2012 summer studio_Medical Center Design

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2012 Summer Studio at IIT(Illinois Institute of Technology)
Medical Center Project

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2012 summer studio_Medical Center Design

  1. 1. Yoon + Jun Design WorksA R C H I T E C T U R E S T U D I O 7 Works : The New Patient Care Tower | 2012 Summer Studio by Jongyoun Jung, Euijun Jeong P R O F E S S O R : B E N J A M I N R I L E Y
  2. 2. 01.1 INTRODUCTIONCOURSE OVERVIEWPROJECT DESCRIPTION PEDAGOGICAL STATEMENT“Advocate Christ Medical Center, located in Oak Lawn, is a recognized leader in the medical community and Partum units; mechanical floor(s); and a bridge or Neighborhoods function as nodes in the larger net-one of the major tertiary and quaternary referral hospitals in the Midwest. This premier teaching institutiontower connection to a new parking structure across work of the village and city. Without top-down masterexcels in a variety of specialties including neurosciences, oncology, pediatrics and women’s health. One of Kostner Street. Conceptual design work used to in- planning, neighborhoods can be an inefficient piecethe largest and most comprehensive providers of cardiovascular services in Illinois, it’s nationally renownedform the comprehensive design work to include: of their ecosystem and allowed to under-serve thefor its advanced procedures in the treatment of heart disease, heart connecting to the existing hospital main entry/lobby whole. Presently, the inter-relationships of the neigh-failure and stroke. Christ Medical Center shares its campus with Advocate Hope Children’s Hospital—the (possible winter garden); the new parking structure borhoods are a symbiosis that allows competition andonly freestanding children’s hospital in Chicago’s south and southwest suburbs.” across Kostner Street (possible green wall); and a exploitation. The political, social, and economic fac- new link connection to the future second floor NICU tors that divide a village or city into parts are reflectedThe new Patient Care Tower will add approximately 308,000 BGSF to the Advocate Christ Medical Center in the South Patient Tower. The new Patient Care inside their individual neighborhoods. Political and(ACMC) campus. The building will most likely comprise seven inpatient floors. There will be a total of 183 Tower will be located in close proximity to the existing commercial factors divide neighborhoods into lots.private patient rooms in the new tower. For this studio, only the following programmed spaces will be the East/West and South Patient Towers and will need to Private ownership of the lots habitually ensures thatresponsibility of the student to design comprehensively: the labor delivery / recovery suite and 28 bed Post address several issues around connectivity as well distinct parcels will passively contribute to a neigh- as circulation of patients, materials and staff. borhood’s ecosystem. Evidence-based design and biophilic design prin- The idea of a neighborhood acting as a network im- ciples will be used to guide the experiential design plies consensual function, which implies co-owner- process. This studio will rely heavily on handmade ship. Sharing natural resources, such as rainfall, day- physical models as a tool for understanding the expe- light, and wind, requires the same top-down planning riential quality of the patient rooms and patient tower. that could guarantee neighborhoods actively ben- Students will be expected to read and discuss vari- efiting a city’s “biome”. Unlike the gorilla-style com- ous articles and book excerpts relating to the studio mandeering of vacant land in a city to force mutual- design process. Each student is responsible for the ism in an area of disinvestment, in a campus setting, programmatic and comprehensive building design individual ownership can self-propagate mutualistic on site 1 below (limited to public functions, i.e., lobby and commensal relationships between lots of diverse and