Networked Society City Index 2013 City Profiles

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City profiles from the 2013 Networked Society City Index which features 31 major world cities and measures their ICT maturity as well as the economic, social and environmental dimensions, called the “triple bottom line” effects.

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Networked Society City Index 2013 City Profiles

  1. 1. NETWORKED SOCIETY CITY INDEX 2013 APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES
  2. 2. Contents Introduction 4 #1 Stockholm 5 #2 London 6 #3 Singapore 6 #4 Paris 7 #5 Copenhagen 8 #6 Oslo 9 #7 Hong Kong 10 #8 New York 11 #9 Helsinki 12 #10 Tokyo 13 #11 Los Angeles 15 #12 Miami 15 #13 Seoul 16 #14 Taipei 17 #15 Sydney 18 #16 Moscow 19 #17 São Paulo 20 #18 Istanbul 21 #19 Beijing 22 #20 Shanghai 23 #21 Buenos Aires 24 #22 Johannesburg 25 #23 Mexico City 26 #24 Manila 27 #25 Jakarta 28 #26 Delhi 29 #27 Cairo 30 #28 Mumbai 31 #29 Lagos 31 #30 Karachi 32 #31 Dhaka 33 Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES  3
  3. 3. introduction This study aims to provide insights into how cities could use ICT to improve their socioeconomic and environmental impact, and to inspire the development of networked cities worldwide. The Networked Society City Index 2013 draws on data from 31 cities around the world. The sample ranges from cities in developing economies in South Asia and Africa to developed cities in the USA and northern Europe. However, the list is not exclusive. The selection here is based on a list of the world’s largest cities, with additional cities with strong ICT development and/or interesting aspects. The Networked Society City Index 2013 is open to other cities and we hope that the list will continue to grow. The city profiles provide the reader with city-specific results in the six dimensions of the composite index, describing their current state in terms of ICT maturity and socioeconomic and environmental development. The city profiles are designed to generate interest in issues related to ICT maturity and triple bottom line (TBL) development on a local level. They do not provide the reader with answers, but point out interesting results from the index that could be transformed into policy-relevant discussions at both local and national levels. While the indicators of ICT maturity dimensions measure input to ICT development, the TBL indicators measure output of social, economic and environmental development in cities. The charts present the results of the city in each of the six dimensions of the index relative to other cities included in the study. The axis of the chart goes from zero to the top value in each dimension. TY ILI B DA SO CIA L R O FF INFRASTRUCTURE US L TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY A TA AG N ME ON E IR NV E The complexity in the relation between environmental development and increased ICT maturity is highlighted by the lighter color shading. ECONOMIC 4  Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES US AG E
  4. 4. INFRASTRUCTURE T EN NM EN O VIR INFRASTRUCTURE Stockholm INFRASTRUCTUR INF ICT MATURITY I INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY AL INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY MATURITY ICT US RDA FOAGE AF IAL NT E NM O VIR INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY Stockholm performs very well in the EN Stockholm three ICT dimensions, including ICT usage. Despite the highest scores in #1 individual and market use, a slightly US Stockholm AG lower performance in technology E usage (penetration rates in computers, mobile phones, smartphones NTAL US E AG US NM E and tablets) indicates that the Icity should continue to AG RO E NV E invest in ICT in order to maintain its leading position. NT Stockholm’s ambitious plan to ME ON IR provide fiber Eaccess to its homes and NV businesses makes it one of the most NT fiber dense cities globally FurtherME SORON ITY more, Stockholm Lhas a tradition of BIL VI CIA US A EN RD AG FO early and rapid rollout of mobile infraE AF structure dating back to the very first days of mobile TY SO ILI communication. IA recent example of this advanced CA AB L RD position in mobile communications technology is the FO AF launch of LTE in Stockholm in as early as 2009. In the index, Stockholm ranks #2 in the ICT infrastructure NT ME assessment afterNLondon, followed by Paris and O R Stockholm Singapore. ENVI INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC Stockholm ranks well above average Y LIT AB in the social dimensionI of the index. RD O A equally well both The city performsFF US in health and education as well as in AG E social inclusion. However, Stockholm is facing challenges regarding CI IAL The environmental dimension lowers ON VIR the overall result for Stockholm and ITY EN SO BIL C leaves room forIAimprovement despite DA L OR FF T A the overall high ranking. As in many #1 EN SO NM ITY CO developed cities, the DABIL standard of I VIR AL R EN living puts stress AFFO the environment on and induces climate change. Stockholm does gain #1 AL U NT Y S fact thatSAG large part of NME energyITcomes from from theOC aE its O BIL IAL DA VIR from the lack of hazardR non-fossil energy sources, and EN FO AF Y ous air pollution. SO LIT AL BI C ME TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE N IRO V EN ON SO NT ME E AL E TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE AG AG VIR ECONOMIC ECONOMIC US #1 OC TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE L B DA OR F NT AF ECONOMIC CIA The city also gets a high score in the V EN economic dimension. Stockholm ranks highest in economic competitiveness and is equally strong and US well above average in AGE business startups, employment in knowledgeintensive services as well as in tertiary educational U attainment. However, Stockholm is notSamong the top AG E five in GDP per capita.ITY S IL ECONOMIC ECONOMIC SO FO EN M LINEBOTTOM LINE PPLE ITY BIL N IRO E A NT ME AG ECONOMIC V EN US ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE Stockholm is the highest ranked city in the Networked Society City Index, having achieved a high score in all dimensions and variables of the index. Stockholm has a long, proven track record of focused initiatives and IT programs to driveYthe progress of ICT infrastructure. SO BIL CIA DA With the deregulation of the LSwedish telecom market in OR FF A the early 1990s, the city adopted an ambitious plan to provide fiber access to both homes and businesses. This year, the target of having every multi-tenant building connected#1 fiber was reached, making to Stockholm one of the most fiber dense cities globally. A third place in TBL performance leaves room for develAL opment, especially in the economic and environmental US NT AG ME N dimensions. E IRO T IR ECONOMIC The city accounts for about 30 percent of Sweden’s GDP . The last decade has seen a significant number of jobs created in high technology companies. Stockholm has a highly skilled workforce and strong research and development – and some of the world’s most advanced users of ICT. A major ICT center is located in Kista, in northern Stockholm. The number of ICT companies in the Stockholm region has grown dramatically in recent years. N ME E ECONOMIC The service industry, which accounts for roughly 85 percent of jobs in Stockholm, in combination with the almost total absence of heavy industry (and fossil fuel power plants) make Stockholm one of the world’s cleanest metropolises. US L TA EN M ON ECONOMIC The capital of Sweden offers an environment for life and business that scores high in most of the contextrelated dimensions. The Stockholm metropolitan area with 2.1 million inhabitants, home to 22 percent of Sweden’s population, is the most populous city in Sweden and on the Scandinavian Peninsula. Stockholm municipality has a population of 890,000. AF AG V social sustainability and could offer more equal life EN opportunities to all of its residents. L #1 Stockholm A RD #1 US The open city-owned fiber network SO Stockholm C allows individualIAusers to choose L their own network service provider. This competitive market with multiple suppliers provides the users with competitive prices and affordable connections to the digital world. TY ILI AB D OR F AF Stockholm #2 London London, the capital city of England and the UK, has an estimated 8.3 million residents (2012), accounting for Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES  5
  5. 5. CIA L INFRASTRUCTURE M ON VIR EN NT E NM O VIR EN ITY SO BIL A RD INFRASTRUCTURE E L TA EN AG E TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE AG #2 US ECONOMIC US CI VIR EN INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC AL there is room for improvement. SO F ITY AC BIL IAL London performs well Aabove average RD FO AF in the social dimension of the index in total, especially in health, where US #2 initiatives such as the London AGE Health Programmes and Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system to share patient information A across organizations have beenL implemented over the US NT ME last decade.AGE However, because London is a city with ON London VIR EN socio-economic inequalities, increasing availability of T N M health care in certain Egroups is an important issue. ON FO RASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC The city scores high in the economic dimension. London, the unchallenged SO ITY Cbusiness center of the UK, has BIL IAL Aa RD FO strong economy with a relatively high AF US AG GDP per capita. London also perE 6  Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES London NT ME N INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY AG AL NT E NM E ICT usage scores high for London on O VIR EN an individual and market level. The city also performs well in technology use, with high penetration rates in computers, mobile phones, smartLondon phones and tablets. US USA AGE GE London’s ICT infrastructure is exUS AG panded, especially in terms of E broadband quality, fixed and mobile T ENT N broadband and international internet M NME O RON VIR I bandwidth capacity, where London is ENV EN ranked as number one in the Networked Society City Index. London has a good availSO ITY NT TY SOC IL BILI ability of ICT, withANa Elarge amount of Wi-Fi hotspots in CI LM IA A DAB OL IR R ORD O the city, goodENV fiber penetration and internet Faccess. AFF AF INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE A ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY SO FF TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE TY ILI AB D OR A US ECONOMIC V EN The environmental dimension lowers TY theBoverall result for London, and has SO ILI CI DA room for furtherAL improvement. The OR #2 #2 FF A T city has an impact on climate and its N ME ON use of resources is relatively high. VIR EN L However, as with most developed TAL A US USA ENT N #2 AGE cities, London performs well regarding pollution, M NME GE ON IRO SO ITY demonstrating that actions toNVIR ENV E improve theILenvironment CI B AL DA are implemented in the city. OR FF ECONOMIC #2 London ranks second in the Networked Society City Index and it performs very well in all six dimensions of the index. Above all, London has a very well developed AL ICT infrastructure. It scores above average in all TBL US NT ME GE areas, apart Afrom the environmental dimension, where ON IR AFF AF ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE The metropolitan area generates approximately 30 percent of the UK’s GDP London is one of the world’s . leading financial centers: finance is its largest industry, and its financial exports make the city a large contributor to the UK’s balance of payments. London has over 480 overseas banks, more than any other city in the world. Over 85 percent of the employed population of Greater London work in services industries and more ITY than 100 of Europe’s 500 OC S largest companies have their BIL IAL DA headquarters in central London. A growing number of OR F AF technology companies are based in London, notably in East London Tech City. forms well in economic competitiveness and above average in business startups, employment in knowlUS edge-intensive servicesTY wellSO in tertiary educational as as I AG ILITY SOC ABIL B E CIAL IAL attainment. RDA D FOR O ECONOMIC ECONOMIC London is a leading global city, with strengths in the arts, commerce, entertainment, fashion, healthcare, media, tourism, and more. It is the world’s most-visited city. Its universities form the largest concentration of higher education in Europe. ECONOMIC 12.5 percent of the UK population. The London metropolitan area is the largest in the EU with a total population of 13.6 million. The ICT market in London has a large TY SO ILI CI AB AL number of worldwide network operaRD FO AF tors, and even though there is more data center space in London than in many other European cities, limited London London data space is still an issue. This reflects what seems to be a competitive market with multiple suppliers. According to the index, the ICT market in London offers competitive prices. London #3 Singapore Singapore, with its 5.3 million inhabitants, is a global financial, industrial and technological hub, and has emerged as a leader in the green ICT economy. Its success in ICT can be explained by a highly skilled workforce, business-friendly climate, great logistics and its central location. Singapore offers its inhabitants one of the highest living standards in Asia. In 2012, the city was the highest scoring Asian city in Mercer’s Quality of Living Survey. Moreover, Mercer rated Singapore as having the best infrastructure in the world. When it comes to sustainability, Singapore’s government has stressed the importance of green and clean cities. For example, Singapore was the first city to use
