Center for Design Innovation - permaculture presentation

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Jay Dunbar, Eric Jackson – Principles of permaculture design for microfarming and urban sustainability
http://www.centerfordesigninnovation.org/blog/

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Center for Design Innovation - permaculture presentation

  1. 1. What is Permaculture?
  2. 2. What is Permaculture? <ul><ul><li>A regenerative design system that is ecologically enriching and benefiting humans modeled from nature </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Who is Permaculture?
  4. 4. Who is Permaculture?
  5. 5. Who is Permaculture?
  6. 6. Who is Permaculture?
  7. 7. Who is Permaculture?
  8. 8. Who is Permaculture?
  9. 9. Who is Permaculture?
  10. 10. Who is Permaculture?
  11. 11. Who is Permaculture?
  12. 12. a set of design principles
  13. 13. mimicking nature
  14. 14. a contraction of: &quot;permanent agriculture&quot; or &quot;permanent culture&quot;
  15. 15. a cultivated ecology
  16. 16. harnessing the working principles of wildness, evolved over millions of years, ...and letting them work in the garden
  17. 17. less work for greater yield and more pleasure
  18. 18. a practical frame of reference to gardening and working with land
  19. 19. woven together to create a resilient system. a holistic collection of strategic design patterns...
  20. 20. What kind of strategies and patterns?
  21. 21. Observe and Interact A 4-D Process
  22. 22. Observe and Interact Actions/Reactions
  23. 23. Observe and Interact <ul><li>You are a part of a whole system </li></ul>
  24. 24. Observe and Interact <ul><li>the process of observation reveals energy flows and interactions </li></ul>
  25. 25. Catch and Store Energy
  26. 26. Catch and Store Energy <ul><li>Water, sunlight, nutrients </li></ul>
  27. 27. Catch and Store Energy <ul><li>Water, sunlight, nutrients </li></ul><ul><li>tap into natural flows </li></ul>
  28. 28. Catch and Store Energy <ul><li>Water, sunlight, nutrients </li></ul><ul><li>tap into natural flows </li></ul><ul><li>greenhouses and water barrels </li></ul>
  29. 29. Catch and Store Energy <ul><li>Water, sunlight, nutrients </li></ul><ul><li>tap into natural flows </li></ul><ul><li>greenhouses and water barrels </li></ul><ul><li>trees </li></ul>
  30. 30. Obtain a Yield
  31. 31. Obtain a Yield <ul><li>regenerative ecology </li></ul>
  32. 32. Obtain a Yield <ul><li>regenerative ecology </li></ul><ul><li>includes benefits for humans </li></ul>
  33. 33. Obtain a Yield <ul><li>regenerative ecology </li></ul><ul><li>includes benefits for humans </li></ul><ul><li>mulberry </li></ul>
  34. 34. Obtain a Yield <ul><li>regenerative ecology </li></ul><ul><li>includes benefits for humans </li></ul><ul><li>mulberry </li></ul><ul><li>soil - oaks – acorns – pigs – people </li></ul>
  35. 35. Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback
  36. 36. Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback <ul><li>natural cycles / relationships </li></ul>
  37. 37. Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback <ul><li>natural cycles / relationships </li></ul><ul><li>chicken beaks </li></ul>
  38. 38. Apply Self-Regulation and Accept Feedback <ul><li>natural cycles / relationships </li></ul><ul><li>chicken beaks </li></ul><ul><li>microbial relationships vs concentrated nutrients </li></ul>
  39. 39. Use and Value Renewable Resources and Services
  40. 40. Use and Value Renewable Resources and Services <ul><li>re-purposing materials </li></ul>
  41. 41. Use and Value Renewable Resources and Services <ul><li>re-purposing materials </li></ul><ul><li>trees (fruits + nuts, timber, habitat, shade, water and nutrient cycling, pollutant filtering.......)‏ </li></ul>
  42. 42. Use and Value Renewable Resources and Services <ul><li>re-purposing materials </li></ul><ul><li>trees (fruits + nuts, timber, habitat, shade, water and nutrient cycling, pollutant filtering.......)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>livestock (“chicken-ness” “pig-ness”)‏ </li></ul>
  43. 44. Use and Value Renewable Resources and Services <ul><li>re-purposing materials </li></ul><ul><li>trees (fruits + nuts, timber, habitat, shade, water and nutrient cycling, pollutant filtering.......)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>livestock (“chicken-ness” “pig-ness”)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>perennial plants </li></ul>
  44. 45. Use and Value Renewable Resources and Services <ul><li>re-purposing materials </li></ul><ul><li>trees (fruits + nuts, timber, habitat, shade, water and nutrient cycling, pollutant filtering.......)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>livestock (“chicken-ness” “pig-ness”)‏ </li></ul><ul><li>perennial plants </li></ul><ul><li>Carbon Sink (pastures and forests)‏ </li></ul>
