Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

One-Minute Tips: Thinking Skills

27 views

Published on

Need to learn stuff quickly but no time for a training course or frustrating search on the web? No problem. At ManageTrainLearn, we can help you learn key management skills in no time at all. In a set of spectacular-looking slides, you can get great tips, techniques and ideas in the time it takes to drink a cup of coffee. We call the series, "One-Minute Tips" because we like the name. But, in all truth, you can do them in half this time. And know that your coffee break hasn't been wasted. What's more, as a new subscriber to ManageTrainLearn, you can download this full slide for no price at all. That's right. FREE!. Visit us now at www.managetrainlearn.com and download this PowerPoint with our compliments.

We Make PowerPoint FUN Again!
Fantastic Content!
Unbeatable Slides!
Never-To-Be-Forgotten Learning Experiences!

Hi, we're Manage Train Learn. One of the oldest and most successful e-learning companies in the world with thousands of delighted users. What do we do? We help you become outstanding managers, trainers, and learners. How do we do that? Through the power of the most-widely-used e-learning product on the planet: PowerPoint. Discover things you didn't know PowerPoint could do with over 1000 management and personal development presentations. It's a simple success story. PowerPoint. Us. And you. You've got it, used it, and watched it. Now, learn and succeed with it!

Published in: Self Improvement
  • Be the first to comment

One-Minute Tips: Thinking Skills

  1. 1. 1| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn ONE-MINUTE TIPS Thinking Skills Learn the Skills of Brainworking – In Less Than an Hour!
  2. 2. 2| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn One-Minute Tips from Manage Train Learn Attribution: All images are from sources which do not require attribution and may be used for commercial uses. Sources include pixabay, unsplash, and freepik. These images may also be those which are in the public domain, out of copyright, for fair use, or allowed under a Creative Commons license. The One-Minute Tips series from Manage Train Learn and Slide Topics is a collection of tips and techniques that will help you as a learner or trainer to quickly pick up ideas on how to become skilful at everyday workplace situations. The written content in this Slide Topic belongs exclusively to Manage Train Learn and may only be reprinted either by agreed attribution to Manage Train Learn or with the express written permission of Manage Train Learn. They are designed as a series of numbered slides on an attractive design background. As with all programmes on Slide Topics, these slides are fully editable and can be used in your own programmes, royalty-free. Your only limitation is that you may not re-publish or sell these slides as your own. Copyright Manage Train Learn 2020 onwards.
  3. 3. 3| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn ARE YOU READY? OK, LET’S START!
  4. 4. 4| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Few of us spend much time developing our thinking skills. We believe that thinking is a natural function that can't be improved or that the great thinkers among us are more gifted than we are. Nothing could be further from the truth. All research shows that we each possess a hugely powerful brain whose ability lies vastly underused. #1.UseYourBraintotheFull
  5. 5. 5| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips In industrialised countries, thinking was until recently regarded as a second-class skill. People were employed first for their manual skill. All that has changed. With the information age, brain has overtaken brawn. The modern and future worker needs hand, eye, and brain. #2.SeeYourBrainasaKeyResource
  6. 6. 6| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Today's worker is less a manual worker and more a knowledge worker. For example, steel makers don't so much make the steel as manage the information that makes the steel. David Potter of Psion says that the vital competence for future organisations is the ability to use thinking skills to develop information even further. #3.BeaKnowledgeWorker
  7. 7. 7| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Mike Pedler and Tom Boydell discovered that half the key skills a manager needs today are thinking skills. They include analytical, problem- solving, decision-making and judgment-forming skills; command of basic facts; creativity; professional understanding; mental agility. #4.UseYourBrainstoManage
  8. 8. 8| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Thomas Stewart says that, in an age of information, organisations have more wealth in their employees' brains than they do at the bank. Thomas Watson of IBM liked to say that he would rather his factories burned to the ground than lose the knowledge inside his workers' heads. Stewart calls this knowledge the intellectual capital of a business. #5.MeasureYourRealWealth
  9. 9. 9| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Because thinking comes naturally to all of us, few of us bother to train our minds to think. The result is a jumble of confused, disjointed and reactive thoughts. They don't have to be. Through training our thoughts to be focused and positive, we can change the quality of our thinking and the quality of the results. #6.TrainYourThoughts
  10. 10. 10| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips If you were to take a soil sample of someone's thoughts, it's likely that they would consist of a jumble of confused thoughts going nowhere. Included in the mix will be fantasising thoughts, negative thoughts, worries, fears, and wishful thinking. Like other compulsive thoughts, these thoughts take us nowhere except round and round. #7.WeedOutNegativeThinking