  6. 6. INFRASTRUCTURE L TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE AL ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY CI ECONOMIC of smartphones and tablets. TY ILI AB Singapore has a highDscore in the R O social dimension AFF performs well in and #3 terms of health and social inclusion. US A The infant mortality rate is lowGand E the averageTAL expectancy is high. life US N AG The unemployment rate is NME of the lowest. However, one E O VIR educational attainmentNamong the citizens is not as E high as in other high-performing cities in the social Singapore dimension. SO T EN NM O VIR The city scores well in the economic dimension. Singapore has high productivity and ranks high in the Y SO IT US CIfuture competitiveness G A owing to Ia BL AL E DA OR F good business environment with AF many business startups. For example, Singapore ranks as number one on the World Bank’s ranking of the ease of doing business. While Singapore has a high level of tertiary educational attainment among the citizens, EN employmentMinTknowledge-intensive services is not as N high asENVIRmany other top-performing cities. in O Singapore INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC EN Singapore performs below average in the environmental TY SO ILI C dimension.IAThe CO2 emissions in the cityBare above L DA R average and the energy consumptionFO high, especially AF is INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITYICT MATURITY A RD L FO T AF A EN Singapore performs well in the ICT AG M E ON V dimension, including the usageIRof ICT. EN The city has one of the highest scores in technology use, with a high pen-ENTAL US US AG NM AG E etration rate for smartphones, VcomE IRO EN puters and tablets. While the score in Singapore individual use is not as high, the usage is above average. The city performs better in market and public use, US with good open data services and above-average rate AG E of electronic payments. T EN NM O VIR INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE CIA TRIPPLE BOTTOMTRIPPLE BOTTOM LINEBOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOMTRIPPLE BOTTOM LINEBOTTOM LINE LINE LINE TRIPPLE TRIPPLE VIR EN SO DA R FO AF E TY I BIL E ECONOMIC N IRO M ON L TA EN AG E AG ECONOMIC #3 ECONOMIC ECONOMIC AG US ECONOMIC US L #3 US ECONOMIC L IAL ECONOMIC CIA TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC A NT ME E SO FF US NV TY ILI AB D OR CIA of fossil fuels. On the other hand, the TY S ILI CI #3 AB pollution levelOinALthe city is very low. RD FO AF This is probably an outcome of the city government’s focus on the green NT ME Y SO ICT solutions such as LIT ON city Iand green C NTAL US DAB VIR IAL AG EN R ME the Road Pricing (ERP) FO E Electronic ON #3 AF VIR EN System to manage road congestion. The city also has a TY SO low amount of waste per capita and a highBrecycling rate. ILI C ECONOMIC ECONOMIC TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE Singapore ranks #3 in the Networked Society City Index and performs equally well in usage, infrastructure and ITY SO affordability. It has the highest ranking among the Asian BIL CIA DA L OR cities. TheFInfocomm Development Authority of SingaF A pore (IDA) was formed in 1999 in response to the growing convergence of information technology and telephony. Since 2005, IDA’s work has been guided by #3 the Intelligent Nation 2015 master plan, which seeks to transform Singapore into “An Intelligent Nation, A Global City, Powered by Infocomm.” In 2012, Singapore had rolled out fiber to 95 percent NTALall properties. Both of US AG ME E fixed and mobile broadband speeds are relatively high. ON VIR EN Singapore also has one of the highest penetration rates ICT MATURITY MIC modern toll roads. During the last decades, many green initiatives have been launched in both the public and private sectors. According to the National Climate Change Secretariat in Singapore, the city’s green ICT industry comprises more than 80 of the top 100 software and service companies in the world. SO BI DA OR F AF Singapore performs well in fixed and EN US AG E mobile broadband quality, and the infrastructure access is also very TY SO ILI CI good. Of Singapore’sTresidential and AB AL EN RD NM FO non-residential Vpremises, 95 percent IRO AF EN can access the ultra-high-speed Next Generation Nationwide Broadband Network, which NT SO one ITY makes SingaporeI NME of the most fiber-dense cities in C BIL RO L A DA VI OR EN the world FF A The mobile phone tariffs are low in the SO ITY Singapore C BIL city, but the fixedIAbroadband prices L DA R FO AF are not as low as in many other high -​ anking cities. On the other hand, the r citizens have a very fast broadband Singapore connection. The IP transit prices are relatively high compared to other cities of similar performance in ICT, which is a disadvantage in terms of global competition. Singapore #4 Paris Paris is the cosmopolitan capital of France, with 2.2 million people living in the central city and almost 12 million people in the metropolitan area. The population density is one of the highest in the developed world, only slightly lower than Manhattan. Paris’ economy has gradually shifted towards high valueadded service industries and high-tech manufacturing. However, it remains an important manufacturing center of Europe, especially in industrial sectors. The Paris Region is home to the headquarters of 30 Fortune Global 500 companies. Paris Region is one of Europe’s biggest providers of jobs in IT and has around 70 schools and universities providing high-level IT and telecommunications courses to more than 20,200 students each year. Paris is ranked #4 in the Networked Society City Index. The city performs exceptionally well in all ICT and the Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES  7
  7. 7. TY ILI AB RD SO FFO AC IAL INFRASTRUCTURE SO O VIR INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC CIA Paris performs well in the social L ITY BI dimension. However, itAisL somewhat D OR FF below its peers inAterms of educational attainment and infant mortality rates. US A The city is facing the challengeGof #4 E Y SO LIT BI unemployment. Paris has taken CIA DA L R FO actions to Fimprove social sustainability. For example, a A major urban renewal project, including various economic, AL US NT AG ME cultural, housing, transportNand environmental projects, E Paris IRO was launched in 2007 toV achieve better integration of the EN #4 T city’s districts and to EN revitalize the metropolitan economy. NM EN ECONOMIC O VIR TY ILI SO INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC The city performs well above average AL US NT in the economic dimension. Paris’ AG S ME TY E OC ON has gradually shiftedBILI IR Ieconomy AL DA NV E OR towards high-value-addedFservice AF US AG industries and high-tech manufacturE ing, and the city’s GDP per capita is high. Paris achieves a good result in economic competitiveness, mainly in business startups, employment in knowledge intensive services, patents and tertiary educational attainment, having a lowerUscore in busiSA Paris GE E ness startups.NT NM EN INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC CIA AB The city’s environmental performance L RD FO AF is particularly strong on the pollution SO ITY CI indicator. In recent years, the general BIL AL DA R FO livability of Paris has been improved AF NT ME by reducing pollution and improving ON #4 VIR EN facilities for transportation, including cycle paths, pedestrian districts and faster metro lines. Y Paris performs around average in theAareasITof climate SO L IL CI US NT AB AL A and has less energy consumption ME RD and CO2 emissionsGE FO ON AF VIR than the average, which is especially good compared to EN Paris other cities in developed countries. ECONOMIC While Paris performs above average in the ICT usage, it performs worse than many comparable highly-developed cities. Paris has a well-develParis oped open data source environment and scores high on individual usage. US INFRASTRUCTURE AG E 8  Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES NT ME NV N IRO INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY EN INFRASTR ICT MAT INFRASTRUCT ICT MATURIT O VIR BOTTOM LINE T E L TA EN NM O VIR EN US AG E ECONOMIC AG #4 EN NM TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE US However, the overall result is affectedALby a modest T US EN AG E adaptation to new technologies. NM example, Paris has O For IR NV a rather low penetration rateEof smartphonesUand SA GE tablets. Paris scores very high in access to ICT in general and is top performing in terms of high-speed mobile broadband and Wi-FiT hotspots. A few N US ME AG years ago, the VIRON of Paris contracted city E EN the second largest mobile telecommunications operator in France to supply and integrate IT an urban Wi-FiSOC network in the city, resulting in veryYgood BIL IAL DA access to free wireless broadband for bothFFcitizens and OR A visitors. While large investments have been made in T EN fiber technology,Omore needs to be done. The city also NM VIR performs well Nin broadband quality. E SO CIA L ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC TY ILI AB RD FO AF ECONOMIC TBL dimensions. Fiber is accessible in a number of districts and a few years ago, TAL large investments were US N A made in fiberGtechnology, ONME aiming for Paris to be the E VIR EN leading European region for high-speed access. #4 ONOMIC PLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC #4 Paris scores high in the ICT affordTY SO ILI CI AB ability dimension.ALLow tariffs in fixed RD FO Paris AF broadband together with low transit prices indicate that Parisian citizens possess a competitive market with reasonable prices. Mobile phone tariffs have been quickly decreasing due to the fierce competition driven by the last entrant in the market. Paris #5 Copenhagen Copenhagen is the capital of Denmark. With an urban population of 1.2 million and a metropolitan population of 2.0 million it is Denmark’s most populous city. Since the completion of the transnational Øresund Bridge, Copenhagen has become increasingly integrated with the south of Sweden. Together they are slowly merging into an Øresund region with about 4 million people. Copenhagen has some of the highest gross wages in the world. Lower taxation of foreign specialists has made Denmark a more attractive location for foreign labor. However, income taxation in Denmark and Copenhagen is high and the city is ranked among the most expensive in Europe. Copenhagen is the cultural, economic and governmental center of Denmark and it is regarded as one of the financial centers of Northern Europe. Life sciences is an important sector and R&D plays a major role in the economy. Copenhagen is taking a leadership role in sustainable innovation. The city has committed to carbon neutrality by 2025 and 40 percent of its citizens regularly commute by bicycle. Copenhagen achieves the fifth highest ranking in the Networked Society City Index. It performs well above average in all six dimensions of ICT and TBL. Copenhagen is the ICT center in Denmark and the region is particularly advanced in areas connected to the use of ICT in specific areas such as health and robot technology, energy technology and network technology, mobile communication and software development.
