Online Teaching and Learning - Basic Concepts

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Workshop presented at the 2013 CTJ TEFL Seminar

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  • Give them those things in a clear, easily understandable way…
  • Give them those things in a clear, easily understandable way…
  • Give them those things in a clear, easily understandable way…
  • Give them those things in a clear, easily understandable way…
  • Give them those things in a clear, easily understandable way…
  • Give them those things in a clear, easily understandable way…
  • Online Teaching and Learning - Basic Concepts

    1. 1. ONLINE TEACHING AND LEARNING BASIC CONCEPTS Evania A. Netto Vinícius V. Lemos
    2. 2. AGENDA In this workshop: • we will discuss the facts and myths about online education; • we will be shown a learning platform and how it works; • instructors and participants will come up with a list of skills that teachers and learners need to have in order to teach and learn online; • instructors will present the concept of online presence and online interaction and participants will find ways to achieve them in a course; • we will reflect about what has been seen throughout the session and discuss whether participants would like to become online teachers or not.
    3. 3. DISTANCE EDUCATION
    4. 4. “Distance education is a learning modality planned by educators and institutions in which teachers and students are separated by space and several different information and communication technologies are used.” (MATTAR, 2011).
    5. 5. “Distance education includes the various forms of study at all levels which are not under the continuous, immediate supervision of tutors present with their students in lecture rooms or on the same premises, but which, nevertheless, benefit from the planning, guidance and tuition of a tutorial organization.” (HOLMBERG, 1986).
    6. 6. • Online courses aren’t as good as face- to-face (F2F) courses. • Technology plays the most important role in online programs. • It is nearly impossible to promote interaction among participants involved in distance education. Truth or myth?
    7. 7. • It is much easier and less time consuming to teach an online course than a F2F course. • Students taking an English online course cannot practice the 4 skills. • The typical average online course is self- paced, meaning that you can finish it at any point during the semester. Truth or myth?
    8. 8. • Online courses aren’t as good as face-to- face courses. • Technology plays the most important role in online programs. • It is nearly impossible to promote interaction among participants involved in distance education.
    9. 9. • It is much easier and less time consuming to teach an online course than a f2f course. • Students taking an English online course cannot practice the 4 skills. • The typical average online course is self- paced, meaning that you can finish it at any point during the semester.
    10. 10. • Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlJshzOv2cw Facts about e-learning
    11. 11. http://courses.thomas.org.br
    12. 12. LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS
    13. 13. 2 minutes
    14. 14. Source: http://www.onlinecolleges.com/infographics/profile-online-college-student.html
    15. 15. What do you think the successful online student is like? What are the necessary skills? 2 minutes
    16. 16. Source: http://www.onlinecolleges.com/infographics/profile-online-college-student.html
    17. 17. When we think of online courses we tend to think of a different teacher’s profile. Do you think that the roles of teachers are truly different in the virtual world? How? 3 minutes
    18. 18. NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR QUALITY ONLINE TEACHING - INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR K-12 ONLINE LEARNING
    19. 19. •K–12 is a designation for the sum of primary and secondary education. It is used in the US, Canada, Australia and other countries. The expression is a shortening of kindergarten (K) for 4–6-year-olds through twelfth grade (12) for 18–19-year-olds, the first and last grades of public education in these countries.
    20. 20. Look at the K-12 standards. What do you think of them? Are they too different from the requirements necessary to teach F2F? Do you already have those skills? 5 minutes
    21. 21. 1. The online teacher knows the primary concepts and structures of effective online instruction and is able to create learning experiences to enable student success. http://www.inacol.org/resources/publications/national-quality-standards/
    22. 22. 2. The online teacher understands and is able to use a range of technologies, both existing and emerging, that effectively support student learning and engagement in the online environment. http://www.inacol.org/resources/publications/national-quality-standards/
    23. 23. 3. The online teacher plans, designs, and incorporates strategies to encourage active learning, application, interaction, participation, and collaboration in the online environment. http://www.inacol.org/resources/publications/national-quality-standards/
    24. 24. 4. The online teacher promotes student success through clear expectations, prompt responses, and regular feedback. http://www.inacol.org/resources/publications/national-quality-standards/
    25. 25. 5. The online teacher models, guides, and encourages legal, ethical, and safe behavior related to technology use. http://www.inacol.org/resources/publications/national-quality-standards/
    26. 26. 6. The online teacher is cognizant of the diversity of student academic needs and incorporates accommodations into the online environment. http://www.inacol.org/resources/publications/national-quality-standards/
