Get Started with a Great
WordPress Class Site

© 2014 Erik Bean, Ed.D. & Emily Waszak
More Info? CommonCoreLessonPlans.com
Available from These
Book Sellers:

© 2014 Erik Bean, Ed.D. & Emily Waszak
More Info? CommonCoreLessonPlans.com
WordPress for Student Writing Projects
Your students are adept in using social
media for pleasure. Here’s a way to
harness...
Using Social Media Lessons
 Some faculty are reluctant to use social media in the classroom either because

their distric...
WordPress for Student Writing Projects
Connect with the authors via several
social networking sites:

Designed to Accompan...
BlogFellows.WordPress.com
Model Essay Draft Collaboration Site

Designed to Accompany the New 2014 Book: WordPress for Stu...
WordPress Dashboard Backend
1). First create the
main alphabetical
parent landing
pages A-C by adding
a new page and
label...
Creating Parent & Subordinate Pages
4). Take your roster of
all available A-C first
names and add them to
the page content...
Add Widgets to Suit Your Class

Widgets are found under “Appearance.” Customize these to report which student
commented la...
Quality Cohort Discussion: Hero Essay
1.

Did the student select a contemporary hero for which much published
material exi...
Contributing to Comments
•

Encourage
quality
commenting by
visibly posting
your own
remarks.

•

Encourage
students to pi...
Draft Evaluations/Assessments

Sample of Common Core tied rubric that can be used to evaluate the essay draft.
Another rub...
Draft Evaluations/Assessments

Rubrics can be sent back to students electronically, posted to the student’s
electronic gra...
Questions?

Designed to Accompany the New 2014 Book: WordPress for Student Writing Projects
Published by Brigantine Media/...
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Getting Started with a WordPress Class Lesson Blog

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WordPress Page Navigation Build Tips for Essay Draft Collaboration. Designed to accompany the new 2014 book: WordPress for Student Writing Projects, published by Brigantine Media/Compass Publishing, St. Johnsbury, VT
Your students are adept in using social media for pleasure. Here’s a way to harness those skills for learning! Get started with a great WordPress class site set up.

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Getting Started with a WordPress Class Lesson Blog