  8. 8. NM AL NT E NM AG E INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE A US INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ITY FO AF INFRA #6 US AG E AL NT ME ON VIR EN US AG ECONOMIC ECONOMIC CI BIL L E While Oslo performs exceptionally well in the TBL part of the index, it is ranked #6 in the overall Networked Society City Index. Despite the growth of the ICT sector, a furtherenhanced ICT infrastructure would advance the city to a US AG higher level. As TICT is a key tool in all types of business, E N government ME households, further investments are and ON IR essentialVto spur progress in all sectors of Oslo society. EN SO A RD E ECONOMIC ECONOMIC T EN While internet accessibility in CopenNM IRO hagen is good,Vthe overall result is EN lowered by a low score in Wi-Fi hotspots. BroadbandTquality is fairly N SO ME good in terms ofCOAN Ispeed in both fixed VIR L EN and mobile broadband. CIA L TA EN NM O VIR EN AG E NM Copenhagen performs fairly ENVIRO in well ICT usage. A relatively low penetraCopenhagen tion level of mobile subscriptions and tablets is balanced by a higher US AG penetration rate of smartphones and E computers. On an individual level, the Copenhagen usage is well developed and as numbers of computers US and connectivity suggest, the population is willing to AG E test and embrace new technology. SO FF F A AF NT US AG E TY ILI AB D OR TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC ICT MATURITYICT MATURITY #6 ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINEBOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE Copenhagen is ranked highest of all cities in the enviNT ronmental dimension. It is a clean city ME ITY ON S BI VIR withL levels Copenhagenvery low OCIAL of pollution. Due DA EN OR FF to the high living standard, Copenha#5 A gen, like all developed cities, contribT TY SO EN ILI CI NM utes to climate changeBin terms of A OL DA R VIR EN FFL use of resources ATAO (waste and energy) US #5 EN AG M and CO2 emissions. However, E ON VIR EN compared to other cities in developed countries, SO ITY CI BIL AL DA Copenhagen performs well in these areas. OR L TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC CIA L INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC AB RD FO AF Oslo is the economic and governmental center of Norway and has a strong, diversified economy. The city is a hub of Norwegian trade, banking, industry and shipping. It is an important center for maritime industries and maritime ITY SO trade in Europe.ILIn addition, a large number of oil and gas B CIA DA L companies OR situated in Oslo. The oil industry has a are FF A huge effect on the country’s economy. ECONOMIC O The city performs less well in the VIR EN economic dimension. While the GDP per capita is high in Copenhagen, there SO are many cities in the index with higher ITY CI BIL US AL AG results. Copenhagen scores ORDA in high E FF A economic competitiveness, measured by business startups, patents, employment in knowledge intensive services, and IinYtertiarySO educational attainment. US LIT O VIR EN AL INFRASTRUCTURE E NM For several years Oslo has been listed as one of the most expensive cities in the world. Although Oslo has the most expensive housing market in Norway, it is comparably cheaper than other cities in that regard. Meanwhile, prices of goods and services remain some of the highest of any city in the world. INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC NT US AG E INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE AL ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY CI TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE Copenhagen performs well and TY ILI above average in the DAB social dimenR O TY FF S the index,Ashowing no excepILI sion of OC AB IAL RD tional results in health and social FO #5 AF inclusion. The city’s unemployment US AG and homicide rates leave room Efor L improvement. A good education is an important factor TA US EN #5 GE for finding a Ajob in the city’sMknowledge-based busiON VIR nesses and Copenhagen is among the top-ranked cities EN Copenhagen in terms of education. SO INFRASTRUCTURE SO CIA L Oslo is the capital and the most populous city of Norway. The municipality has 627,000 inhabitants and the metropolitan area has a population of about 1 million. The population is increasing at a high rate, making Oslo one of the fastest growing cities in Europe. It is highly ranked in terms of quality of life and regarded as one of the world’s greenest and most livable cities. ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE Copenhagen #6 Oslo EN NM O VIR EN TY ILI AB RD FO AF L TA ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE #5 US AG E E ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC AG O VIR EN Copenhagen is ranked #1 in the ICT TY SO ILI CI AB AL affordability dimension, together with RD FO AF the other North European cities. Low tariffs in fixed and mobile broadband together with low transit prices indicate that Copenhageners enjoy a competitive market with reasonable prices. SO CIA L US NT N IRO V EN TY ILI AB RD FO AF E NM NT ME IRO V EN INFRASTRUCTURE US AG E Oslo is outperforming other cities in TY ILI the social dimensionRDAB the index, of T FO EN AF with above-average scores in health, NM RO VI education, safety and inclusion. The EN city has an extensive public service and a high standard of living. Y SO CI SO CI AF F Copenhagen D OR TY ILI AB AL R FO IT BIL DA AL AF Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES  9 Oslo
  9. 9. VIR EN ITY L SO ICT MATURITY BIL A RD CIA L FO INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY ECONOMIC Hong Kong ranks high inITthe social Y IL IAL AB dimension and performs well in terms RD FO AF of health and social inclusion. The infant mortality is the lowest of the #7 US AG cities included in the index andE average life expectancy is very high. The unemployment rate is oneAof the lowest. However, L US NT A ME compared toGother cities with a high score in the social E ON VIR dimension, Hong Kong’s educational attainment among EN Hong Kong citizens is lower. T EN NM O VIR Despite its good business environment, Hong Kong’s economic dimension is not ranked as high as the Y SO IT CIsocial dimension. While Hong AKong BIL AL D US OR has high productivity, AGE AFF other many cities in the index have a higher GDP EN ECONOMIC Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China. The population is 7 million and Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. E M ON E TA EN AG ECONOMIC #7 Hong Kong Oslo #7 TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE R FO AF B DA AG NT NV AF SO C L TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TY ILI CIA US ME N IRO E Oslo is ranked #1 for ICT affordability. SO CI AL The city offers affordable ICT for its Oslo inhabitants, with low tariffs for both fixed and mobile broadband, and affordable transit prices, reflecting what seems toOslo competitive ICT market. be a A US A SO FF ECONOMIC ECONOMIC Internet coverage NMEalmost 100 is US O AG V number of broadband percent, but theIR E EN users is not that extended. Oslo’s T relatively modest performance in ICT EN SO NM ITY CI RA BIL infrastructure isVIaOresult of moderate L DA N R E FO expansion of, and access to fiber, highAF speed mobile broadband and Wi-Fi hotspots. While T EN SO ITY broadband speedsMin the city are quite high, international CI N BIL OAL DA VIR O internet bandwidth capacity can be improved. R EN FF ECONOMIC ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC NT TY ILI AB D OR INFRASTRUCTURE O FF INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE M ON TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE E ECONOMIC AG VIR Oslo performs fairly well in terms ofA EN ICT usage. Norway has a highly L educated population with early TA US EN AG E adoption of new technology such M ON as VIR US E AG smartphones, and Oslo has aN high E rate of mobile subscribers. Oslo Oslo scores high in individual and market use, but the usage US result is negatively affected by a less developedGopen A E data source environment. IT SO Hong Kong ranksY#7 in the Networked Society City BIL CIA DA L OR Index andFperforms especially well in ICT usage. Since F A 1998, the Digital 21 Strategy has set out the government’s vision of developing Hong Kong into a leading digital city. The Hong Kong ICT Awards was established #7 in 2006 as a collaborative effort by the industry, academia and the government. The objective is to recognize and to promote further achievements. Hong Kong L citizens and businesses haveNaccess to fast broadband, TA US AG ME E many wireless hotspots and the penetration of smartON VIR phones and tablets is EN high. While Hong Kong was rapidly industrialized as a manufacturing center, driven by exports, it now has a major service-based economy with low taxation and free 10  Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES T EN NV NM Hong Kong IRO INFRASTRUCTURE TY ECONOMIC ECONOMIC AL INFRASTRUCTURE S I O IL AB Oslo performsCwell inDtheI environIAL AB RD FO OR AF mental #6 dimension,FFwith low CO2 A emissions and pollution considerably T lower Ythan theCaverage, mainly due to SO ILI NT AB IAL ME RD ON L Ousing climate-friendly hydropower for F #6 TA VIR AFUS EN EN AG the city’s rail-based public transport. NM E O VIR However, Oslo scores less well in the use of resources, EN SO with average waste per capita and energy ILITY consumption. L Oslo CIAL TA DAB US #6 EN R CI Hong Kong is a leading center for management, financial, IT, business consultation and professional services, with one of the greatest concentrations of corporate headquarters in the Asia-Pacific region. The Hong Kong Stock Exchange is the seventh largest in the world. Hong Kong is the world’s eleventh largest trading entity with the total value of imports and exports exceeding its GDP Much of . Hong Kong’s exports consist of re-exports, which are products made outside of the territory, especially in mainland China, and distributed via Hong Kong. ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE Y LIT TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY MATURITY ICT ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC SO trade. The currency, the Hong Kong dollar, is the eighth most traded currency in the world. Hong Kong has one of the world’s highest per-capita incomes. It has numerous high international rankings in various aspects such as economic competitiveness, quality of life and corruption perception. INFRASTRUCTURE #6 With the highest GDP per capita of all cities included in the Networked Society City Index, Oslo scores high AL US NT in the economic dimension, mainly AG ME N E US AG due NVIRthe oil industry’sEinfluence on to O E the Norwegian economy. Oslo is the business center of Norway and the impact of the oil industry is visible. Oslo performs well in economic competitiveness and is equally strong and above average in employment in knowledge-intensive services T EN as well as inMtertiary educational attainment. However, TY SO ILI ON CIA AB US VIR its performance regarding business startups and L RD EN AG FO AF E patents could be enhanced. ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY O VIR EN TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE GE
