re-tweets image with: “Feminist joy.” @RentschlerC re-tweets and re-words: “The feminist feeling space! #eventanglement #Montreal #AffectiveEncounters.”
  • CUT UP 10: Alex argued to cut is to create a silhouette, which can serve as a visual signifier of what was once there but is not a lack. (@Komiksgrrrl) …Ordinary affects are public feelings that begin and end in broad circulation, but they are also the stuff that seemingly intimate lives are made of. They give circuits and flows the forms of a life. (Kathleen Stewart)


    What was once there and still is: joy. Feminist joy; feminist feeling space. A relaxed stance. Alanna’s flowing skirt and hair. Jenny’s back. A cake! Marta’s smile and laugh. Is it because I was there and I remember those flows here, yet another feminist feeling space? If you hadn’t been there could you feel the joy? Do words help smooth the way? Cover the cracks? Do we prefer joy with digital distance?

  • CUT UP 11: Cut ups are for everyone. Anybody can make cut ups. It is experimental in the sense of being something to do. … The use of scissors renders the process explicit and subject to extension and variation. (William Burroughs)

    Jodi Dean writes: “Insofar as affect, as movement, designates the doubling of an image, utterance, perception, or sound into itself as something else, we can account for the affective discharge of reflexivized communication. The additive dimension of communication for its own sake designates an excess. This excess isn’t a new meaning or perspective. It doesn’t refer to a new content. It is rather the intensity accrued from the repetition, the excitement or thrill of more.”
  • CUT UP 12: fritzlechat. Sag.brunette. Agnoeats. Financedeavors and onmimontreal like this. Lantalani eventalgement exits and enters #affective Encouters #Montreal. … #eventanglement values feminist complexity, community, and collaboration outside the logic of capital, when possible. … There is something that exceeds the mimentic copy of some part of yourself or otters


    Walter Benjamin writes: “‘The illiterate of the future,’ it has been said, ‘will not be the man who cannot read the alphabet, but the one who cannot take a photograph.’ But must we not also count as illiterate the photographer who cannot read his own pictures? Will not the caption become the most important component of the shot?”

  • CUT UP 13:I want to try to cut myself and my events back together with a feminist ethic that links deeper, farther, and truer to previous knowledge and current context, to communities and audiences, and to the ideas and analyses that matter to us. That links me to you in a feminist entanglement that links you to me, if you’re ready and willing to seep in that is.

    Alanna Thain’s shadow in photo tweeted by TL Cowan quoting herself: “Feminist Collectives as Shadow Archive of feminism in contemporary university.


  • CUT UP 14: I begin with the messiness of the experiential, the unfolding of bodies into worlds, and what I have called “the drama of contingency,” how we are touched by what comes near. (Sara Ahmed) … Please try to bleed at minimum

    William Burroughs writes: “In writing this chapter I have used what I call ‘the fold in’ method that is I place a page of one text folded down the middle on a page of another text (my own or someone else’s).
  • CUT UP 15: What is the glue that inspires or captivates an audience to assemble linger, and act?

    “2 Weeks. 2 feminist Workshops. 1 manicure #WhatSticks #WhatChips #FemTechNet #AffectiveEncounters #eventanglement.” Tweeted by @AgingSuperModel
  • CUT UP 16: Those queer pleasures & feminist politics that drew us into academia might yet survive. (@raultishness)

    To the left. Sexy Prowl.
    To the right. Death Spiral.
  • CUT UP 17: Yes here, like all travelers who must return home eventually, we have only representation to mark and remake our connections, our history–photos, songs, words, and the affect embedded perhaps therein–and it works! Something is seen, felt and known in this flat vast place. Something felt remains. Because, it seems, we have more than representation. Our bodies remember the encounter, and our weird poetry captures something of what we were and what you and I want me to be.

