1
Why Europeana?
JCDL, 23 July 2012, Indianapolis
2008-2012, Value to date:
Inspiration
Infrastructures
Interoperability
2013 onwards, Value to come:
Interoperability
Infra...
3
Background
Europeana was conceived in 2005 by a letter from 6 heads of State, led by the French
President Jaques Chirac,...
Vision:
Openly accessible digital cultural heritage will foster the
exchange of ideas and knowledge, lead to a better
mutu...
Strategic Plan 2011-2015
6
Phase 1:
infrastructures &
interoperability
7
Libraries
Europeana
Drents archief
Louvre
TEL
Museums
Archives
Bringing our heritage together in a uniform, interoperabl...
Aggregated
• 2300+ content
providers
• 73 aggregators
• 28 million objects
This required a strong Aggregation
infrastructu...
Network
• 750+ members
Strong network of activists and helpers
10
Content growth
This in turn has led to a spectacular growth in objects: currently over 28 million objects
in 32 languag...
11
Usage growthThere is a direct link between the amount of objects in the repository and the amount of
visits to the site...
12
Data interoperability
13
The portal www.europeana.eu is the most visible expression of this united Europe.
14
Phase 2: 2012
Distribution
15
The second phase of our work has focussed on making the material more accessible to
individuals, professionals and crea...
16
In order to target new and different customer segments we needed to make the
material accessible through a wide variety...
17
API growthThe effect of the change in license was felt immediately: currently over 770
organisations (commercial and no...
18
This has enabled us to make our culture available on a wide variety of services,
resulting in increased visibility of c...
19
Why Europeana?
Conclusions so far
20
Impact 1
Europeana supports economic growth: Creative Industries in Europe are growing
fast (estimated 7% per annum) an...
21
Impact 2
Europeana connects Europe (and the wider world): open, democratised access to
culture helps all communities ac...
22
23
Impact 3Europeana makes Europe’s culture available for everyone: By making all 27 million
records available under a Cre...
Vision:
Openly accessible digital cultural heritage will foster the
exchange of ideas and knowledge, lead to a better
mutu...
Why Europeana?
27
Cost-Benefit analysis
28*See appendix 2
29*See appendix 2
30*See appendix 2
31
Areas of potential
revenue
Sponsorship
Joint ventures
Incubator
Ministries
Premium membership
services
Foundations
Adve...
32
Europeana Incubator
We conducted an #Allez Culture campaign
34
Support #Allezculture!
7.500 + signed petitions
4.800 + tweets #allezculture #europeana
>9.000.000 + views on twitter
3...
35
Support
http://blog.europeana.eu/2013/06/linked-across-borders-and-time-travelling-exhi
In this blog, Famous Bulgarian ...
36
Support
Speaking at the Europeana Conference as part of the Irish presidency,
Jimmy Deenihan, Irish Minister for the Ar...
37
38
tourism
63 M
research
+
Education
+
Creativity
+
38
culture
22.7
M
Europeana is extremely well positioned as a catalyst...
39
In order to realise this potential the Europeana DSI will provide services on 4 different
levels: Aggregation, Facilita...
40
Services for
Cultural
Institutions
1. Europeana will provide value-added services that allow the Cultural sector to do ...
41
Extending licensing
framework
2. Europeana will co-ordinate solutions for pan- European accessibility issues such as
cr...
42
Incubation
Services
3. Europeana will develop a service centre for the creative industries and cultural
entrepreneurs. ...
43
4. Europeana will develop community based end user services, that allow users to
access validated content through stron...
44
Spin- off effects
Data Model
Access rights
Networking
model
DSI DSI DSI
Europeana has proven to be a strong contributor...
We are gaining ground. We need 3 skittles lined up:
1. European Parliament voted for us,
2. European Council is supporting...
47
Jill Cousins
jill.cousins@kb.nl
@JilCos
Thank you
47
Why Europeana, 23 Jul 2013
Why Europeana, 23 Jul 2013
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  • This title could just as well be Why the DPLA or why German Digital Library, It is a question that we rightly have to answer, not least because we should constantly be providing value for money and a return on investment. It is however a question for which the answer now is slightly different to the answer we would have given at the beginning or even 2 years ago. Changed due to 3 major drivers: technology for instance the phones we have, the tablets, Cloud computing access which has altered user needs and desires and economics - where libraries, archives, museums are struggling to survive and spending cuts are the norm. Not all digital libraries will follow the same continuum as Europeana, different paths will be taken at the cross roads presented to them but being able to answer the question of Why helps focus the direction of travel and certainly helps in obtaining funding.