  10. 10. SA GE ON VIR ECONOMIC per capita. The city performs well in terms of future competitiveness owing to good business environment with many business startups. However, the education level among the citizens and employment in the knowlU edge-intensive services are not as high Sas in many other AG E top-performing cities. ILITY S OC IAL ICT MATURITY A RD AL INFRASTRUCTURE D OR SO CIA L FF A AG #8 US NT O CI AL ECONOMIC New York City has a population of over 8 million and it is the largest city in the United States. The New York Metropolitan Area has about 22 million inhabitants, which makes it one of the most populated urban areas in the world. L New York performs well inITY social the IL dimension of the index,AB especially in RD FO A terms of educationFwhere it performs best of the included AmericanScities. U AG E The city’s score for the health indicator is above average. The social inclusion indicator with slightly above-average values for both unemployment and homicide rates leaves room for improvement. New York SO #8 New York VIR EN E NM VIR EN Hong Kong E M ON E TA EN AG The mobile phone tariffs in Hong TY SO ILI CI AB Kong are low, butAL fixed broadband RD FO AF prices are not as low as in many other Hong Kong cities with a high ranking. On the other hand, the citizens have one of the fastest broadband speeds among the cities. The IP transit prices are relatively high compared to other well-performing cities in ICT. TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE US ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY TY ILI AB INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC FO The broadband speeds in Hong Kong AF are the highest among the cities in the index. However, regarding the mobile US AG T broadband quality, the city does not E EN NM perform equally IRO The internet well. V EN access is high among the citizens and Hong Kong is one of the most fiber-dense cities globally. Hong SKong ITY Hong Kong hasOmany wireless hotspots. It also provides CI BIL AL DA computers with an internet connection for freeRpublic use FO AF NT ME at convenient locations such as public libraries, commuON VIR nity cyber points and district cyber centers. EN T EN INFRASTRUCTURE ITY BIL CI ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC SO New York ranks #8 in the Networked Society City Index and it performs well in each of the ICT dimensions of usage, infrastructure and affordability. New York is ranked highest out of all cities outside Europe. The city has a Y SO well-developedBIinfrastructure and can offer high quality LIT CIA DA services atFOR affordable prices.L For example, it has a F A developed open data site and high rate of electronic payments. The slight weakness lies in the relatively low proportion of the population with internet access and low #8 amount of smartphones. However, projects are being developed to increase the connectivity of New Yorkers. For example, AT&T has developed a number of solarL powered street charge stationsAfor smartphones, which T US EN AG E can be seen as a statementMconcerning the importance ON VIR EN of ICT and the environment. INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY ECONOMIC Hong Kong performs well#7 all ICT in TY dimensions, especiallyLIin ICT usage. SO I CIA AB L The city has the FFORD highest technology A use, with high penetration rates for L A US Hong Kong USA AG mobile phones, smartphones, com-NT ME GE E ON IR puters and tablets. Even if the Vcity’s EN result in the individual use#7 not equally good, it is still is above the average. The city performs better in market and public use, with good open data services and quite high usage of electronic payments. NTAL the past Over US AG NT ME EE decade, the government has made a full range of ON M VIR ON E information available through Nits websites and a variety VIR EN US or of electronic services are accessible by phone AG E internet. Many districts and landmarks in the city have become well known to its approximately 50 million annual visitors. The financial district, anchored by Wall Street in Lower Manhattan, has been called the world’s leading financial center and it is home to the New York Stock Exchange. Manhattan’s real estate market is among the most expensive in the world. TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ICT MATURITY TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC Hong Kong performs above average in the environmental dimension. Its pollution values are better than in T many other cities and almost all the #7 EN NM wastewater is treated. The city’s per RO VI EN capita impact on climate change is quite low compared to cities of the same economic Y AL US SO NT LIT A ABI SO CIM ITY performance. While GHong Kong hasE a high Irecycling rate CI BL ON AL RDE AL DA FO VIR F R N and the amountAof waste per Eperson isOaround average, it F AF has relatively high fossil fuel energy consumption. INFRASTRUCTURE AB RD FO AF In 2010, The Urban Elite Global Cities Index ranked New York one of the most global cities based on five aspects of globalization: business activity, human capital, information exchange, cultural experience, and political engagement. A total of 26 Fortune Global 500 companies have their headquarters in the city and New York is arguably the strongest global center of international business activity. The city exerts a significant global impact upon finance, media, art, fashion, research technology, education and entertainment. INFRASTRUCTURE EN Since New York hasM second highest GDP per capita ON the VIR E of the included Ncities, it is no surprise that the city is ITY SO BIL C IAL Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY DA R PROFILES  11 FO AF
  11. 11. E M ON L TA EN AG VIR INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE SO CIA O VIR N L E EN ITY INFRASTRUCTURE NT E NM T INFRASTRUCTURE SO HelsinkiCoffers a high quality of life to IAL ITY BIL its inhabitants. It performs exception#9 DA R FO AF ally well and above average in the social dimension of the index, with US equally high Ascores in health, AGE educaL T #9 US N AG ME tion andNinclusion. However, the E IRO unemployment rate stillVleaves some room for improveEN ment. AL NT Helsinki USAGE ME ON IR Helsinki performs well above average TV EN EN inMthe economic dimension. The ON VIR productivity measured through the EN GDP per capita and economic US AG competitiveness measured through TY SO E ILI CI AB AL business startups, patents, tertiary RD O FF educational attainment and employment in Aknowledge intensive services score high, even if the result does not US AG stand out in comparison to several similarE cities. BIL DA CI OR F A AF L SO INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTUREINFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTUREINFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITYICT MATURITY Helsinki is the capital and largest city of Finland. The municipality has 611,000 inhabitants and the population of the Helsinki metropolitan area is 1.4 million, representing more than 25 percent of Finland’s population. Helsinki receives high positions in many rankings listing the most livable cities in the world. Finland is known to have one of the best educational systems in Europe and NT IL EAB R NMD F ROO I VAF AL E TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE #9 Helsinki AG #9 US AG E ITY ECONOMIC New York US TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINEBOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE F AF L ECONOMIC TY ILI AB D OR CIA ECONOMIC The leading ICT indicator for New York New York SO CI AL is affordability, with very competitive broadband and mobile cellular tariffs and the IP transit prices on a global scale. This could imply challenges in New York other areas where the city has to develop its use of ICT even further. AF ECONOMIC A SO FO ECONOMIC New York hasEa well-developed ICT US AG infrastructure concerning broadband E quality, with both fiber and LTE well TY SO ILI CI AB AL NT established in society. However, E RD FO NM AF internet accessVIcould be further RO EN enhanced; for example, the number of hotspots is slightly below average. It seems that the T EN S I to inhabitants andOpublic sector need to adjust moreTY CONM BIL IAL DA VIR these new possibilities. OR EN FF ITY BIL A RD ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC NV TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC N ME N IRO Helsinki is the main ICT cluster in Finland and ranks #9 in the Networked Society CityTAL Index. Finland is a highly US EN AG E advanced country whenIRONM it comes to the production and V EN application of telecommunication services. ECONOMIC TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC AL New York US reasonably wellENT #8 New York performsAG NM E considering ICT usage. The cityRO VI is EN New many hostingYork ICT initiatives, including free Wi-Fi in 32 parks and several NTAL US US E AG AG N E subway stations, free solar mobileM E IRO NV E charging stations and deployment of fiber optic cabling. This dimension can be summarized by the fact that public, market and individual use are clear strengths, while the city’s performance USAG in terms of E technology use is average. T Helsinki is Finland’s major political, educational, financial, cultural and research center. The Helsinki metropolitan area generates approximately one third of TY Finland’s GDP Band 83 ofSOC 100 largest Finnish compathe ILI A IAL RD nies are headquartered in the city. Approximately 70 FO AF percent of multinational companies operating in Finland have settled in the Helsinki region. Finland is well known for its design and was chosen as the World Design Capital for 2012. #9 ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC TY SO New IYork’s performance in the BIL CIA DA L R E Oenvironmental dimension leaves room FF NM A O VIR for improvement. The city uses a lot EN T of resources, which is not fully EN NM compensated for by the fact that a lot RO VI ITY SO TY S EN O #8 BIL CIA CI ofAwaste is recycled. The I consumpBIL AL L RD DA R FO FO tion of energy isAFmostly based on fossil fuels. At the AF SO ITY same time, New York has low concentrations of particuCI BIL AL DA Y L T late matter in theUair even though theFAnitrogen dioxide SO T OR ILI CIA EN F SA DAB M A G emissions still standEout. The climate indicator has a OR ON L F #8 NVIR AF E lower value due to above-average emissions of carbon dioxide. NT was recently ranked as one of the world’s most peaceful and economically competitive nations. INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE EN one of the highest achieving on the economic dimension. It is a competitive city with an above-average result for both employment in knowledgeU AG intensive services as Swell as in E tertiary educational attainment. U and However, its result in business startups SA patents GE does not quite reach the same level. ICT MATURITY US ICT MATURITYICT MATURITY I O VIR EN INE GE Helsinki is a clean city and performs very well regarding pollution. As EN Helsinki Helsinki is a highly developed city with a high standard of living, the NT SO NME ITY CO city’s impact on climateILchange is B I DA VIR AL R EN FO notable. The environmental perforAF mance is affected by the use of resources. Compared to SO other similar cities, Helsinki scores high inILterms of ITY CI AB AL RD recycled waste. FO 12  Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES EN NM O VIR AF Helsinki Helsinki
  12. 12. INFRASTRUCTURE AG INFRASTRUCTURE CIA L US AG #10 US T E VIR EN EN M ON M ON VIR EN E L TA EN AG Helsinki offers affordable ICT for city FO TY SO AF Helsinki ILI C dwellers, with lowIAtariffs for fixed and AB L RD FO mobile broadband as well as affordAF able transit prices, reflecting a competitive ICT market. The high penetration rates of new communication devices, low prices and the success of Finnish telecom Helsinki service and equipment producers can be explained by the early liberalization of the Finnish telecom market. Helsinki INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE A TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ITY BIL Tokyo has a high score inITthe social Y IL AB dimension and performs very well in RD O health, education AFF social inclusion. and mortality is low and theS average U ITYInfant S OC AG BIL IAL DA life expectancy is very high. The E OR F AF unemployment rate is one of the lowest. The educational attainment among the citizens is one of the highest. Japan has an aging society with a TY ILI birth rate declining #10theSOCIA at world’s fastest pace. The Tokyo ORDAB L FF i-Japan Strategy 2015NT has pointed out healthcare as one A E M of the three priorityNareas in aiming to create a citizenO VIR EN driven, reassuring and vibrant TAL digital city to meet the U N ME challenges SAGthe future. Telemedicine technologies and in E N #10 IRO digital infrastructure are Vjust an example of the measures EN TY SO ILI CI A to be taken to raise Lthe efficiency of healthcare RDAB work. O CI ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY TRIPPLE BOTTOMTRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE LINE ECONOMIC Described as an alpha+ world city by the Globalization and World Rankings Research Institute, Tokyo is known as one of the three “command centers” for the world economy, along with New York City and London. Tokyo is a major international finance center and houses the headquarters of several of the world’s largest investment banks and insurance companies. It also serves as a hub for Japan’s transportation, telecommunication, publishing and broadcasting industries. Although Japan is not fully recovered after the financial crisis in the late 1980s, Tokyo is one of the