its support functions, maternity services, building function - even between discrete parcels of land. cores and shell, and mechanical and electrical ser- Lots within a neighborhood can become nodes within vices). a network. This possibility usually remains outside site 1: 300,000+ sf patient tower: 183 private rooms the control of the architect unless they are working (healing garden) with communally owned properties or individually owned campuses. If prominent, lots in a neighbor- site 2: 331,000 sf + 1,046 space employee parking hood that are brought together to be nodes linked structure (green wall) by ties, though invisible, will promulgate an urban network paradigm. Accelerating this pattern shift re- site 3: 138,000 sf ground level connector quires recognition. Recognition is commensurate to (winter garden) the organism and its organization. YOON + JUN Design Works : Jongyoun Jung, Euijun Jeong | PROFESSOR : BENJAMINE RILEY 2
  3. 3. CONCEPT DESCRIPTION In Evidence Based on Design, there are many ways to design medical center for not only the patients, but also the staff, such as making a home-like environ- ment, ease of way finding, getting even natural light into the building, and biophilic design. In my design, in order to accomplish E.B.D, the main concept of the new patient building focuses on com- munication with users, communication with its neigh- borhood, and communication with nature. This “healing way”, uses the outdoor greenery spac- es that are surrounding the building to attract natural light into several small atriums of the building, and articulates a dynamic building shape. The atriums become a “sign” to help people easily find their way. Each floor is connected to green spaces either hor- izontally or vertically within tow or three story high gardens. This means that each patient room can have equally good view and intimacy with the nature, even though they do not have the same orientation. Also, the bridge between the parking garage and the new patient building becomes a promenade for pa- tients, staff, and the neighborhood. In addition, the Advocate Christ Medical Campus sur- rounding the parking lots would use as a place for wildlife through the biophilic design. The healing way starts from new park in front of the parking garage, and would be continuous along the west side of the parking garage and its roof garden, and finally con- nects with the winter garden. Lastly, the “healing way” including the arcade and several atriums would be the center of the whole Ad- vocate Christ Medical Campus.2012 SUMMER STUDIO | THE NEW PATIET CARE TOWER D E S I G N @ T h e A d v o c a t e C h r i s t M e d i c a l C e n ter (ACMC) Campus 3
  4. 4. 02.1 SITE ANALYSISSITE ANALYSIS 5 7 KOSTNER AVE.pic 1. South Side Kostner Ave. -Few Vegetation pic 5. North Side Kostner Ave. -Few Vegetation 6 SITE 2 3 4 95th STREET 1 95th STREET 95th STREETpic 2. Huge Parking Lots pic 6. Huge Parking Lotspic 3. East Side of the Site with Existing Campus pic 4. South Side view from the Existing Building pic 7. North side of the Site YOON + JUN Design Works : Jongyoun Jung, Euijun Jeong | PROFESSOR : BENJAMINE RILEY4
  5. 5. SITE ANALYSIS PROBLEM SEEKING & SOLVING Oak Lawn is a village in Cook County, Illinois, United States. The population was 55,245 at the 2000 cen- sus. Oak Lawn is a suburb of the city of Chicago, lo- cated southwest of the city. It shares borders with the city in two areas, but is surrounded mostly by other suburbs Oak Lawn is known for its community hospital, which serves the residents of Chicago and its suburbs. Christ Community Hospital (now known as Advo- cate Christ Medical Center) was built in Oak Lawn in 1960 and has expanded with the development of Hope Children’s Hospital, along with becoming a part of Advocate Health Care. Christ Hospital also has a state-of-the-art Level 1 trauma center, providing trau- ma patients with advanced emergency medical care. The emergency department treats more patients than any other hospital in Illinois. Now, the medical