    It seems that we can stich together powerful, empowering fragments of ourselves, outside the logic of capital, when we are linked-by-choice within coherent communities that share an explicit, flexible, intellectual, bodily, social, spatial practice.
  • CUT UP 18: I suppose I'm trying to think through that notion of cutting as something that creates new forms of meaning with absence. (@Komiksgrrrl)

    New forms of meaning with absence.
    .
  • CUT UP 19: I remember the wildness of 15 from the inside. I could do anything fucking anything. (Jenny Burman). #eventanglement #montreal #affectiveEncoutners . Motreal Script in 3 acts: use #eventanglement #montreal to cut/paste+bleed

    Ayanna Dozier who is Komicksgrrl is caught in the break. With a shadow.
  • CUT UP 20: fragilization // politics of care // movements // temporalities. (@intheintervals) . The most interesting aspect of the image, in other words, is the way that it is not simply itself but is itself plus a nugget or shadow or trace of intensity. An image is itself and more.
    Cut up 20: I will admit, I love my cut-ups. Our cut/pastes are generative for me because place, context, complexity, time, shared goals and vernacular are live in the network, even as we take account of the bleed: the productive, painful violence that is the cost of movement, connection, and cutting. The cut-ups produce a “feminist feeling space” that travels with complexity and clarity between shadow, paper, digital, professional and personal archives, rendering something (again) at once like and also different from #AffectiveEncounters in #Montreal.
    I worry that only I feel this love, and decide that’s okay. I forgive myself and the project. I have felt that much of ev-ent-anglement has been a failure: too complicated, too sprawling, too diffuse, too different, too weird. And yet, experimental intellectual activism sometimes allows us to see, to render, what is otherwise obscured by the protocals of corporate participation. My participants, connected by my methods and desire—and sometimes their own—collectively produced a way to think about, see and feel affect in a/our network. I tell you, I love it even so.
  • CUT UP 21:We are moved by things. And in being moved, we make things. (Sara Ahmed) The ev-ent-anglement considers how and what we can save, pass, know, and be moved by, together, on the Internet and in the world: how affect moves in feminist networks.


    I’m caught again catching in the act. Wanting more than I deserve.
  • CUT UP 22: An affective approach to images requires a close understanding of the different layers through which a body operates as an image among other images.

    Cut up 22: This photo was found lodged inside my used copy of Everyday Affect, functioning for the book’s previous owner (the woman with blue eye-shadow and shiny shoulders?) perhaps as a bookmark. With no anchoring text of its own except for the place in the book it itself once anchored, this once maybe-precious or only-functional photo, its woman and (her?) child, are ever leveled in the darkness. Remembered here, forgotten still, my photo of her photo replicated here as our image reminds me of the violence and the beauty of free-floating signifiers, of bodies as images and people as texts, of affect as code and networks as glue: and the bleed of it all.
  • 1 We experience entangled events with people, places, technologies and things that register affect. We try to save and pass some of this on for ourselves and others using more technologies. What sticks in the network? What chips? What stays clear as the light of day and what lives best in the shadows? How do we account for what seeps out or bleeds between networked relays of affect? Is affect in Montreal different from #affect in #Montreal?

    2. If the Internet is an unorchestrated archive of fragments of all our selves being mined to sell us more things we never needed, we might want to take on the empowering feminist role of editor and curate ourselves, together, into a collection that matters, at least for a minute.
  • Cut-ups demand a machine logic, not simply the machine as a tool to (more easily) render montage practices or thinking, say like a re-mix. By machine logic I mean one that is cool, detached, uncaring, disconnected. An arbitrary or inhuman cut carries the particular violence or jolt of thoughtlessness, contextlessness, and the inability to judge what is precious and tender from that which is not. So much of social media now functions with this sense of cut-up. Algorhythms cut+paste once precious things with no attention to human feeling and maximum interest in corporate greed. Perhaps with a data set made with and for feminist social networks; with a data set made to feel; even cut-ups speak with coherence and care. I suggest that we need to define and refine the rules of feminist social networks to better reflect our histories, theories, processes, use of technologies and commitments for the social. We need to take account of the bleed.

    2. Every cut is a beginning and a doing. A doing of something and a something new. One fragment ends, another launches, hanging there beside what came before it, just on the other side of the brink, loudly commencing its rocky unroll.

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