  • So today I want to look at what Europeana did to answer the why question from 2007-2013, what are the tangible impacts and what it needs to do for the years to come
  • The very first answer to ‘Why Europeana’ was political. It lay in a defense against the perceived anglicisation of the web, the desire to reflect the multilingual, multicultural nature of Europe. It was a grand vision.
  • At launch it was to create social and economical capital
  • To do this we needed to aggregate data, make it work across different types of data, for different purposes, solve issues around multilingualism, hierarchical object representation, ensure it would work for onward distribution to where the user needed it, and engage users with it.
  • This has split into 2 phases.
  • the first
  • This has led to the creation of a strong infrastructure for the aggregation of cultural objects and a variety of ways to access this material online. We needed critical mass, consensus on how stuff could work together - very little of this was there in 2008. There were a couple of national aggregators Culture.fr being the most comprehensive, and one vertical digital library across Europe, The European Library. Europeana inspired many of the countries to create their own country versions of Europeana German Digital Library, Finnish Digital Library, Swedish Open Cultural Heritage, Hispana, CulturaItalia and led to the creation of vertical portals serving professional audiences and delivering their content to Europeana.
  • It has also needed a strong network of individuals to form task forces and solve technology, data and IPR issues to achieve standardisation, normalisation, cross border exchange, multilingual use etc. The Europeana Network continues to grow (currently 750+ members), and becoming more diverse: there are museums, libraries and archives, but also publishers, policy makers and creatives industries.
  • And decent, though not spectacular, traffic when benchmarked against other digital libraries.
  • And all this was supported by huge amounts of work on the data model and standardisation of data
  • The most visible aspect of all is the portal. If you like, this was the visual inspiration. but it had and has many flaws, not least how can one portal satisfy all the needs of all the different types of users for the material gathered. Will it work for the researcher in the digital humanities, does it provide the educational pathway for the schoolchild, can I find stuff about my town, or the town I am visiting. Even if the portal can do all of this, are we able to service it to comprehend the changing needs of the users, to make it work for each and every person? We thought that was not the Why of Europeana, so we have embarked on the second phase:
  • to make the material you can see in the portal work in sites the user already accesses, to inspire them in a context, to show the richness of their heritage via many platforms and services. to be ....part of wikipedia, accessible via Google, on the school platforms, in the tourist sites......
  • So that we can better cater to their specific needs.
  • Europeana is now the 3rd biggest traffic driver for the Rijksmuseum, the second for National Library of Spain, and the first for Manuscriptorium. We are now many websites and we have our own Europeana Open Culture App - iTunes
  • thats the role of the API and unfettered access to 27 million rights labelled items
  • Europeana brings people together across borders. 800 representatives of cultural institutions and creative industries across the domains and from all 28 member states. 27 million objects are available in Europeana in all European languages from all member states.
  • So - I know I am biased but I think we have delivered on the vision......we have Connecting Europe and making cultural heritage available for everyone and it has inspired a whole raft of other digital libraries within and without Europe
  • At the beginning of this year we were fairly smug. We were on track, lots to solve, huge amounts to do but it looked like we would get structural funding for 7 years, to become a “Digital Service Infrastructure”, under the Connecting Europe Facility - Fantastic Digital Library seen as Infrastructure!!! Now we could concentrate on our core strengths, providing the backbone for others to build on. The budget to do this was conceived as 30 million euros a year, 5-7 towards the operation of Europeana Foundation, its platform and services and the rest to continue to support the aggregators, the solving of issues related to digital libraries and the digitisation of material and other R&D projects related to digital libraries. But this was not to be..... or at least not in so generous a form Member States, the countries of the European Union voted for budget cuts in the EU’s multiannual framework budget and the area that was cut included digital services from 9 billion to 1 billion for 7 years. Asking for 30 million a year from a budget that also needs to cover safer internet, eGovernance, eHealth etc would no longer wash.
  • In April, the Commissioner requested a meeting and told us we were in competition with these other infrastructures and that not only did we need to prove that public money would get a decent return if it was spent on Europeana but that we needed to show that we could be self sustainable by 2020. So all the arguments we had assembled came into play but we had to step up the game -she wanted more concrete evidence of cost benefit of Europeana as a Digital Service Infrastructure, proof that the memory institutions and member states believed in Europeana and a strategic plan for 2015-2020 - by the end of June. So we went to work
  • The cost benefit analysis revealed
  • So we got some cost benefit analysis done
  • So how do we move into the next phase?