campus is surrounded by huge parking lots. Also, there are a few vegetations around the site. Thus, it is difficult to get nice view from pa- tient tower. Also, making a public space that has close connection with nature is very difficult. We have two strategies to solve current site prob- lems. Firstly, we make heavy vegetation on the park- ing garage. By that, entire campus can get a visual advantage from vertical vegetation. Also, we make vegetation path (it called healing way) that surround patient tower, will make good spaces that connected with nature. SEEN & UNSEEN CONNECTION There are some design factors that will make con- nection with existing buildings and community. First- ly, urban farm on the top of parking garage will give visual advantage for patient tower. Also, patients can get fresh vegetables from urban farm. It can provide job opportunity for community too. 2012 SUMMER STUDIO | THE NEW PATIET CARE TOWER D E S I G N @ The Advocate Christ Medical Center (ACMC) Campus
  6. 6. 03.1 PATIENT ROOM DESIGNPATIENT ROOM DESIGN PATIENT AREA FAMILY AREA NURSING AREA Figure 1. Concept SketchCONCEPTUAL DESIGN The reason why we tilt the shape of patient roomis to control visual direction to the parking garage. Figure 2. Floor PlanAlso, the shape gives feeling of the space deeperthat makes spatial quality higher. Dark wood flooringmakes cleaners detect dust on the floor easier so thatthe patient room can keep clean. Bright color woodfor furniture is helpful to make the atmosphere of theroom likes home, so patients feel the hospital famil-iar. Some parts of wall are painted with healing colorthat gives psychological help for patients.EVIDENCE BASED ON DESIGN Figure 3. Patient Wall Evidence-Based Design in healthcare is an exten-sion of the theories of evidence-based practice andevidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicinestems from Professor Archie L. Cochrane’s premisethat much “evidence” for best practices for medicaltreatments and interventions is available in the formof relevant randomized controlled trials. He stronglyadvocated that this evidence should be collected, an-alyzed, validated and then widely disseminated. Figure 4. East Side and South Side Wall YOON + JUN Design Works : Jongyoun Jung, Euijun Jeong | PROFESSOR : BENJAMINE RILEY 6
  7. 7. 2. Material Flooring Brazilian - Easy to see the dust on the Cherry floor - Makes rich space Tree Furniture Birch - Contrast with floor Natural - Makes bright space - Makes soft atmosphere Tree Wall Paper Back - Using Healing Colors Painted depends on program Glass 3. Meaning of Healing Colors Ante-L.D.R Larger size of window let Soothes - Relaxes mentally, as well as physically YG more daylight into the room - Helps alleviate depression, nervousess, that reduces depression of and anxiety - Offers a sense of renewal, self-control, patients. Vertical vegetation and harmony on the parking garage gives B UE L distant view of nature. Also, Labor Delivery Room healing way gives closer con- - Calms and Sedates nection with nature. Both of - Cools - Aids intuition factors can reduce pain and stress of patient. Home-like furniture, such as bed and sofa, makes patient room more familiar that improves patients’ sleep. Also, dark color floor diminish hospital Y LO EL Postpartum Room - Stimulates mental process - Activates memory - Encourages communication PATIENT ROOM DOOR PERSPECTIVE VIEW acquired infections.2012 SUMMER STUDIO | THE NEW PATIET CARE TOWER D E S I G N @ T h e A d v o c a t e C h r i s t M e d i c a l C e n ter (ACMC) Campus 7
  8. 8. 03.2 DAYLIGHT STUDY Figure1. Door Perspective | AM 9:00 Figure5. Pillow Perspective | AM 9:00 Figure2. AM 10:00 Figure3. PM 1:00 Figure4. PM 5:00 Figure6. AM 10:00 Figure7. PM 1:00 Figure8. PM 5:00 YOON + JUN Design Works : Jongyoun Jung, Euijun Jeong | PROFESSOR : BENJAMINE RILEY8