  11. 11. 11| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips The human brain connects to a huge number of sensory nerves, including 500,000 touch detectors, 200,000 temperature sensors and 4 million pain sensors. With this amount of information pouring into our brains, it's no wonder that our minds wander, we lose the thread and end up in places we hadn't intended to go. #8.ValueYourBrain’sPotential
  12. 12. 12| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Some people have a tendency to swing from positive moods to negative moods in a short space of time. It's what is known as "yo-yo thinking": one minute up, the next minute down. Yo-yo thinking is caused by an over-reaction to what is happening around us whereas in truth things are rarely as good or as bad as we think. #9.AvoidYo-YoThinking
  13. 13. 13| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips The best way to counter fearful and doubting thoughts is to anchor our thinking in the present. We can do this by asking what thoughts will help us achieve what we want right now. A similar technique is free- flow thinking which lets go of all past and future thoughts and opens our minds to present moment awareness. #10.BeAwareinthePresent
  14. 14. 14| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Negative thinking has been shown to make brain cells shrivel and die whereas positive thinking can make them grow. Experiments into the effect of humour on the brain show that the more we laugh and feel happy, the more creative we become. The answer to "Can you play football like Beckham?" is not "No", but "Not yet". #11.NegativeThinking
  15. 15. 15| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips For much of the 20th century, people thought the brain was a trial and error mechanism. If we made a mistake, we needed to instruct it to do better the next time. We now know differently. The brain is a success mechanism. It actually seeks out successful solutions to the positive goals we set it. #12.YourSuccessMechanism
  16. 16. 16| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Some people look upon memory as the Rosetta Stone of the brain: the key that unlocks its workings. Every civilization ponders the mystery of memory. The Greeks saw it in terms of a wax inscription. Medieval man portrayed it as a system of hydraulics. In the 17th century, it became a clockwork mechanism. And in our times, a computer. What is certain is that the memory is phenomenal. And despite what we think, improveable. #13.TheHistoryofMemory
  17. 17. 17| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Our ability to recall something is heightened by sense associations. Frank Staub proved that wafting chocolate aroma over a class of students helped them improve their recollection of facts when he repeated it weeks later. This is why people can remember the sights, sounds, smells and tastes of childhood vividly. #14.SenseAssociations
  18. 18. 18| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips When you need to remember something important, put down a striking landmark. Some of the best landmarks are those that are funny, sexy, unexpected, frightening, unusual, silly or embarrassing. That's why we remember our first day at school (frightening), our first kiss (sexy), and our first day in a new job (exciting). #15.Landmarks
  19. 19. 19| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips A peg system is a great way to remember a number sequence. The peg is a rhyming hook on which we hang the number. So to remember the sequence 3621, we might associate the number 3 with knee, 6 with sticks, 2 with glue and 1 with gun. From this we can devise a silly story that will stick in our mind eg "After hurting my knee, I used walking sticks joined by glue that doubled as a gun." #16.ThePegSystem
  20. 20. 20| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Here are 3 ways to recall information using sounds: Rhymes as in the ditty: "In 14 hundred and 82, Columbus sailed the ocean blue"; Mnemonics such as the months of the year: "30 days have September..."; Silly word associations for remembering people's names, so Lazenby could "laze on the bay" and Pakenham could "pack 'em in". #17.Rhymes,Mnemonics,andSillySayings
  21. 21. 21| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Every time we use a brain cell, the coating of myelin around it gets thicker. This helps us find the brain cell more quickly next time. That's why regular review of information helps us retain it. Review techniques include: re-telling the event; re-visiting the location; and re-playing it in our mind's eye. #18.ReviewandYourBrainCells
  22. 22. 22| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips No two people ever see the external world in exactly the same way. What we think we see is distorted by our expectations, our habits, our assumptions and our viewpoints. As Penelope Fitzgerald says: "A thing is not what we think it is, but a think". #19.OurViewoftheWorld
  23. 23. 23| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Try this experiment. Write down the Scottish surnames Macdonald, Macpherson, and Macdougall and ask someone to pronounce them. Now follow these with the word Machinery and people are likely to mis-pronounce it. This is because we tend to think in habitual ways and don't like what doesn't fit. #20.HabitualThinking
  24. 24. 24| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips There is a poem called The Blind Man and the Elephant by John Godfrey Saxe in which six blind men each touch an elephant and have to say what it is. #21.ADifferentPointofView Naturally, because one touches the ears, another the trunk, and another the tusks, they come to completely different answers. That's because what we see depends on where we see it from.