  • We looked at areas to generate revenue
  • Not going to look at the results of all these. We will publish our conclusions shortly - most are small amounts - we proved areas that would be difficult such as Advertising (insufficent eyeballs) or Foundations seeing the worth of a digital service infrastructure The one we are most excited about
  • And we conducted a hearts and minds campaign to get the memory institutions saying why culture was great and important, why Europeana was needed.
  • And we drafted the first version of a strategic plan
  • based on becoming a fully fledged digital service infrastructure, serving the needs of the content providers, the creative industry and society.
  • But that was only the beginning.
  • Why Europeana, 23 Jul 2013

    1. 1. 1 Why Europeana? JCDL, 23 July 2012, Indianapolis
    2. 2. 2008-2012, Value to date: Inspiration Infrastructures Interoperability 2013 onwards, Value to come: Interoperability Infrastructures Fuelling economic growth
    3. 3. 3 Background Europeana was conceived in 2005 by a letter from 6 heads of State, led by the French President Jaques Chirac, to the President of the European Commission, Mr. Barroso. Jacques ChiracAleksander KwasniewskiGerhard SchroederSilvio BerlusconiJosé Luis Rodriguez ZapateroFerenc Gyurcsany 3
    4. 4. Vision: Openly accessible digital cultural heritage will foster the exchange of ideas and knowledge, lead to a better mutual understanding of our cultural diversity and support a thriving knowledge economy in Europe -Council of Europe 2008-
    5. 5. Strategic Plan 2011-2015
    6. 6. 6 Phase 1: infrastructures & interoperability
    7. 7. 7 Libraries Europeana Drents archief Louvre TEL Museums Archives Bringing our heritage together in a uniform, interoperable way, for citizens across Europe to enjoy through a central point of access.
    8. 8. Aggregated • 2300+ content providers • 73 aggregators • 28 million objects This required a strong Aggregation infrastructure of digital libraries Domain Aggregators: • TEL • APEX • EUscreen • EFG • Linked Heritage
    9. 9. Network • 750+ members Strong network of activists and helpers
    10. 10. 10 Content growth This in turn has led to a spectacular growth in objects: currently over 28 million objects in 32 languages with all 28 member states represented.
    11. 11. 11 Usage growthThere is a direct link between the amount of objects in the repository and the amount of visits to the site. Large contributors such as France and Germany receive the largest proportion of the visits to the sites (portal, mobile, apps).
    12. 12. 12 Data interoperability
    13. 13. 13 The portal www.europeana.eu is the most visible expression of this united Europe.
    14. 14. 14 Phase 2: 2012 Distribution
    15. 15. 15 The second phase of our work has focussed on making the material more accessible to individuals, professionals and creative industries across Europe.
    16. 16. 16 In order to target new and different customer segments we needed to make the material accessible through a wide variety of services and therefore developed a more open licensing structure: the CC0 Public Domain dedication for metadata. 16
    17. 17. 17 API growthThe effect of the change in license was felt immediately: currently over 770 organisations (commercial and non-commercial have requested an API key, 66% of them are already implementing them in a variety of services.
    18. 18. 18 This has enabled us to make our culture available on a wide variety of services, resulting in increased visibility of cultural institutions and their holdings worldwide.
    19. 19. 19 Why Europeana? Conclusions so far
    20. 20. 20 Impact 1 Europeana supports economic growth: Creative Industries in Europe are growing fast (estimated 7% per annum) and they need fuel. Europeana provides that. To date 770 businesses, entrepreneurs, educational and cultural organisations are re-using our data in websites, apps and games..
    21. 21. 21 Impact 2 Europeana connects Europe (and the wider world): open, democratised access to culture helps all communities across Europe to understand the past and to appreciate cross-cultural differences. To date, 50.000 objects and stories have been collected relating to the First World War, 7,000 on 1989 from just Poland.
    22. 22. 22
    23. 23. 23 Impact 3Europeana makes Europe’s culture available for everyone: By making all 27 million records available under a Creative Commons Zero public domain dedication (CC0) Europe’s heritage becomes available for re-use for everyone, young and old. Our 13000 facebook followers and 60.000 subscribers to the newsletter testify that there is a big need for a level playing field for culture. <Add picture public domain charter>
    24. 24. Vision: Openly accessible digital cultural heritage will foster the exchange of ideas and knowledge, lead to a better mutual understanding of our cultural diversity and support a thriving knowledge economy in Europe -Council of Europe 2008-
    25. 25. Why Europeana?