  9. 9. EBD DEGIGN FACTORS FOR PATIENT ROOM 1. Reducing Pain - provide well designed outdoor gardens 2. Reducing Patient Stress - provide nature views provide visual art to enable patients to experience simulated nature 3. Improving Patients’ Sleep - Providing Home like furniture and atmosphere 4. Reducing Depression - linking higher daylight or sun exposure by providing larger windows 5. Reducing Hospital Acquired Infections - clean floor, furniture covering PATIENT PILLOW PERSPECTIVE VIEW2012 SUMMER STUDIO | THE NEW PATIET CARE TOWER D E S I G N @ T h e A d v o c a t e C h r i s t M e d i c a l C e n ter (ACMC) Campus 9
  10. 10. 04.1 BUILDING DESIGNCONCEPT GENERATION Figure 1. Concept Sketch SITE ? ? ! ? ? :( ? ! YOON + JUN Design Works : Jongyoun Jung, Euijun Jeong | PROFESSOR : BENJAMINE RILEY10
  11. 11. SOUTH KOSTNER AVE. PERSPECTIVE VIEW2012 SUMMER STUDIO | T H E N E W 0 P A T S E T C A R ES T U D I E R |D E S I E N E @ T h e A dE T c a A RC h r i s t W e d i c a l EC e n t e r (@ Ch eCA d va m a t e C h r i s t M e d i c a l C e n ter (ACMC) Campus 2 12 IUMME OWO TH G W P A T I vo C te E T O M E R D S I G N A T M ) C oc pus 11
  12. 12. 04.2 BUILDING DESIGNDESGIN DEVELOPMENTEvidence Based on Design Factors1. Reducing Hospital-Acquired Infections2. Reducing Medical Errors3. Reducing Pain4. Reducing Depression5. Reducing Spatial Disorientation6. Fostering Social Support7. Decreasing Staff Stress8. Increasing Staff Effectiveness ADJACENCY DIAGRAMConceptual Section DesignThis section study drawing shows the concept of asunken garden and daylight studies. The sunken gar-den, which has step benches and oak trees, givesa large exterior green park for patients, staff, andpublic. Additionally, the sunken garden gives moreintimate connection between the new tower and theexisting buildings. A pond in the sunken garden thatcombined with dining space can acts as a light re-flector which makes the underground dining spacebright. Also, the atrium as 9 stories height on northside is another factor that lets light and nature intothe building. CONCEPTUAL SECTION SKETCH C - SECTION STAFF ZONE LOADING STAFF ZONE AREA STAFF ENTRY TRIAGE HEALING connection with N GARDEN TRIAGE DEPARTING ICU AREA ANTE - L . D. R CHURCH SUNKEN VIEWINGROOM ATRIUM (2F - 3F) GARDEN LOBBY BRIDGE connection with Parking garage LIBRARY ATRIUM (1F - 2F) CAFE PUBLIC ZONE SUNKEN RETAIL SHOP GARDEN IN & OUT CIRCULATION Grid System & Only one core...? Two core...!! Shear Wall system 1st FLOOR 2nd FLOOR YOON + JUN Design Works : Jongyoun Jung, Euijun Jeong | PROFESSOR : BENJAMINE RILEY12
  13. 13. LOADING LOT N N SERVICE SOUTH ELEVATION ELEV ARCADE FROM STAFF, PATIENT EXISTING BUILDINGS EXISTING BLDG. ELEV. PRIVATE LOBBY ENTRY FOR PATIENT AND STAFF STAFF, PATIENT ELEV. LOBBY MAIN ENTRY PUBLIC ELEV EAST ELEVATION BRIDGE FROM PARKING GA- RAGE @2nd FLOOR SUNKEN GARDENINDEX PARKING GARAGE PUBLIC AREA SITE PLAN NURSING AREA NORTH ELEVATION PATIENT AREA POSTPARTUM POSTPARTUM POSTPARTUM POSTPARTUM POSTPARTUM POSTPARTUM ROOM ROOM ROOM ROOM ROOM ROOM with own Healing garden with own Healing gardenwith own Healing garden with own Healing garden with own Healing garden with own Healing garden NURSING NURSING NURSING NURSING NURSING NURSING AREA AREA I. C. U FLOORS (7 f ~ 9 f ) AREA AREA AREA AREA Each Floor has 36 of I.C.U HEALING HEALING HEALING GARDEN POSTPARTUM HEALING GARDEN POSTPARTUM GARDEN POSTPARTUM ROOM WAY ROOM ROOM with own Healing garden with own Healing garden with own Healing garden STAFF ZONE STAFF ZONE STAFF ZONE PUBLIC MECHANICAL PUBLIC PUBLIC ZONE ROOM (6F & 10F) ZONE ZONE PUBLIC PUBLIC PUBLIC ZONE HEALING ZONE ZONE GARDEN POSTPARTUM POSTPARTUM POSTPARTUM NURSING ROOM NURSING ROOM NURSING ROOM AREA with own Healing garden with own Healing garden with own Healing garden AREA AREA 3rd FLOOR 4th FLOOR 5th FLOOR 6th - 10th FLOORS WEST ELEVATION 2012 SUMMER STUDIO | THE NEW PATIET CARE TOWER D E S I G N @ The Advocate Christ Medical Center (ACMC) Campus