  1. 1. Get Started with a Great WordPress Class Site © 2014 Erik Bean, Ed.D. & Emily Waszak More Info? CommonCoreLessonPlans.com
  2. 2. Available from These Book Sellers: © 2014 Erik Bean, Ed.D. & Emily Waszak More Info? CommonCoreLessonPlans.com
  3. 3. WordPress for Student Writing Projects Your students are adept in using social media for pleasure. Here’s a way to harness those skills for learning! Why this book is unique: • Includes lessons in argumentative essay writing, thesis generation, and quality sources. Author Erik Bean, Ed.D. • Contains rubrics tied to Common Core writing strand numbers. (Big time saver). • Appendix of "Operationalized" Common Core Writing Standard explanations so requirements are easier to follow. (Another time saver). • Rubrics can be used to grade most any writing lessons regardless of the standard. • Writing lessons can be transferable to most any blog sites. Designed to Accompany the New 2014 Book: WordPress for Student Writing Projects Published by Brigantine Media/Compass Publishing, St. Johnsbury, VT
  4. 4. Using Social Media Lessons  Some faculty are reluctant to use social media in the classroom either because their district may not allow it or they do not understand how to best incorporate it. This lesson plan uses WordPress and features teacher tested steps to get your class channel up and running. While no social network is 100 percent safe, their use can help retain student attention, improve writing, and critical thinking skills. Feel free to share your experiences here.  Did you know most of what the CC Writing Standards require have already been in practice by districts? The key has been how to best capture and document the processes to demonstrate each student rigorously meets the guidelines. Regardless, the standards call for integrating technology into the classroom. This requirement is where some districts and faculty are uncertain how to proceed.  Compared to non-public platforms like Blackboard and Edmodo, teachers report higher lesson attentive levels since students knew their parents and others in the classroom could more readily view their work in and out of class.
  5. 5. WordPress for Student Writing Projects Connect with the authors via several social networking sites: Designed to Accompany the New 2014 Book: WordPress for Student Writing Projects Published by Brigantine Media/Compass Publishing, St. Johnsbury, VT
  6. 6. BlogFellows.WordPress.com Model Essay Draft Collaboration Site Designed to Accompany the New 2014 Book: WordPress for Student Writing Projects Published by Brigantine Media/Compass Publishing, St. Johnsbury, VT
  7. 7. WordPress Dashboard Backend 1). First create the main alphabetical parent landing pages A-C by adding a new page and labeling as such. 2). Then add new subordinate pages based on your roster by first name and last initial. Be sure to apply the appropriate parent under “Page Attributes” in the right column by using the dropdown menu. 3). Add an “About/Tips” page that will stand alone. Then repeat this process for all main parent alphabetical student landing pages, D-F, G-I, J-L, M-O, P-R, S-U, V-Z
  8. 8. Creating Parent & Subordinate Pages 4). Take your roster of all available A-C first names and add them to the page content in edit mode. 5). Highlight the top name then select the link icon to embed a hyperlink to that student’s respective page. 6). Now click “Or link to existing content.” Find the first student you earlier created a page and link to it. Be sure to check the box indicating “Open link in separate window/tab.” Finally, click “Update.” 7). Repeat this process for all main alphabetical landing parent and subordinate student pages through Z. ADDING ESSAY DRAFTS: As the site owner, only you will have access to adding the essay drafts. When you receive them electronically based on class due date, open each one on your desktop. Highlight all essay text and while in WordPress edit mode on the pertinent student’s page, paste text. Repeat for all students. Allow 30 minutes for a class of twenty.
  9. 9. Add Widgets to Suit Your Class Widgets are found under “Appearance.” Customize these to report which student commented last or most frequently. Use these to report which student page has the most traffic or to create a complete site map of every student page as shown at BlogFellows.WordPress.com. Widgets are shown on all pages except home. Designed to Accompany the New 2014 Book: WordPress for Student Writing Projects Published by Brigantine Media/Compass Publishing, St. Johnsbury, VT
  10. 10. Quality Cohort Discussion: Hero Essay 1. Did the student select a contemporary hero for which much published material exists? 2. Did the student effectively develop a thesis with two of the most prominent hero personality traits melding them to his or her most important societal contribution? 3. Did the student use an authoritative third person voice? 4. Did the student include and attribute the hero’s background 5. Did the student define and defend the hero’s personality traits? 6. Did the student defend the hero’s most important societal contribution? 7. Did the student effectively summarize the essay? Designed to Accompany the New 2014 Book: WordPress for Student Writing Projects Published by Brigantine Media/Compass Publishing, St. Johnsbury, VT
  11. 11. Contributing to Comments • Encourage quality commenting by visibly posting your own remarks. • Encourage students to pick at least two student essays as well as two peer feedback postings to analyze. If time permits, allow them to analyze more. Designed to Accompany the New 2014 Book: WordPress for Student Writing Projects Published by Brigantine Media/Compass Publishing, St. Johnsbury, VT
  12. 12. Draft Evaluations/Assessments Sample of Common Core tied rubric that can be used to evaluate the essay draft. Another rubric (not shown) also applied to Common Core Writing Standards, is used to evaluate rigorous peer essay analysis collaboration, peer feedback, and visibility. Designed to Accompany the New 2014 Book: WordPress for Student Writing Projects Published by Brigantine Media/Compass Publishing, St. Johnsbury, VT
  13. 13. Draft Evaluations/Assessments Rubrics can be sent back to students electronically, posted to the student’s electronic gradebook, or printed for individual distribution. Designed to Accompany the New 2014 Book: WordPress for Student Writing Projects Published by Brigantine Media/Compass Publishing, St. Johnsbury, VT
  14. 14. Questions? Designed to Accompany the New 2014 Book: WordPress for Student Writing Projects Published by Brigantine Media/Compass Publishing, St. Johnsbury, VT

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