  25. 25. 25| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips As we grow up and refine our view of the world, the connections in our brain get fewer and fewer. As an adult we have half the number of connections we had when we were two. It's like a sculptor who starts off with a large block and gradually chips away at it to create the shape he needs. #22.LimitingOurBrainConnections
  26. 26. 26| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Many of the assumptions we make about others are based on fixed thinking patterns. In one university experiment, a stranger was introduced to two classes, one as a student and the other as a professor. Later the classes were asked to guess his height. Those told he was a student believed his height to be 6" less than those told he was a professor. #23.HowAssumptionsConfuseOurBrains
  27. 27. 27| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Everything we know, feel and do is first modelled in our brains. Our brains are the source of our imaginations, our willpower and the concept of who we are. The human brain is the source of our potential. If we want to maximise all we are capable of being, we can do no better than maximise the 3lb universe inside our skulls. #24.ThoughtsComeFirst
  28. 28. 28| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Our knowledge of the brain's potential is very recent. The Greeks thought that thinking came from the heart. Renaissance man thought that the mind was somewhere outside the brain. In the 1930's the brain was just believed to be a storage organ like a computer. Only since we have begun to study the workings of the brain, do we realise how amazing it really is. #25.OurChangingKnowledgeoftheBrain
  29. 29. 29| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips The facts about the human brain are astounding. The brain's energy could light a 20-watt bulb continuously. The number of nerve cells in one brain is twice the number of people on earth. There are more cell connections in the brain than stars in our galaxy. the brain can process 30 billion bits of information every second. #26.ThePoweroftheBrain
  30. 30. 30| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Paul McLean has demonstrated that the human brain is really 3 separate evolutionary brains: the reptilian brain which is over 250 million years old and responsible for our instinctive actions. It is located in the medulla-limbic area.; the mammalian brain that is the seat of our emotions; the thinking brain in the cerebral cortex which is just 40,000 years old. #27.OurEvolutionaryBrains
  31. 31. 31| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips The left side of the brain is the seat of logic, speech, and analysis. The right side of the brain is the seat of symbol, imagination and abstract thought. We use the 2 hemispheres together when we imagine a goal and then take the steps to get there. Like President Kennedy declaring the dream of a moon landing and then setting in train how it was to happen. #28.CranialHemispheres
  32. 32. 32| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips The human brain has 4 super functions. Thinking: we are unique in being able to think about thinking. Storing: we can store everything that has ever happened to us. Behaviour: we can automate much of what we do to happen without our conscious thought. Applications: we can use our brains to be creative and change the way we live. #29.TheFourSuper-FunctionsoftheBrain
  33. 33. 33| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Brain Nearly all of the power of the human brain lies deep in the subconscious. The conscious brain can only retain about 7 items at any one time. Write out a list of shopping items and try to remember it exactly when you get to the shop. But when you access the rich store in your subconscious, anything is possible. #30.TheLimitsoftheConscious
  34. 34. 34| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips There are 5 ways to access the amazing power of your subconscious brain: intuition or gut feel: this is your subconscious talking; meditation: which puts your brain into a waking theta state; self-awareness: observing yourself from outside yourself; soft focus: which turns off the conscious thinking process; light-heartedness: which frees us from habitual patterns and seriousness. #31.TuningIntotheSub-Conscious
  35. 35. 35| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips There are 3 amazing features of the subconscious brain. First, the self- image. Whatever image of yourself you present to your brain is the person you will become. Secondly, the problem-solver. Give your brain a problem, and it will try to resolve it by itself. Thirdly, drive and energy. The subconscious has a momentum all of its own. It wants you to achieve your goals and will take you there if you will let it. #32.FeaturesoftheSub-ConsciousBrain
  36. 36. 36| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Brainstorming is a great technique for creating a huge quantity of ideas in the shortest possible time. It does, however, rely on people letting themselves run riot with ideas and not feel that they and the idea are being judged. In a brainstorming group, pick the fastest writer to record all the ideas. #33.Brainstorming
  37. 37. 37| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Sparking is the basic technique of brainstorming. It's a bit like an electric spark that sets fire to something else. So one idea sets off another. And another. And another. Until you have a flood. That's why everyone in the group should not prepare their thoughts but listen to each other and come up with ideas spontaneously. #34.Sparking