    27. 27. 7. The online teacher demonstrates competencies in creating and implementing assessments in online learning environments in ways that ensure validity and reliability of the instruments and procedures. http://www.inacol.org/resources/publications/national-quality-standards/
    28. 28. 8. The online teacher develops and delivers assessments, projects, and assignments that meet standard-based learning goals and assesses learning progress by measuring student achievement of the learning goals. http://www.inacol.org/resources/publications/national-quality-standards/
    29. 29. 9. The online teacher demonstrates competency in using data from assessments and other data sources to modify content and to guide student learning. http://www.inacol.org/resources/publications/national-quality-standards/
    30. 30. 10. The online teacher interacts in a professional, effective manner with colleagues, parents, and other members of the community to support students’ success. http://www.inacol.org/resources/publications/national-quality-standards/
    31. 31. 11. The online teacher arranges media and content to help students and teachers transfer knowledge most effectively in the online environment. http://www.inacol.org/resources/publications/national-quality-standards/
    32. 32. DROPOUT
    33. 33. “Many students are not prepared to manage their activities in flexible times without direct supervision. Many learners are used to having teachers as a visible support. They wait for the teacher to tell them what to do”. (ARANTES; MORAN & VALENTE, 2011).
    34. 34. “Many students come from schools that were not very demanding, thus couldn`t develop their intellectual and digital autonomy. Entering silent virtual environments, full of materials and tools make them confused. The lack of a conversation with real people, live, f2f, scares them. The digital environment for those who are not used to it is very confusing, distant, little intuitive or pleasant. The pedagogical experiences are very different from the ones popular in the past.” (ARANTES; MORAN & VALENTE, 2011).
    35. 35. Source: http://www.onlinecolleges.com/infographics/profile-online-college-student.html
    36. 36. THE ROLE OF PRESENCE IN ONLINE ENVIRONMENTS
    37. 37. Think for a minute. What is the basic difference between learning f2f and learning exclusively online? The difference is the separation between the teacher and the learner and among the learners.
    38. 38. “Separation among teacher and learners leads to a feeling of isolation on the part of the teacher and learner and has been a major reason for learner dissatisfaction and lack of retention in the online environments.” (PALLOF & PRATT, 2007)
    39. 39. What can be done to avoid the feeling of isolation in online courses? Create the feeling of “Being There” and “Being Together”. (LEHMAN & CONCEICAO, 2010)
    40. 40. • The feeling of “Being There” is related to telepresence and makes the learners have the impression or feeling that they are present at a location remote from their own environment.(LEHMAN;CONCEICAO, 2010) • The feeling of “Being Together” is related to social presence and allows learners to feel that they are part of a community and can interact with the other members of this community. (LEHMAN; CONCEICAO, 2010)
    41. 41. Source: NETTO, E.; 2012 Being There Being Together
    42. 42. Source: http://ml.vu/LfRqmo
    43. 43. Source: http://www.stixy.com/guest/227070
    44. 44. INTERACTION
    45. 45. According to Moore (1989), there can be three kinds of interactions in online programs. What are they? What can you do to promote them in your course?
    46. 46. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zv-_GCFdLdo
    47. 47. The Nazca Lines are a series of ancient geoglyphs located in the Nazca Desert in Peru. The lines are shallow designs made in the ground and include from simple lines to stylized animals. Scholars believe they were drawn between 400 and 650 AD. In your opinion, who drew them? http://www.thinglink.com/scene/273799594700177409?buttonSource=undefinedPage I think that the lines could have been made by ETs who came to Earth many years ago (Erika) .
    48. 48. •Now, we would like to hear from you! Is there anything you would like to share with us? Do you think you would like to become an online teacher? Why (not)?
    49. 49. REFERENCES • ARANTES, V. A. ; MORAN, J. M. ; VALENTE, J. A. Educação a distância: Pontos e Contrapontos. 1. ed. São Paulo: Summus, 2011. v. 1. p. 136. • HOLMBERG, B. Growth and structure of distance education. Beckenham, UK: Croom Helm, 1986. • LARREAMENDY-JOERNS, J.; LEINHARDT, G. Going the distance with online education. Review of Educational Research,v.76, n.4, p.567–605, 2006. • LEHMAN, R.; CONCEICAO, S. Creating a Sense of Presence in Online Teaching: How to "Be There" for Distance Learners. In JOSSEY-BASS. Guides to Online Teaching and Learning. San Francisco, CA: Wiley Imprint, 2010. • MOORE, M. Three types of interaction. American Journal of Distance Education, USA, v. 3, n. 2, 1989, p. 1–6. • MATTAR, J. Interatividade e aprendizagem. In: LITTO, F.; FORMIGA, M. (org.). Educação a distância: o estado da arte. São Paulo: Pearson Education do Brasil. 2009, p.112-120. • ______. Guia de Educação a distância . São Paulo: Cengage Learning, 2011. • PALLOF, R. & PRATT, K. Building online learning communities: Effective strategies for the virtual classroom. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2007.
    50. 50. Thank you!! • evanianetto@hotmail.com • vvlemos@hotmail.com

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