    26. 26. 27 Cost-Benefit analysis
    27. 27. 28*See appendix 2
    28. 28. 29*See appendix 2
    29. 29. 30*See appendix 2
    30. 30. 31 Areas of potential revenue Sponsorship Joint ventures Incubator Ministries Premium membership services Foundations Advertising Revenue sharing services
    31. 31. 32 Europeana Incubator
    32. 32. We conducted an #Allez Culture campaign
    33. 33. 34 Support #Allezculture! 7.500 + signed petitions 4.800 + tweets #allezculture #europeana >9.000.000 + views on twitter 358 letters written to European Council & Parliament
    34. 34. 35 Support http://blog.europeana.eu/2013/06/linked-across-borders-and-time-travelling-exhi In this blog, Famous Bulgarian writer, Georgi Gospodinov, who was a special guest at the travelling exhibition launch said: ‘With projects like [Europeana], we can enter museums and their collections without effort but we can also grant those collections the opportunity to get right inside us. Europeana allows us to carry them along with us every day. We can have centuries of culture in our pocket – on our phones, on our computers. What we do with it is down to our own curiosity.’
    35. 35. 36 Support Speaking at the Europeana Conference as part of the Irish presidency, Jimmy Deenihan, Irish Minister for the Arts, heritage and the Gaeltacht, said ‘Europeana is a powerful tool to increase the capacity to experiment with cultural assets and to promote a powerful creative economy. [..] Europeana is at the forefront proving that by providing data sets for new digital applications cultural bodies can realise additional social and economic benefits, through real innovation and creativity.’
    36. 36. 37
    37. 37. 38 tourism 63 M research + Education + Creativity + 38 culture 22.7 M Europeana is extremely well positioned as a catalyst of change, a Digital Service Infrastructure that can reduce costs of accessibility, fuel a burgeoning creative economy, and realise spin-off effects in other sectors. DSI 87.32 M
    38. 38. 39 In order to realise this potential the Europeana DSI will provide services on 4 different levels: Aggregation, Facilitation, Distribution and Engagement. 39
    39. 39. 40 Services for Cultural Institutions 1. Europeana will provide value-added services that allow the Cultural sector to do their work faster, cheaper and better, for example with cloud based hosting services and more efficient aggregation tools. 40 Impact: 22.7 million in cost reduction A unified repository of >100 million objects Funding required:
    40. 40. 41 Extending licensing framework 2. Europeana will co-ordinate solutions for pan- European accessibility issues such as cross-border access of content, ISO standards and improved interoperability of data, multilingualism, development of semantic web/LOD, e.g. to work with Google Knowledge Graph. 41 Impact: Shared practices for data modeling and IPR Strong spin-off potential in other industries Machine readable content for new services
    41. 41. 42 Incubation Services 3. Europeana will develop a service centre for the creative industries and cultural entrepreneurs. They will get easy access to free and licensed content, consultancy services, a network of entrepreneurs and venture capital and incubation services. 42 Impact: 60 million + in benefits Between 9 and 20 successful startups 20 + Europeana apps in appstores
    42. 42. 43 4. Europeana will develop community based end user services, that allow users to access validated content through strong community based platforms such as Wikipedia and thematic partner sites such as Europeana Fashion. Strategic partnership W ikipedia/GCI 43 Impact: Dramatically Increased visibility (on wiki 10 WW1 images = 9 million impressions) Increased participation
    43. 43. 44 Spin- off effects Data Model Access rights Networking model DSI DSI DSI Europeana has proven to be a strong contributor to the Digital Agenda for Europe. It provides European added value and supports economic growth, connects Europe and makes Europe’s culture available for everyone. It has strong spin- off potential for other sectors who will not have to invent the wheel again.44
    44. 44. We are gaining ground. We need 3 skittles lined up: 1. European Parliament voted for us, 2. European Council is supporting us 3. the Commissioner likes our direction of travel. #AllezCulture! We hope to be able to prove the latest ‘Why Europeana’ so that by 2020 we have a solid infrastructure supporting others, with new enterprises doing amazing things that ploughs money back into digital libraries.
    45. 45. 47 Jill Cousins jill.cousins@kb.nl @JilCos Thank you 47

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