leading engines in Asia. ECONOMIC Tokyo, the capital of Japan, is the largest metropolitan area in the world. It hosts approximately 35 million people and is the world’s largest urban agglomeration economy. ECONOMIC #10 Tokyo AL L TA INFRASTRUCTURE SO INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE A RD SO FF ECONOMIC ECONOMIC AL ECONOMIC CI D OR TY ILI AB E Helsinki has fairly good broadband SO ITY C speed in fixed and quality regarding IAL BIL DA R FO mobile broadband. Both internet AF access and access ENT high-speed to NM mobile broadband are widespread. IRO NV T EN However, the E city performs less well in NM IRO V internet bandwidth capacity and has few Wi-Fi hotspots. EN SO CIA F AF The city scores well in the economic EN NM IRO dimension. Tokyo has high productivV EN ity and ranks high in competitiveness owing to high education level among U AG the citizens and high Sapplication level E for patents. The knowledge intensiveTokyo ness in the economy is not as high as in many other top performing cities. Despite high productivity, the city has had modest economic growth. Increasing the efficiency US AG E of economy will be crucial in order to compete globally. US AG E ECONOMIC ECONOMIC Tokyo ranks #10 in the Networked Society City Index and performs quite well in infrastructure and affordability. It does not perform equally well in the ICT usage – just above average. While the rate of mobile phones and personal computers is high, the penetration of more advanced technology such as smartphones and tablets is low compared to other cities with high ICT performance. The internet use in Tokyo is just above average relative to other cities in the index. At the same time, the city, and the country, have high internet access, high NT ME N IRO INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC US SO L fiber penetration and high broadband speed. Tokyo has F AF a relatively good ICT infrastructure, but does not seem to use its potential to the same extent as many other cities. Japan has a very advanced and well-maintained #10 infrastructure, which undergoes regular upgrading and expansion. The telecommunication system consists of private and public service providers, although the public AL company Nippon Telephone Eand Telegraph (NTT) is the US NT AG M E largest provider, controlling about 95 percent of the ON VIR fixed telephone lines. EN ECONOMIC ECONOMIC #9 ICT usage score is high for Helsinki. Helsinki has earlier been a world L TA US EN leader in mobile subscriptions, partly AG NM E O L due to Finland’s leading role Ein IR NV the NTA US E US AG AG NM telecom market but also due toRthe E E I O NV E early liberalization of the telecom market and highly affordable prices. The use of Smartphones is very high in Helsinki. The computer penetration is one of the highest among the cities in the Networked Society City Index. The penetration of tablets US is however relativelyENT which lowered the overall very low, AG NM E high outcome NVIROthe ICT usage for E TY ILI AB D OR ICT MATURITY #9 TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTU O VIR EN ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY GE PPLE BOTTOM LINE LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM F AF Tokyo is one of the best-performing cities in the environmental dimension. The CO2 emissions in the city are TY SO ILI CI below average and especially low T AB AL EN RD M regarding the city’sFO economic perforON AF VIR EN mance. Both energy consumption and waste per person are low. Compared to other cities, T Tokyo’s SOC pollution levels are very low. Tokyo’s Ygood ILI IAL AB RD environmental performance can be partly explained by FO V EN AF Tokyo Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES  13
  13. 13. IL AB RD O FF SO CIA L INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE #11 Los Angeles performs below average TY ILI in the social dimensionBof the index DA R #11 FO AF and the overall result is lowered due to relatively Thigh rates of unemployAL US US N AG AG E ment and E L NM homicide. The city’s perforE RO A VI US NT E EN mance regarding health and educaAG M E ON tion is above average.ENVIR SO CI AL INFRASTRUCTURE Los Angeles is known to score high in economic power in various global T EN NM indexes and has a comparatively high IRO V EN GDP per capita. The economy is US AG clearly a major strengthEof the city. US However, the competiveness is not AG SO ITY CI E BIL AL DA higher than average. ILITY SO OR Los Angeles CIA L INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE AB RD FO AF F AF INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE Los Angeles is a city with high values for the use of resources, partly due to T EN the extended urban sprawl. The NM IRO consumption of energy is high and is #11 NT NV E E NM almost exclusively based on fossil IRO V EN fuel. Los Angeles However, the city is Iamong the TY SO CI BIL best for recycling waste. While Los Angeles has a low L AL TA RDA US EN SO ITY level of particulateAmatter in theOair, AFFO nitrogen dioxide GE NM the CI BIL AL DA VIR R emissions are high. The climate indicator with emissions EN FO AF of carbon dioxide leaves room for improvement. Los Angeles is considered among the top 10 in ICT maturity and one of the key technology hubs in the USA. This Los Angeles is also displayed in the ICT usage Los the city where Angelesperforms quite well. ECONOMIC 14  Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES NT ME US AG ASTRUCTURE The city has its own Information Technology Agency (ITA), responsible for planning, designing, implementing, operating and coordinating the city’s information AL T SO EN CIA NM L RO I SO NV CIA E L ECONOMIC The city is an important economic hub in the United States, with strengths in everything from business, media and fashion to science and sports. However, it is perhaps best known for its entertainment industry in Hollywood that has long been a world icon in the creation of films, television productions, video games and recorded music. TY ILI USA GE AB RD T ITY FO AF MENBIL A ON RD VIR FO EN AF E TRIPPLE BOTTOM TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE LINE Los Angeles has 3.4 million inhabitants and it is the second largest city in the United States. The Greater Los Angeles Area has a population of 15 million. The city is situated in California in western USA and is known for its mild climate, large highways, celebrities, shopping and beautiful beaches. It has been recognized as one of the most ethnically-diverse cities in the country. AG #11 ECONOMIC #11 Los Angeles US ECONOMIC ECONOMIC The affordability in Tokyo is good and TY TokyoSOCIA ILI AB clearly not a critical aspect in the L RD FO AF relatively low ICT usage compared to the good infrastructure. The fixed broadband prices are low, while the Tokyo mobile phone tariffs seem a bit over-priced compared to many high-ranked cities. The IP transit prices are relatively high in comparison to other cities that perform well in ICT. Tokyo SO CIA L ECONOMIC ECONOMIC A TY ILI AB RD FO AF ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC While Tokyo scores well in fixed US EN AG broadband quality, its result in mobile E broadband speed is not on the same SO ITY CI T level. At the sameALtime, the city has BIL EN DA R M FO ON many wireless hotspots. The internet AF VIR EN access and fiber penetration among the citizens are among the highest. Tokyo has a good NT SO but IT ICT infrastructure NME does not use its full potentialY to CO BIL VIR IAL DA the same degree as many other top-performing cities. EN OR FF ECONOMIC ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC T EN NM O VIR TY S Los Angeles ranks #11 inOthe Networked Society City ILI CIA AB RD O Index. The Fcity performs on L even and high level for an AF each of usage, infrastructure and affordability. The infrastructure is relatively well developed when it comes to the fixed and mobile components, even though the #11 broadband speeds and number of smartphones and subscriptions for mobile lag behind the better performing cities. A good example of ICT solutions is an initiaA tive startedSby Edge.LA – a hubL for start-up companies, U NT A ME ON which offers GE various resources to increase the flow of VIR EN technology and information among people. ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC AL #10 US Tokyo performs justG above averageENT in A NM E the ICT usage. The city has highOuse VIR EN of mobile phones and computers, but lower penetration S more advanced AL U for NT AG US ME E AG technologies such as smartphones ON IR E NV and tablets. The internet use Eis not high compared to other cities that perform well in the index and social network penetration among the US citizens is moderate. The use of electronic payments is AG E not high compared to most cities. technology system and networks, and for the delivery of information processing and communication services. TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY ECONOMIC the smart city, created in its suburbs in partnership with TY ILI Panasonic among others.#10 “eco-burb” will integrate The SOCIAL AB RD FO like solar panels, storage batteries Panasonic devices AF and light bulbs based on LEDs (light-emitting diodes) TY SO along with air-conditioners, washing Tmachines and floor L ILI CIA N A US DAB E R ML OAGE heating that can Fcommunicate with each other to F #10 VIRON A maximize energy efficiency. Tokyo city will also promote EN smart mobility solutions. ECONOMIC TRIPPLE BOTTOMTRIPPLE BOTTOM LINEBOTTOM LINE LINE TRIPPLE ICT MATURITY A E
  14. 14. NT ME TY ILI AB NV RD E FO AF N IRO ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE TY ILI AB D OR F ECONOMIC Los Angeles #12 Miami T EN NM O VIR INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ITY FO AF AF AL NT While Miami is considered a leader in ME ON economic terms, its performance in VIR EN the economic dimension of the index is average. The city has quite high US AG productivity as indicated by the GDP E per capita, but when it comes to economic competitiveness, Miami does not compare favorably to many other cities. This is mostly due to the U post-secondary educational attainment,Swhich holds the AG E lowest value of all the cities from developed countries. BIL The affordability of ICT in Los Angeles SO CI AL is undoubtedly competitive on a global scale. This is especially true for the low fixed broadband tariffs and IP transit prices. AL US AG E A RD AL CI ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY GE CI TRIPPLE BOTTOMTRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE LINE SA SO ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC SO SO CIA L Miami performs on an average level in Y LIT the social dimensionRDABIthe index. The of Y T SO FO ILI CIA AF city obtains relatively high values for #12 AB L RD FO health and education dimensions. AF Regarding the inclusion dimension, Miami has the second highest homiAL US NT AG the ME cide rate and E third highest unemployment rate out N #12 IRO of all cities in the study,Vwhich both affect the city’s EN performance negatively. Miami The performance in individual, market and technology usage is on a consistently even level, but as there are US no exceptionally good results, the city could further AG E enhance the usage on every level. U The ICT infrastructure in Los Angeles is well developed in terms of broadband quality and both fiber and LTE T have been implemented. However, EN NM internet accessVIcouldT be further RO EN improved. There is MEN N room for improveRO ment in manyENVI infrastructure indicators. INFRA VI EN INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE E Miami is oneSO the least polluted of CIA L cities in the study and has been SO ranked as oneCof the cleanest cities in IAL SO ITY CI the country in other studies. On the BIL AL EN DA R M F ON other hand, the cityOperforms less well AF VIR EN TY #12 I SO when it comes to recycling waste, BIL CIA DA L even though there R a city-wide recycling program in FO is AF #12 SO ITY place, and the relative consumption of non-fossil fuels. CI BIL AL DA LR The latter can lead to high emissionsAof carbon dioxide. T FO US EN F A GE To summarize, theAcity performs NM an average level in on L RO A #12 E VI US NT this dimension andGhas roomNfor improvement in its A ME E Miami ON IR environmental awareness to Ecounter these weaknesses. NV Miami ranks #12 in the Networked Society City Index and performs on an even and quite high level in each of the ICT