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The Innovation Matrix - and the leadership approaches

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The Innovation Matrix characterizes four areas of innovation, and innovation activities, each with a different leadership approach and style. The model was initially proposed by Maz Spork and Søren Skov, and further extended here for the leadership angles.

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The Innovation Matrix - and the leadership approaches

  1. 1. The Innovation Matrix Innovation as Usual 24-Oct-2017 Puk Falkenberg, Advisor, Bloch&Østergaard Erik Korsvik Østergaard, Partner, Bloch&Østergaard Creating organizations, where people want to show up!
  2. 2. Introduction • The Innovation Matrix characterises four areas of innovation, and innovation activities, each with a different leadership approach and style. • The model was initially proposed by Maz Spork and Søren Skov, and further extended here for the leadership angles. • The Innovation Matrix is featured in the book ‘The Responsive Leader’ by Erik Korsvik Østergaard. In sale February 2018 2
  3. 3. The Mindset of Developing the Business 3 Business as usual Business development Innovation Pivoting Run the business Grow the business Transform the business Innovation resides in the middle of a continuum of activities, spanning from business as usual to radical pivoting of the business (The terms run/grow/transform the business is coined by Gartner):
  4. 4. The Two-Dimensional Spectrum of innovation 4 Mundane improvements Radical change Everyday maintenance Strategic pivots The model was initially proposed by Maz Spork and Søren Skov, and further extended here for the leadership angles.
  5. 5. Combined you have 5 The Innovation Matrix
  6. 6. The Innovation Matrix 6 The model was initially proposed by Maz Spork and Søren Skov, and further extended here for the leadership angles.
  7. 7. The Innovation Matrix 7 • Spend most time ”running the business”. • Minimum of innovation activities and maximum of everyday tasks, focusing on improving the everyday business • This is where activities like Lean live and thrive If you’re not already doing this; that is, if you’re not even performing everyday improvements, you’ll be out of business very soon! The model was initially proposed by Maz Spork and Søren Skov, and further extended here for the leadership angles.
  8. 8. The Innovation Matrix 8 • Encourage your team to exploit new opportunities as a part of “growing your business”. • Developing and changing the way you organize tasks and teams. • Moving your focus from maintain to evolve requires a leadership shift, where you release control and empower the employees, and facilitate the innovation process. Your distributed leadership is key here! The model was initially proposed by Maz Spork and Søren Skov, and further extended here for the leadership angles.
  9. 9. The Innovation Matrix 9 • Strategic improvements and innovative ideas are investigated, tested, validated and evaluated as a part of “growing the business”. • Going fast and slow at the same time with an agile leadership style, and inviting and involving key influencers in the idea-generation and strategic innovation process. Try, inspect, and adapt. Fail fast, fail forward, so we can learn and evaluate, and apply or throw away. The model was initially proposed by Maz Spork and Søren Skov, and further extended here for the leadership angles.
  10. 10. The Innovation Matrix 10 • “Transforming the business” is where the really innovative – maybe even disruptive – ideas are explored and exploited, and this is where the business jumps to new patterns, markets, ways of working, and identity and image. • “Let’s test this, and test this fast” philosophy comes naturally with a “can-do” attitude and a “break-away” mindset. • The responsive leader thrives here! The re-merge from innovation and development back into operation must be done fast, hence the omni-present demand of change willingness. The model was initially proposed by Maz Spork and Søren Skov, and further extended here for the leadership angles.
  11. 11. Bloch&Østergaard • Creating organizations, where people want to show up! 11

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