  45. 47. Produce No Waste
  46. 48. Produce No Waste <ul><li>The Drain “doesn't exist” in a Permaculture System </li></ul>
  47. 49. Produce No Waste <ul><li>The Drain “doesn't exist” in a Permaculture System </li></ul><ul><li>Re-visioning pests – food missing feeder </li></ul>
  48. 50. Produce No Waste <ul><li>The Drain “doesn't exist” in a Permaculture System </li></ul><ul><li>Re-visioning pests – food missing feeder </li></ul><ul><li>animal by-products, coffee grounds, and cardboard </li></ul>
  49. 51. Design from Patterns to Details
  50. 52. Design from Patterns to Details <ul><li>garden design – herb spiral, keyhole </li></ul>
  51. 53. Design from Patterns to Details <ul><li>Zones </li></ul>
  52. 54. Integrate rather than Segregate
  53. 55. Integrate rather than Segregate <ul><li>Polyculture vs. Monoculture </li></ul>
  54. 56. Integrate rather than Segregate <ul><li>Polyculture: Three Sisters </li></ul>
  55. 57. Integrate rather than Segregate <ul><li>integrating livestock with vegetable production </li></ul>
  56. 58. Integrate rather than Segregate <ul><li>Stacking Functions </li></ul>
  57. 59. Use Small and Slow Solutions
  58. 60. Use Small and Slow Solutions <ul><li>Allows for more feedback and self-regulation </li></ul>
  59. 61. Use Small and Slow Solutions <ul><li>Allows for more feedback and self-regulation </li></ul><ul><li>minimal intervention </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Burden of the Intervener </li></ul></ul>
  60. 62. Use Small and Slow Solutions <ul><li>Allows for more feedback and self-regulation </li></ul><ul><li>minimal intervention </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Burden of the Intervener </li></ul></ul><ul><li>start small and build slowly for a natural progression for more resilient solutions </li></ul>
  61. 63. Use Small and Slow Solutions <ul><li>Allows for more feedback and self-regulation </li></ul><ul><li>minimal intervention </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Burden of the Intervener </li></ul></ul><ul><li>start small and build slowly for a natural progression for more resilient solutions </li></ul><ul><li>tree – leaves – microbes </li></ul>
  62. 64. Use and Value Diversity
  63. 65. Use and Value Diversity <ul><li>nature is a web of interactions that protects from extremes </li></ul>
  64. 66. Use and Value Diversity <ul><li>nature is a web of interactions that protects from extremes </li></ul><ul><li>inputs and outputs matching with different organisms </li></ul>
  65. 67. Use Edges and Value the Marginal
  66. 68. Use Edges and Value the Marginal <ul><li>The interface between things is where the most interesting events take place </li></ul>
  67. 69. Use Edges and Value the Marginal <ul><li>The interface between things is where the most interesting events take place </li></ul><ul><li>forest edge / riparian buffers </li></ul>
  68. 70. Use Edges and Value the Marginal <ul><li>The interface between things is where the most interesting events take place </li></ul><ul><li>forest edge / riparian buffers </li></ul><ul><li>CDI </li></ul>
  69. 71. Use Edges and Value the Marginal <ul><li>The interface between things is where the most interesting events take place </li></ul><ul><li>forest edge / riparian buffers </li></ul><ul><li>CDI </li></ul><ul><li>monoculture has no edges </li></ul>
  70. 72. Creatively Use and Respond to Change
  71. 73. Creatively Use and Respond to Change <ul><li>tree falls in the woods. the forest doesn't weep. </li></ul>
  72. 74. Creatively Use and Respond to Change <ul><li>tree falls in the woods. the forest doesn't weep. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>dynamic response of mycelium and understory plants </li></ul></ul>
  73. 75. Creatively Use and Respond to Change <ul><li>tree falls in the woods. the forest doesn't weep. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>dynamic response of mycelium and understory plants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>light for understory plants </li></ul></ul>
  74. 76. Creatively Use and Respond to Change <ul><li>tree falls in the woods. the forest doesn't weep. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>dynamic response of mycelium and understory plants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>light for understory plants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>microbes decompose tree for soil food </li></ul></ul>
  75. 77. Creatively Use and Respond to Change
  76. 78. Creatively Use and Respond to Change <ul><li>Werehouse Microfarm: finding new ways to grow </li></ul>
  77. 79. Creatively Use and Respond to Change <ul><li>Werehouse Microfarm: finding new ways to grow </li></ul>

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