dimensions of usage, infrastructure and affordability. The infrastructure is well developed in terms of the fixed and mobile parts, even though the broadband speeds and the number of smartphones and subscriptions for mobile lag behind the top-performing cities. However, projects are being developed to use the new possibilities. For example, Miami Children’s Hospital has recently launched a free iPhone application that uses Wi-Fi positioning to help patients and their families navigate through the hospital. Miami performs quite well when it ENTAL US AG M E ON comes to ICT usage. It has a consisVIR EN Miami tent level for all of the individual, market and technology indicators, but as there are no exceptionally high levels, the target should be to enhance the usage on all levels. INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY MATURITY ICT ICT MATURITY ECONOMIC L AG E US AG INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE E The ICT infrastructure in Miami is well US AG E developed when it comes to broadNT band quality, and NME fiber and LTE both RO T have been wellVIestablished. However, EN EN NM the internet access could be further RO VI EN improved as the number of hotspots Y SO LIT CI is quite small. Because the infrastructure is wellBIdevelA AL T RD N FO SO needs to adjust to the new possibilities ITY oped, the public ONME AF C BIL VIR IAL DA EN and utilize them on a wider scale. OR FF The affordability of ICT in Miami is SO C competitive on aIAL global scale. This is especially true for fixed broadband and IP transit prices. There is, howMiami ever, room for improvement in the Miami tariffs for mobile phones. TA EN M ON ECONOMIC ECONOMIC US AG E US A TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC #12 ECONOMIC SO CIA L ITY BIL DA OR F TY AF ILI AB RD FO TAF ECONOMIC ECONOMIC TY ILI AB RD FO AF EN TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE Los Angeles Miami has more than 400,000 inhabitants and the population of Miami Metropolitan Area is around 5.5 million, making it the eighth largest urban agglomeration in the US. In 2010, Miami was classified as an alpha world city by the World Cities Study Group. It is a leading player in finance, commerce, culture, media, entertainment arts, and international trade. It is also a major television production center and the most important city in the US for Spanish language media. Tourism is another important industry and the city attracts over 38 million visitors annually. ITY BIL A RD FO AF VIR EN Miami ECONOMIC Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES  15 US AG E
  15. 15. MIC F AF INFRASTRUCTURE TY ILI AB SO CIA L FF ICT MATURITY US AG #13 US AG E ITY T IL ENB DA NM OR FF RO I VA AL SO CIA O VIR N L E INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC Seol O INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC The Tcity does not perform equally N ME well in the economic dimension. ON VIR Compared to many other well- perEN forming cities, Seoul gets a relatively US AG lower score in this dimension. While E SO ITY CI BIL AL competitiveness is above average, its DA OR AF productivity is below average. The citizens of FSeoul have a high educational attainment and the number of patent applications is above average. The proportion of knowledge-intensive services is average compared to the T other cities NinEN index. M the VIR Seol CI AF F D OR TY ILI AB AL INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE Seol O Seoul performs wellEin ICT usage. The VIR EN rates of computer use and penetration for more advanced technologies such as smartphones and tablets are US AG high. The same is true for both E internet use and the use of electronic US payments. The city has a well-developed openAdata GE homepage. U Seoul performs well in both fixed T EN broadband and mobile broadband NM IRO V quality. The international bandwidth EN capacity is not so high compared to NT ME ON the other top-performing cities. The VR SI NT EN O I internet access COANalmost 100 percent. is ME R L VI EN The city has many wireless hotspots. SO SA GE TY ILI AB D OR F AF CI TY ILI AB A L Compared to other well-performing SO CI AL cities with a similar income level, the fixed broadband and mobile phone tariffs in Seoul are not as low as expected. The IP transit prices are Seol relatively high in the city. D OR F AF ITY BIL A RD FO AF Taipei is the capital of the island state Taiwan in southeast China. Located on the northern tip of Taiwan, the city has a population of about 2.6 million, while the metropolitan area has almost 7 million inhabitants. Taipei is the political, economic and cultural center of Taiwan. Considered a global city, Taipei is part of a major industrial area. The city is home to Taiwan’s democratically elected national government. As Taiwan’s largest metropolis, Taipei has been at the center of rapid economic development in the country and has now become one of the global cities in the production of high-tech products and its components. This is part of the so-called Taiwan Miracle, which refers to the dramatic industrialization and economic growth in the state since the 1960s. Together with Singapore, South Korea and Hong Kong, Taiwan has become known as one of the “Four Asian Tigers.” 16  Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES SO AL NT E NM #14 Taipei Seol Seoul has a high score inITthe social Y SO CI BIL AL #13 dimension and performs well in health, DA R FO AF education and social inclusion. Infant mortality is low and the average life US AG expectancy Tis high. The unemployE AL US N E AG ment rate is low and the educational NM E IRO attainment among the ENV citizens is high. Seoul is one of the best-performing cities in the social dimension. EN ON VIR EN Seol TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE INFRASTRUCTURE E NT E NM EN ICT MATURITY TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE INFRASTRUCTURE A ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC D OR INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY ECONOMIC TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE Seoul ranks #13 in the Networked Society City Index and performs well in usage, infrastructure and affordability. The use of electronic payments is high among the citizens. Seoul #13 a very high internet access, high has fiber penetration and a high broadband speed. South Korea has been ranked as number one in ITU’s ICT AL development index. “Smart Seoul 2015,” the Strategic US NT AG ME E Plan for Informatization ofON Seoul, is aiming to make VIR E Seoul the city that bestN applies smart technologies. AG INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE IAL TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE A D OR E US ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC Since the Korean War, Seoul has been the focus of immense reconstruction and modernization efforts. Today, Seoul is considered a leading and rapidly rising global city, resulting from an economic boom since the 1980s. With its Digital Media City, Seoul is the world leader in technology and boasts well-known multinaI such as Samsung and LG. SO tional companiesTY BIL C E ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC Seoul, the capital and largest metropolitan area of South Korea, is a megacity that hosts a population of more than 10 million. The Seoul Capital Area is the world’s second largest metropolitan area with over 25.6 million people, home to over half of South Korea’s population. AG Seoul’s performance in the environmental dimension is average. The Y CO2ITemissions are low compared to SO IL CIA AB L RD T FOthe city’s economic performance. The N ME AF ON low energy consumption can be VIR ITY EN BIL explained bySOCIsmart metering a AL DA R TY FO S has introduced smart initiative. The Seoul governmentOC ILI AF B IAL DA #13 SO meters toCreduceFOR city’s total energy useTY 10 the I by AF BIL IAL DA percent by recording the consumption Rof electricity, FO AF water and gas in homes, #13 offices and in factories. However, the levels of pollution are NTAL above average and US E #13 the total waste perAGE capita is the ONM highest among the VIR E cities. The very high recyclingNrate compensates for the AL high waste levelsUSAG some extent. MENT to ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY #13 Seoul US
  16. 16. CIA L TRIPPLE BOTTOM TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE LINE NT L INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTUREINFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY ECONOMIC ECONOMIC Taipei has a high score inTY social the SO I CI BIL AL dimension and performs well in DA OR ITY S FF BIL health, OCI #14 educationAand social incluAL DA R FO sion. The infant mortality rate is low AF US AG E and the average life expectancy is L high. The unemployment rate is low TA US EN AG and the educational attainment among the citizens is NM E RO #14 I EN high. Taipei is one of theV best-performing cities in the social dimension. Taipei A E NT The city does not score equally well NM ME E N ON R E in theVIeconomic dimension. ComEN pared to many other well-performing a SO cities in the index, Taipei obtains ITY US CI BIL AL relatively lower score. ABoth OproductivDA GE R F AF ity and competitiveness are around average. Taipei does not have as many business startups and patent applications as other top-performing cities in the index. The education level and knowledge US AG intensiveness in the economy are high. E O VIR AG ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTUREINFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC T EN NM O VIR Taipei performs well in the environmental dimension. The CO2 emissions in the city are belowY average SO IT CI B to and very low compared IL the city’s T AL N DA ME OR F economic performance. The energy ON AF VIR EN consumption is low, as is waste per capita. Taipei’s good performance is not only due to Y good results in the use of resources, and inITthe areas of SO IL C EN Taipei IAL Taipei AB RD FO AF INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE R FO AF INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE Taipei performs well in both fixed US AG broadband and mobile broadband E quality, even though the international bandwidth capacityENT not at the is M same level. The IRON has many wirecity V EN less hotspots. Taipei City has proTaipei vided a public Wi-Fi access service since 2011. The T S among IT internet accessOCONMEN the citizens is high and theYfiber BIL IAL DA VIR penetration is None of the highest. OR E FF A A US INFRASTRU ICT MATU INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE SO AB RD O FF O VIR EN ICT MATURITYICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY VIR EN E TY ILI E NM TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE T EN M ON AL NT AG BOTTOM LINE US E ECONOMIC AG #14 TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE US ECONOMIC L ONOMIC CIA ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC A ECONOMIC SO FF TY Taipei performs aboveILIaverageSin ICT OC B I DA usage. The computer use#14 high, AL is but OR FF A the penetration for more advanced technologies such as smartphones US AG and tablets is modest. While internet L E TA US #14 use is high, the citizens do not useEN AG NM E O electronic payments to the same extent as in many VIR EN other cities. The city has a well-developed open data L homepage. Another example of theNgovernment use of TA US A ME ICT is the launch ofGE smartphone applications, 16 ON VIR EN ranging from areas ENT city administration to transportalike NM O tion, tourism,ENVIR employment, education, environmental protection, disaster prevention and culture. The aim is to US facilitate the access to, and use of, citizen services and AG SO E ITY CI BIL government information through mobile technology. AL DA ECONOMIC TY ILI AB D OR climate change and pollution, but also on a consistently AL US NT good performanceAGE allYmeasuredEdimensions, while in T NM RO ILI VISOC many other cities perform well either in climate change AB EN IAL RD O or pollution. AFF ECONOMIC ECONOMIC TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE Taipei ranks #14 in the Networked Society City Index and performs quite well in infrastructure and affordability. Taipei does not perform equally well in ICT usage. While personal computer ownership is high, the penetration rate of more advanced technology such as smartphones and tablets is low compared to other Y SO LIT cities with highBIICT performance. The city has a high CIA A RD rate of internet access, very Lhigh fiber penetration and a FO AF high broadband speed. Taipei City Government has initiated a network city program to respond to the global digitalization trend. In 2012, 19.41 million visitors had browsed the home#14 page of Taipei City Government’s global website and 1.95 million visitors had browsed “Taipei E-Services Online.” Citizens are now able to access government servicesENTAL hours a day through 24 US AG M E ON convenient, easy-to-use,IRhigh-speed and obstacleV EN smart network access. #14 The fixed broadband prices are low in SO the city, but the CIAL mobile phone tariffs are not low compared to many other high-ranked cities. The IP transit prices are relatively high compared to Taipei other cities that perform well in ICT. TY ILI AB D OR F AF #15 Sydney Taipei Sydney is the most populous city in Australia and the capital of New South Wales. The population of the greater metropolitan area is above 4.6 million and the residents comprise a cosmopolitan and international population. The city is a high-ranking world city for quality of life. Sydney is a prosperous city and its residents enjoy the world’s second highest earnings (purchasing power parity) among world cities. The largest economic sectors in Sydney include property and business services, retail, manufacturing, and health and community services. Sydney provides approximately 25 percent of the country’s total GDP . Sydney ranks #15 in the Networked Society City Index and does not perform at the expected level considering the size of its economy. The main drawback is its underdeveloped infrastructure when it comes to fixed broadband and the almost non-existing access to fiber Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES  17
