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Introduction to Email Fraud

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Introduction to Email Fraud

  1. 1. Introduction to Email Fraud
  2. 2. What is email fraud? • There are many types of fraud, and email is an inexpensive and popular method for distributing fraudulent messages to potential victims.
  3. 3. Lottery Winner Scam • People typically receive a message stating that they have won a foreign lottery or sweepstakes.
  4. 4. Work-at-home schemes • The scam: You'll pay a small fee to get started in the envelope-stuffing business. Then, you'll learn that the email sender never had real employment to offer. Instead, you'll get instructions on how to send the same envelope-stuffing ad in your own bulk emailing.
  5. 5. Health and diet scams • Pills that let you lose weight without exercising or changing your diet, herbal formulas that liquefy your fat cells so that they are absorbed by your body, and cures for impotence and hair loss are among the scams flooding email boxes. They Don’t Work!!!
  6. 6. Credit repair • Credit repair scams offer to erase accurate negative information from your credit file so you can qualify for a credit card, auto loan, home mortgage, or a job.
  7. 7. Vacation prize promotions • Electronic certificates congratulating you on "winning" a fabulous vacation for a very attractive price are among the scams arriving in your email. Some say you have been "specially selected" for this opportunity.
  8. 8. “Phishing” • “Phishers” send an email or pop-up message that claims to be from a business or organization that you may deal with — for example, an Internet service provider (ISP), bank, online payment service, or even a government agency. The messages direct you to a website that looks just like a legitimate organization’s site.
  9. 9. More on Phishing: Tips on how to avoid being caught • If you get an email or pop-up message that asks for personal or financial information, do not reply. And don’t click on the link in the message, either.
  10. 10. Phishing: And government agencies • Phishers are fond of impersonating government agencies… and the BBB!
  11. 11. An interesting point about fraud is that it is a crime in which you decide on whether to participate. If an email seems to good to be true, delete it. Contact the Tri-State BBB if you have any additional questions. info@evansville.bb.org 5401 Vogel Rd. Suite 410 Evansville, IN 47715 812-473-0202 or 800-359-0979

Editor's Notes

  • As more and more people begin to use email as a primary form of communication, the possibilities for fraud increase. The following slides will outline the most common email scams.
  • Sometime during this scam you could expect to be asked for your bank or some other information that could give the scammers access to your funds. Although this scam is typically very easy to spot by anyone who knows what to look for, it is often extremely easy to be drawn into a scam like this hoping that it just might be real.
  • If you earn any money, it will be from others who fall for the scheme you're perpetuating.
  • Beware of case histories from "cured" consumers claiming amazing results; testimonials from "famous" medical experts you've never heard of; claims that the product is available from only one source or for a limited time; and ads that use phrases like "scientific breakthrough," "miraculous cure," "exclusive product," "secret formula," and "ancient ingredient."
  • The scam artists who promote these services can't deliver. Only time, a deliberate effort, and a personal debt repayment plan will improve your credit. The companies that advertise credit repair services appeal to consumers with poor credit histories. Not only can't they provide you with a clean credit record, but they also may be encouraging you to violate federal law.
  • Most unsolicited commercial email goes to thousands or millions of recipients at a time. Often, the cruise ship you're booked on may look more like a tug boat. The hotel accommodations likely are shabby, and you may be required to pay more for an upgrade. Scheduling the vacation at the time you want it also may require an additional fee.
  • The message may ask you to “update,” “validate,” or “confirm” your account information. Some phishing emails threaten a dire consequence if you don’t respond. But it isn’t. It’s a bogus site whose sole purpose is to trick you into divulging your personal information so the operators can steal your identity and run up bills or commit crimes in your name.
  • Legitimate companies don’t ask for this information via email. If you are concerned about your account, contact the organization mentioned in the email using a telephone number you know to be genuine, or open a new Internet browser session and type in the company’s correct Web address yourself.
  • The US government does not contact individuals via email regarding taxes or benefits.
  • con artists are very persuasive, using all types of excuses, explanations, and offers to lead you – and your money - away from common sense.
    Hanging up the phone or not responding to shady mailings or emails makes it difficult for the scammer to commit fraud.
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