  14. 14. 04.2 BUILDING DESIGNDESIGN DEVELOPMENT1st FLOOR 2nd FLOOR 3rd FLOOR N BRIDGE N MAIN COURT FROM NICU ENTRY YARD @EXISTING BLDG. SERVICE AREA SERVICE AREA SECURITY SERVICE TRIAGE ENTRY LOBBY C-SECTION LOBBY COURT STAFF SOUTH CORE NORTH CORE STAFF SOUTH CORE NURSE NORTH CORE HEALING STAFF NURSE GARDEN PUBLIC YARD ZONE ZONE STATION STATION AREA #1 ZONE #2 SECURITY SOUTH CORE NORTH CORE COURT COURT YARD PUBLIC AREA YARD LIBRARY SECURITY PUBLIC AREA ANTEPARTUM ENTRY L.D.R L.D.R FOR ONLY SECURITY FLOWER SHOP CAFE CHURCH HEALING DEPARTING PATIENT GARDEN AREA &STAFF HEALING GARDEN HEALING WAY HEALING WAY (feet) BRIDGE N 0 10 30 60 FROM PARKING (feet) 0 10 30 60 (feet) 0 10 30 60 GARAGEThrough the south core adjacent to the main entry, a patient who has reservation with There are c-section and anti-partum on the second floor. Second floor is connected Third floor is for LDR. Staff area for LDR is located on the center of the floor thatc-section would be able to go to there directly. The other patient can go to the triage with both existing building (NICU) and parking garage. Since c-section is located on makes staff work more efficient. Also, decentralized nurse station Improve the qual-for the exam. west side, it is directly connected to NICU. Also, in emergency, movement between ity and safety of healthcare. Every patient room is arranged in same direction that c-section and anti-partum is easy. reduces medication errors. Surrounding healing way is combined with not only patient area, but also staff area. Thus it makes high quality nature-integrated space for pa- tient, family and staffs. (feet) (feet) 0 10 30 60 0 10 30 60 SOUTH ELEVATION EAST ELEVATION YOON + JUN Design Works : Jongyoun Jung, Euijun Jeong | PROFESSOR : BENJAMINE RILEY14
  15. 15. 4th, 5th FLOOR N POSTPARTUM ROOM LOBBY STAFF ZONE SOUTH CORE NORTH CORE NURSE NURSE NURSE STA- STATION STATION #4 TION #5 NURSE STATION #1 #2, 3 NURSERY NURSERY NURSERY POSTPARTUM ROOM POSTPARTUM ROOM (feet) 0 10 30 60 There are 24 post-partum rooms on the fourth floor. Even though some patient rooms faced east and west side, it can get advantage from healing way. Staff areas for post- partum are located on the center of the floor that makes staff work more efficient. Also, decentralized nurse station Improve the quality and safety of healthcare. WALL SECTIO DETAIL ELEVATION DETAIL Mech. Floor ICU (36) ICU (36) Mech. Floor ICU (36)Cardiac Telemetry (36) Parking lotCardiac Telemetry (36) Mech. Floor WALL Parking lot Trauma (12)Resp.(24) Postpartum (24) SECTION Parking lot Orthopedics (23) Postpartum (24) Parking lot Mental Health (23) Parking lot Med. Surg(37) L.D.R (13) Parking lot Woman’s Surgery (38) Future NICU (64) Ante-L.D.R (8) Parking lot Lobby / Clinics) Public,Church Parking lot Retail, Library Parking lot Pharmacy /Lockers Lab / Kitchen 0 10 30 60 (feet) 0 10 30 60 TRANSVERSAL SECTION LONGITUDINAL SECTION 2012 SUMMER STUDIO | THE NEW PATIET CARE TOWER D E S I G N @ T h e A d v o c a t e C h r i s t M e d i c a l C e n ter (ACMC) Campus 15
  16. 16. 04.2 BUILDING DESIGNINTERIOR DESIGNEBD DEGIGN FACTORS FOR PATIENT ROOM1. Reducing Pain - provide well designed outdoor gardens2. Reducing Patient Stress - provide nature views provide visual art to enable patients to experience simulated nature3. Improving Patients’ Sleep - Providing Home like furniture and atmosphere4. Reducing Depression - linking higher daylight or sun exposure by providing larger windows5. Reducing Hospital Acquired Infections - clean floor, furniture coveringMAIN LOBBY DESIGN Two main lobbies on the first floor are designed by bio-philic design theory. Two story high large windows let alot of day light into the space. Elevator core is coveredwith marble stone and artificial waterfall in front of thecore activates the lobby space. Furthermore, mimicrytree that covers column structure reduce distinction be-tween exterior and interior space. SOUTH SIDE MAIN LOBBY YOON + JUN Design Works : Jongyoun Jung, Euijun Jeong | PROFESSOR : BENJAMINE RILEY16
  17. 17. BIOPHILIC CONCEPT SKETCH NORTH SIDE LOBBY ONLY FOR PATIENT & STAFF BIOPHILIC DESIGN DETAIL2012 SUMMER STUDIO | THE NEW PATIET CARE TOWER D E S I G N @ T h e A d v o c a t e C h r i s t M e d i c a l C e n ter (ACMC) Campus 17