  17. 17. US NT ME N IRO NV E N IRO V TY EN SO CIA L R FO AF E ILI B DA AL NT ME AG E TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE T INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY AL ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY CI ECONOMIC As Sydney is considered Ito be a Y LT A for high-ranking world city BI quality of RD FO AF life, it does not come as a surprise #15 ITY SO city performs well inUthe social BIL that the C IAL DA SA OR G dimension of the index. The city Ehas FF A good resultsAfor health and inclusion L US NT M dimension indicates a slight dimensions. AGE educational E The ON VR weakness due to modestI secondary educational attainEN #15 ment, especially in relation to comparable cities. Sydney SO N ME The city performs on a slightly lower L V level in the economic dimension even TA N US EN AG E NM E though Oit is considered as the finanVIR EN cial and economic hub of Australia. TY SO ILI CI AB AL While Sydney has a USAGE relativelyDhigh R FO AF GDP per capita, it does not compare favorably to the highest performing cities. The same is true for the indicator of economic competitiveness where the result is about average for business startups, employment in knowledge intensive services as well as US AG T E in tertiary educational attainment. EN M N IRO ECONOMIC Sydney INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ON VIR EN INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE Sydney #16 Moscow Moscow is the capital of Russia and a major political, economic, cultural and scientific center. With a population of 11.9 million, it is the largest city in Russia. Moscow is one of the most expensive cities of the world and has one of the largest municipal economies in Europe. It accounts for approximately 22 percent of Russia’s GDP . Moscow’s economy is highly diversified. It is the undisputed financial center of Russia and home to the country’s largest banks and companies, including the leading natural gas and oil companies. While remaining one of Russia’s major industrial centers, it has started transferring some industries out of the city to improve its conditions. CIA L #16 US AL TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE INFRASTRUCTURE AF NT AG E E NM O VIR EN ECONOMIC Sydney SO FO A ICT is important for Sydney considering that since the Sydney jobs have moved from manufacturing to 1980s many 18  Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES ITY BIL A RD ECONOMIC ECONOMIC B DA OR FF INFRASTRUCTURE I ICT MATURITY Sydney’s performance in the ICT TY SO ILI CI AB AL affordability dimension is average. RD Sydney FO AF Both fixed and mobile cellular tariffs and the IP transit prices are high in Sydney relation to other well-developed cities in the index. Increased competitiveness in the market could be one way to decrease the prices for ICT services in Sydney. Sydney mostly performs well in the environmental dimension. It is considTY SO ILI CI ered one of the least polluted cities AB AL RD FO and it has a relatively low use of AF NT ME resources. However, there are areas in ON VIR EN need of improvement as the city has the highest carbon dioxide emission out of all the cities and the energy consumption is comparatively high. TY SO ILI C IAL VIR EN The ICT infrastructure in Sydney can be divided in two NMENT with opposite parts US O AG VIR performance Elevels. Mobile broadE N T band is well developed, with LTE N ME technology for Vall N IRO three leading S ITY EN O CI operators. However, the development BIL AL DA R F of fixed broadband is not so advanced, withOlow fiber AF SO penetration. TheCaccess availability to ICT can be ITY IL IAL NT AB ME improved, as indicated by the low number FFORD of Wi-Fi ON A VIR hotspots. EN INFRASTRUCTURE #15 #15 the services and information sectors, which have benefited from well-developed ICT. While on an individual levelAL T US EN AG NM E the ICT usage scores quite highOfor VIR US EN AG Sydney, on technology and market E levels it is average. However, as there US are no clear lows or highs for any of these indicators, AG E there is room for further improvement. ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY AG TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE US INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE L E M ON RIPPLE BOTTOM LINE INE CIA ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC AF L TA EN AG ECONOMIC SO FO US ECONOMIC ITY BIL A RD O VIR EN ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE broadband in particular. However, the National Broadband Network is making efforts to increase fiber rollout ITY across the Sydney metropolitan area. The IP transit SO BIL CIA DA L prices across all networks are high compared to prices OR FF A in similar cities in the index. At the same time, mobile broadband is well developed, with LTE for all three leading operators and mobile broadband speeds, which #15 are the second fastest among all the included cities. The usage of mobile networks is quite good and electronic payments are frequently used. There are some new ICT AL initiatives spurring development such as the Electronic US NT AG ME E Medical Record Programme and Electronic Medication ON VIR EN Management Programme in health care. GE US AG E
  18. 18. INFRASTRUCTURE E #17 São Paulo AG FO A RD AF VIR SO CIA L EN ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE E ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE E L E TA EN M ON São Paulo performs belowY average in LIT #17 the social dimension. DABhas a high It I R FO AF infant mortality rate, which indicates that it is facing challenges inUreaching SA GE L out with healthcare to all its citizens. TA US EN AG M Its educational system is facing similar E ON VIR E challenges and despiteNseveral efforts in the past decade, large disparities in the educational system remain. SO CI AL Sao Paolo The Tcity performs less well in the EN NM economic dimension. With relatively IRO V EN modest GDP per capita and modest scores in economic competitiveness, US AG TY SO the overall performance leaves room E ILI CI AL Moscow ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ITY AG IL NT AB MD RE FO ON IR AF NV FO AF AG #17 ECONOMIC ITY BIL A RD L ECONOMIC Moscow scores high in ICT affordabilSO CI AL ity. Low fixed broadband and mobile phone tariffs together with low IP Moscow transit prices indicate that Muscovites have access to a competitive market Moscow with reasonable prices. CIA US ECONOMIC A A US Moscow scores around average in US AG T EN E terms of ICT infrastructure. While the NM IRO city’s fixed broadband speed is good, NV E T mobile broadband quality score does EN NM not reach the same level. The overall RO VI S ITY EN OC BIL result is also affected by the modest IAL DA R FO score in fiber and high-speed mobile broadband penetraAF T EN SO ONM ITY tion. Weak ICT infrastructure could have negative effects on C BIL IR I DA NV AL E the city’s competitiveness and role as a business center. OR FF SO FF TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC Moscow scores around average in ICT usage, but has a US moderate score inENTAL AG M Moscow ON electronic payments.EWhile Muscovites VIR EN are in many aspects early adopters of US AG new technology, in an international E comparison there is a delay in develMoscow US opment. This could be explained by income disparities AG E and a diverse economic ability of the citizens. TY ILI AB D OR INFRASTRUCTURE E NV N IRO TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE E ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC IAL A ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY MATURITY ICT ICT MATURITY L Moscow is ranked #25 out of the 31 E #16 cities in the environmental dimension. ITY SO TheILoverall result is affected by low CIA AB L TY RD SO I I T FFOscores in recycled waste,L high CO2 CI AB AL EN A #16 RD NM O L FO emissions and highAfossil fuel energy AF VIR US NT EN AG ME consumptionR– Nareas that would benefit E O VI EN from improved city management, increased awareness AL #16 US NT SO ITY and changed behaviors, aided by smart ICTILsolutions. AG C ME B NV ECONOMIC CIA TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE SO FF TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC IRO T ILI AB D OR INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC NT E NM São Paulo ranks ITY in the index. While its performance #17 SO BIL CIA DA L is averageFFcompared to other included cities, it should OR A be noted that in comparison to other developing economies, it is performing very well. In connection with the FIFA World Cup in 2014, the city mayor’s office has launched initiatives#17 improve ICT. For example, there to are plans to install free Wi-Fi access in 120 public spaces, including parks, squares, and public transit L stations. São Paulo has seen Nrapid growth over the past TA US A ME decade, and GE while significant initiatives have been taken ON VIR EN to spur the development, many of the challenges remain. B DA OR F AF Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES  19 NT ME RASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC AL Moscow’sENT status as the economic M E ON centerIRof Russia could be better V EN reflected in its performance in the economic dimension. While the GDP US per capita is relativelyAhigh (much GE higher than the average in Russia), its score in several aspects of economic competitiveness such as business startups, patents and employment in ITY SO BIL CIA US L RD knowledge-intensiveA services leaves room for improveAG FO AF E ment. Tertiary educational attainment is high. Y US São Paulo has the largest economy by GDP among Latin American cities. It is considered the financial capital of Brazil, as it is home to the headquarters of many major corporations and the country’s most renowned banks and financial institutions. Also, 63 percent of all the international companies with business in Brazil have their head offices in São Paulo. The São Paulo Stock Exchange is the largest stock exchange in Latin America. Although the city used to have a strong industrial character, its economy has followed the global trend of shifting to services. INFRASTRUCTURE IAL Moscow scores relativelyTY high in the SO ILI CI AB AL social dimension dueDto the low R FO AF unemployment rate. However, life TY SO ILI CIA expectancy is fairly low and more AB #16 L RD FO than 10 years lower for men than for AF women. Educational attainment could be improved to increase Moscow’s result in the social L TA U dimension. SAGE Despite the low MEN unemployment rate, the #16 ON VIR city’s result in social inclusion is affected by the homiEN Moscow cide rate that is higher than in many other cities. INFRASTRUCTURE OC INFRASTRUCTURE BI DA OR F AF São Paulo is the largest city in Brazil and has a population of about 11 million. The metropolitan area has a population of about 19 million. While São Paulo is not the capital of Brazil, it is the capital of Brazil’s most populous state. It exerts strong regional influence in commerce, finance, arts and entertainment. São Paulo is said to be among the 10 most expensive cities in the world. ICT MATURITY Moscow ranks #16 both in the Networked Society City Index and the TBL Index and its performance in many of NT ME the dimensions is average. Its score in the ICT index is ON IR mainly ENVresult ofTY high score in ICT affordability. a the S LI