  18. 18. 04.2 BUILDING DESIGN HEALING GARDEN BIRD’S EYE VIEW YOON + JUN Design Works : Jongyoun Jung, Euijun Jeong | PROFESSOR : BENJAMINE RILEY18
  19. 19. PHYSICAL MODEL NORTH KOSTNER AVE. PERSPECTIVE VIEW2012 SUMMER STUDIO | THE NEW PATIET CARE TOWER D E S I G N @ T h e A d v o c a t e C h r i s t M e d i c a l C e n ter (ACMC) Campus 19
  20. 20. 05.1 4. MECH.ELEC.SYSTEM CHECK INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE 4.1 Possible Heating and Cooling System a. Variable Air Volume (VAV)1. OCCUPANCY b. VAV Reheat Institutional occupancies include facilities where occupants cannot fully care for them- c. Dual-Duct VAV selves, including residential care, day care, assisted living, health care, and correctional d. CAV Reheat facilities. e. Multizone This group includes 24-hour medical, psychiatric, and custodial care facilities with 6 or more f. Air-Water Induction (Infrequently Used) occupants, in which occupants are not capable of self-preservation in an emergency. g. Fan-Coil Terminals Afacility such as this with 5 or fewer occupants may be classified as Group R-3 Residential. 4.2 Major Equipment Spaces for Large Building Group I-2 also includes 24-hour care for 6 or more infants 2 1/2 years of age of less. a. Typical Sizes of Transformer Vaults: 20’ x 40’ x 11’ b. Typical Sizes of Switchgear Rooms: 30’ x 40’ x 11’2. STRUCTURE c. Space Requirements for Water Pumps - Domestic Water Pumps 16’ x 12’ (200,000 to 1,000,000 sqft) 2.1 Liveload - Fire Pumps (Assuming sprinklers): 30’ x 24’ (200,000 to 1,000,000 sqft) a. Private room: 40psf - 60psf d. Vertical Distribution of Services b. Operating room: 60psf - 90psf - Total Shaft Area : c. Lobbies: 60psf - 100psf The total open area of all the mechanical and electrical shafts in a tall office d. Outdoor Areas: Pedestrian 100psf - 150psf building is normally equal to about 4 % of the area served on each floor, and Vehicular 150psf - 250psf can be estimated at about half this amount for a low-rise building. This should be e. Roof Loads: 80psf - 150psf divided into at least two separate shafts to relieve the congestion that would oth- f. Storage: Light 125psf - 150psf erwise occur where the vertical and horizontal distribution networks connect. For Heavy 150psf - 250psf maximum utility, the horizontal proportions of each shaft should lie in the range of 2.2 Possible structural system 1:2 to 1:4. a. Masonry - Electrical And Telecommunications Closets : - Brick Masonry Columns and Walls (Shear Wall System) . Major Electrical Closet: 7’-0” x 11’-6” - Concrete Masony Columns and Walls (Shear Wall System) . Small or Satellite Electrical Closet: 5’-0” x 2’-6” b. Steel - Plumbing Walls (Janitor Closets, and Toilet Rooms): - Beams and Girders . Plumbing Wall : 12” for fixtures on one side - Open-Web Joists : 16” for Fixtures on two sides - Trusses . Minimum Janitor Closet: 8’-0” x 4’-6” c. Sitecast Concrete e. Minimum Toilet Fixture Requirements - Beams and Girders (Conventional Steel Frame) - Institutional Occupancies, employee and visitor toilet facilities must be separate - One-Way Solid Slab (Semi-Rigid Joints with Supplemental Braced Frame or Shear Wall) from resident facilities. - Two-Way Flat Slab (Semi-Rigid Joints with Supplemental Braced Frame or Shear Wall) - Medical and Custodial Care (Residents only) d. Precast Concrete (1) Water Closet: 1 per room - Beams and Girders (Recommend Shear Wall) (2) Lavatories: 1 per room - Solid and Hollow Core Slab (Recommend Shear Wall) (3) Drinking Fountains: 1 per 100 (4) Bathrooms/showers: 1 per 15 (5) Number of Occupants of Each Sex: Any number (6) Number of Water Clostes for Each Sex: Male: 1 per 30/ Female: 1 per 25 (7) Number of Lavatories: At least 1, and not less than 1 per every 2 water closets f. Elevator Dimensions - Capacity 6000 lb - Inside Car Dimensions 5’-9” x 10’-0” - Inside Shaft Dimensions ( W x D ) 8’-2” x 11’-9” YOON + JUN Design Works : Jongyoun Jung, Euijun Jeong | PROFESSOR : BENJAMINE RILEY20