  19. 19. AG #18 US AG E ITY SO CIA VIR N L E TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE E ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE L E TA EN M ON ECONOMIC ECONOMIC T IL ENB MDA ON R FO IR F NVA E L US E AG CIA INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE AF AG US SO FO TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE US ITY BIL A RD ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ICT MATURITY As the only sea route between the oil-rich Black Sea and the Mediterranean, the Bosporus has shipping traffic threeS times that of theENTAL Canal. Istanbul is an Suez U AG E increasingly popular touristMdestination and in 2012, it ON VIR EN was the world’s fifth most-visited city. ECONOMIC TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC São Paulo scores around average in ICT usage. The results are consistent AL US NT AG ME in all aspects of ICT E usage andIRreflect ON V EN Sao Paolo both the economy’s and citizens’ ability to adopt new technology as well as the extension of ICT infrastructure and affordability. ECONOMIC ECONOMIC E #18 INFRASTRUCTURE C L INFRASTRUCTURE SO CIA to the focus on high-value-added activities. Yet its low-value-added manufacturing sector is still substantial, and represents four-fifths of the city’s total exports. ICT MATURITY ITY BIL A IAL São Paulo performs especially well in RD FO Y AF SO LIT theBIenvironmental dimension. The CIA DA L OR FF overall result is supported by equally A T good performance in all environmenEN NM #17 tal aspects (climate, pollution and use RO VI EN Y of resources) OC the index. São Paulo S of LIT I #17 AB IA has a high scoreFFORD in recycling wasteL and has relatively A SO low energyI consumption. However, like all ILITY economies AL C B US AL NT DA that are moving upAGE value chain,E theRcity needs to the O NM F AFAL IRO US NT focus on energy consumption Vpatterns and use of EN AG ME E #17 VIRON resources. N A ECONOMIC US for improvement. However, the results are better for AG business startups, indicating potential for E improvement. SO FF TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ECONOMIC TY ILI AB D OR AL Istanbul ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE CI ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE SO ECONOMIC INFRASTRUCTURE Turkey’s ranking in several social T EN areas does not compare favorably to NM AL IRO V other, especially European, cities US NT AG EN ME E ON included in the index. The low life VIR EN U AG expectancy and high Sinfant mortality Y E SO LIT CI A rate indicate that there is roomBIfor AL RD O improvement in healthcare. While the literacyF rate is AF fairly high, Istanbul’s score in educational attainment is modest. The social rifts in Istanbul can be partly explained by immigration from less prosperous parts of NT US Turkey in search of employment and better living ME AG ON E conditions. VIR EN INFRASTRUCTURE São Paulo’s performance in the affordTY SO ILI IAL AB ability dimensionCof the index does not RD FO compare favorably to other cities. While AF Sao Paolo fixed broadband tariffs and transit Sao Paolo prices are reasonable (around average in this study, but higher than in cities in developed countries), the result in ICT affordability is lowered by less competitive prices for mobile phone tariffs. However,Sao market is improving, because broadband the Paolo services are now increasingly offered by both mobile phone operators and cable TV operators. ICT MATURITY Istanbul is ranked #18 in ITY Netthe BIL worked Society City RIndex. Many of #18 DA O its challenges areAFF similar to those of TY SO ILI CIA developing countries rather U than of AB L RD SA FO GE other European countries. Istanbul AF L TA US EN AG M has one Nof Europe’s fastest growing E O VIR populations causing both social and economic strains EN on the city. #18 ICT MATURITY São Paulo scores around average in the ICT infrastructure. While the city’s US AG broadband qualityNisENT E M slightly below RO VI average, the accessEto ICT scores NT EN M fairly well, especially for newer techON VIR EN high-speed mobile nology such as S ITY CI BIL broadband and Ofiber. While the rather modest score on AL DA R FO T usage could beOan indicator of economic inequality,Ya S AF ILI CI AB AL ENT RD M high score in high-speed broadband demonstrates good N FO IRO AF NV preconditionsEfor future development. Istanbul While Istanbul is not the capital of Turkey, it is the country’s economic, cultural and historical center. Istanbul’s population is estimated at 13.9 million, which accounts for 18 percent of the country’s population and makes it the largest city in Turkey and one of the largest in Europe. Istanbul is one of the fastest-growing metropolitan economies in the world. It hosts the headquarters of many companies and accounts for more than a quarter of Turkey’s GDP Its GDP per capita and productivity are . much greater than the national averages, owing in part CI IAL INFRASTRUCTURE #18 Istanbul The city scores below average in all TY IL economic aspects of DtheI index. The AB AL R FO GDP per capita is Fmodest and the A T results in all aspects of economic EN NM competitiveness, especially for RO VI EN knowledge-intensive services, leave room for improvement. The fast growth of Istanbul’s SO ITY population affects the result of the economic dimension. C BIL SO DA OR F AF Istanbul Istanbul scores relatively high in the environmental dimension. The good result is partly explained by the fact that Istanbul has many similarities to developing cities. It has low CO2 emissions and low energy consumption. In terms of further economic development, Istanbul needs to focus on tackling the negative enviIstanbul 20  Ericsson Networked Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES
  20. 20. ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE L M ON VIR EN INFRASTRUCTURE EN INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE E CIA L TA EN SO TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE ITY CI AL ABIL RD FO INFRASTRUCTURE Beijing performs above average in the #19 TY ILI OC social Sdimension. TheDAB infant mortality IAL R FO A rate is low and theF average life AF expectancyTis above average. The US AL US N AG AG E rates ofONME unemployment and homicide E VIR are EN The literacy rate is high, but low. #19 the educational attainment is below average. SO The city scores below average in the AL NT economicEdimension. Despite high AG T M N E ON ME economic growth over an extended VIR ON EN VIR EN period, the city’s performance in U productivity does notSAGE compare favorably to the other cities in theY SO IT CI BIL AL DA index. While the education level among the citizens is OR F AF low, the proportion of employees in the knowledgeintensive service sector is high. The number of patent US applications is below average, SO higher than in many but TY ILI AG CIA AB T E L RD EN other top-performing cities. FO NM Beijing US TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE INFRASTRUCTURE AF O VIR EN INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE ECONOMIC Beijing performs below average in the Beijing environmental dimension.YThe CO2 T SO CI #19 emissions in the city areLIhigh and very BI AL DA OR city’s economic F high compared to Fthe NT A ME ON performance. The energy consumpVIR EN L tion is above average and most of the TA US EN A fossil fuels. The pollution levels are energy comes fromGE NM O VIR TY SO EN above average. The total waste per personLIis lower than I CI AB A RD the averageL among the cities. FO ICT MATURITY AF Beijing Beijing performs below average in ICT usage. Computer use is high, but the tablet penetration is modest. The penetration rate of mobile phones and US AG smartphones is around average. Use E ofBeijing the internet is high, but the penetration of social networking does not compare favorably to many other cities. The use of electronic payments and advanced open data resources are limited. INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE AG E ECONOMIC Beijing ranks #19 in the Networked Society City Index and it performs below average in usage, infrastructure and affordability. The city performs below average in the TBL index as well. Internet access and use of the internet are above average, but the infrastructure penetration of high-speed mobile and fixed broadband TYUS ILI AB RD T FO AF MEN ON VIR ECONOMIC Beijing, the Chinese capital, is also the administrative, cultural and educational center of China. The city of Beijing, which is under direct control of the central government, has a population of about 20 million. Even though Shanghai is a larger city and the financial center of China, most of the largest state-owned companies have their headquarters in Beijing. Beijing has a reputation for hosting many innovative enterprises and small, but fast growing companies. The area of Zhongguancun, in the northwestern part of the city, is a center of electronics and computer related industries. The area of Yizhuang, in the southeast of the city, hosts a center in information technology. The two Chinese universities with the highest international reputation – Beijing University and Tsinghua University – are situated in Beijing. One of the main challenges Beijing faces concerns the quality of air. Even though the government has recognized this and taken a number of actions, air pollution is still a major problem. AG #19 ECONOMIC Istanbul #19 Beijing L ECONOMIC F AF CIA US ECONOMIC TY ILI AB D OR A ECONOMIC Istanbul performs above average in SO IAL ICT affordability,Cwith fairly low tariffs Istanbul for both fixed broadband and mobile phones together with low IP transit prices. This indicates that it has a Istanbul competitive market with affordable prices. SO FF ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC Istanbul’s ICT infrastructure has room T for improvement. ItMhas a moderate EN US ON AG score in broadband quality and a VIR E EN relatively low speed for both fixed and T EN NM mobile broadband. The city has no IRO V ITY E SOC extended fiberN network, which affects BIL IAL DA R F the overall result. A strong ICT infrastructureOis essential AF to increase theSOC city’s T competitiveness and efficiency in TY ILI I L N AB RD the public sectorOANME in order to meet the challenges FO AF VIR mentioned above. EN D OR TY ILI AB ECONOMIC ECONOMIC ECONOMIC Istanbul scores around average in ICT usage. This performance is partly explained by the US rather moderate ENTAL AG E score in the economic dimensionNM O and VIR US EN AG some citizens’ lack of economic E ability to adopt new technologies and, consequently, services such as social networking and US AG E electronic payments. ICT MATURITY ON VIR EN L leave room for improvement. The fixed broadband #19 quality is about average and the mobile broadband speed is slow compared to the other cities in the index. However, the international bandwidth capacity is higher AL than in many other high-performing ICT cities. The US NT AG ME N mobile phoneEtariffs areVIlow and the mobile phone RO EN penetration is about average. ICT MATURITY INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRUCTURE INFRASTRU ICT MATURITY ICT MATU ICT MATURITY #18 ECONOMIC GE CIA TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE CIA ronmental impact, resulting from a Lgrowing population, AL NT increased standards of living andNME challenges related to O VIR the use of resources. Smart ICT solutions in this area EN L US would help to improve the situation.NTA A ME SO A RD FO AF ECONOMIC SO #18 BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TRIPPLE BOTTOM LINE TY ILI AB RD FO AFU SA GE ONOMIC ECONOMIC #18 T EN NM IRO Ericsson Networked NV Society City Index 2013 – APPENDIX 2 – CITY PROFILES  21 E SO CI A TY ILI AB

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