  21. 21. 5. EGRESS SYSTEM AND ACCESSIBILITY 5.1 Exit Access Paths Group I-2 Institutional Medical and Custodial Care Occupancies have special exit ac- cess requirements reflecting the needs of occupants who in many cases may be inca- pable of moving themselves to safety in the event of a building fire. See the code for details. For emergency escape and rescue requirements for residential occupancies. Egress Through Adjacent spaces :In their most conventional configuration, exit access pathways are ex- pected to proceed from rooms to corridors and then to exit. The International Building Code in most ci- cumstances also permits exit access pathways to flow through intermediate spaces to whichthe originating space is functionally related. Howev er, once an exit access path reaches a corridor, it must proceed directly to an exit stair or other exit component and cannot reenter other spaces. 5.3 Egress Components Widths (Should be sprinklered) 5.2 Corridors a. Doorways, Corridors, Ramps, and Other Components: 0.2” a. Unrated corridor enclosures are permitted in Group I-2 occupancies b. Stairs: 0.3” b. Exterior corridors c. Chart from p.287 (based on our area; 300,000 sqft - 1,250/4 exits = 312.5) Exit access ways may include open balconies on the exterior of a building. When - Clear Width of Corridor and Stair : Corridor 70” and Stair 92” leading to only one exit stair, such balconies must be separated from interior - Number of 3’-0” doors : 3 spaces by fire resistive walls and protected door and window openings. In the - Number of 3’-4” doors : 3 IBC, these walls and openings must have fire-resistance ratings equal to those re- - Number of 4’-0” doors : 3 quired for a corridor. Where Balconies provide two independent means of egress, - Number of pairs of 3’-0” doors without center mullion : 2 adjacent walls and openings are not required to be fire rated in either code. d. Stairway Though not a code requirement, consideration should also be given to deigning - Max. Riser Height: 7” exterior balconies to prevent the accumulation of ice and snow in cold climates. - Min. Riser Height: 4” c. The Exit - Min. Tread Run: 11” - Number of the Exit: More than 1000 occupants must have at least four. - Max. Vertical Distance between Landings: 12’ (1) Institutional Occupancies, inpatient treatment areas: e. Ramp 240sqft gross, 300,000 / 240 = 1,250 (1,250/4 = 312.5) - Max. Ramp Slope (2) Institutional Occupancies, outpatient treatment areas: 1:12 for ramps part of means of egress or on accessible routes 100sqft gross, 300,000 / 100 = 3,000 1:8 for other ramps - Direct Exit - Min. Ramp Width: 36” clear width between sides of ramp, or handrails if any - Exit Stairways - Max. Distance Between Landings: 30” rise - Smokeproof Enclosures - Exit Passageways 6. PARKING - The Exit Discharge 6.1 Parking Capacity d. Accessible Routes a. (Recommended Parking Ratios for Preliminary Design: 1000 gross sqft) e. Egress System b. The sum of: - Mximum Travel Distance (with Sprinklered): 200’ 0.1 - 0.75 per staff, plus - Mximum Common Path of Egress Travel: 75’ 0.3 - 0.75 per bed, plus - Largest Room or Area That May Have Only One Means of Egress: 0.2 per daily outpatient 1000sqft for Sleeping rooms or Suites; 2500sqft other areas Or: 4 - 10 per 1000 gross sqft - Minimum Length of Dead-End Corridor: 20’ - Door Width: Min: 32” net clear; 41.5” where beds must be moved 6.2 Parking Level Of Service (LOS) - Minimum Clear Corridor Width: LOS A - LOS B 44” serving more than 49 occupants, and 96”where beds must be moved 6.3 Dimension of Parking lot - Minimum Stair Width: a. Ramp in Parking lot: greater than 1:20 (5%) 44” serving more than 49 occupants, 36” serving 49 or fewer b. Accessible car spaces: Width 96” - Additional Requirements: Each floor must be subdivided by at least one smoke- c. Accessible van spaces: Width 132” proof wall with horizontal exits. d. Minimum Vertical Clearance: 98” 2012 SUMMER STUDIO | THE NEW PATIET CARE TOWER D E S I G N @ T h e A d v o c a t e C h r i s t M e d i c a l C e n ter (ACMC) Campus 21

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