  38. 38. 38| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips A brainstorming technique that can spark off more ideas is Paradoxical Intention. This means getting the group to think of ideas to make a problem worse, as in: what could we do to lose more orders? Although it sounds obtuse, some of the answers can, paradoxically, contain the germ of great solutions. #35.ParadoxicalIntention
  39. 39. 39| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Another technique that a brainstorming group can use to re- start the flow of ideas is Seeding. You simply choose a word at random and see what associations it has with the problem your group is looking at. A group looking at its excessive amount of paperwork chose "breakfast" and came up with a once-a-week breakfast-time meeting to clear their paperwork. #36.Seeding
  40. 40. 40| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips One clever technique of brainstorming is Wording. Simply write down the problem you're looking at, eg "How do we reduce our paperwork?" and then brainstorm ideas around each of the words, starting with "How", then "do", next "we" and ending with "paperwork". This gets the group going again on new lines of creative thinking. #37.Wording
  41. 41. 41| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Most of our organisations are run on rational lines. After all, management is a logical function that tries to predict and plan with certainty. Yet, in today's organisations, that's no longer enough. When beset by competition and change, organisations have to come up with ideas that are better than "this is the way we've always done it". They need creative thinking. #38.CreativeThinking
  42. 42. 42| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips As adults we tend to think in a conditioned way aimed at showing how clever we are. Yet, as children, we were simply spontaneous and far more creative in our thinking. To re-capture your childhood curiosity, allow yourself to just wonder at things, to be completely present in the here and now, and to detach yourself from what you thought was real. #39.BeingKidsAgain
  43. 43. 43| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips To be innovative doesn't require a university degree; it simply requires making a connection between old ideas. For instance, did you know that ice cream was invented in 2000 BC yet it took another 3900 years for someone to come up with the idea of a cone? It's when you take two seemingly unrelated items and use the spark of creativity that genius happens. #40.FindingConnections
  44. 44. 44| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips It is a peculiarly Western trait to want to tie things up in neat bundles. We prefer solutions to problems, and answers to questions. To be creative, you need to be comfortable with things that don't fit. The Eastern tradition is more in tune with incongruence. As in this Zen koan, or problem: what is the sound of one hand clapping? #41.IncongruenceandCreativity
  45. 45. 45| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Tom Peters says that the creativity of a workplace can be measured by a laughometer, ie how much it laughs. Humour is one of the greatest creative devices. It jolts us out of our normal patterns and puts ideas together that shouldn't go together. It has been found that when students listen to comedy tapes, their ability to solve problems rises by 60%. #42.CreativityandHumour
  46. 46. 46| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Many of the products we take for granted today are the result of people thinking outside their limits. John Lynn recalls attending a computer conference in the 1980's at a hotel when someone joked that the next thing they'd be thinking of would be computerised doors. When he went back to the same hotel 20 years later, all the doors used computer-programmed key cards. #43.ThinkingOutsidetheLimits
  47. 47. 47| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips To be creative doesn't require blue- sky thinking. You can still be creative by adapting what works elsewhere. An American airline that wanted quicker turnarounds on their flights adopted the techniques of Formula One pit crews. Another source of ideas is nature. Georges de Mestral adapted the way certain seeds stick to clothing and invented Velcro. #44.AdaptingWhatWorks
  48. 48. 48| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Dreaming and day-dreaming can create a rich seam of ideas, because that's when we relax and let the subconscious mind work by itself. The Roffey Park Management Institute calls this "washing-up creativity" because most flashes of inspiration come when we are walking the dog, sitting Archimedes-like in the bath, or doing the washing up. #45.Dreaming
  49. 49. 49| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Studies show that the average person takes 612 decisions a day. That's 223,380 a year. Strategic thinking is about how each of those decisions affect your tomorrows. When your decisions are in alignment with what's important to you, then life becomes meaningful and productive. #46.StrategyandToday’sDecisions
  50. 50. 50| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips There are 5 don'ts in decision- taking. Don't make a decision unless you have 2 equally valid options. Don’t make a decision if it's someone else's responsibility. Don't make a decision unless there's disagreement. Don't make a decision until you have to. Don't make a decision unless you can act on it at once. #47.FiveDon’tsinDecisions
  51. 51. 51| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips The best decisions are hot-iron decisions, taken when the iron is hot and the time just right. Too much thinking about the decision may miss the moment for action. Too much action may be at the expense of thought. Aim to balance thought and action: look before you leap and leap before you look. #48.Hot-IronDecisions
  52. 52. 52| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips In the thinking stage of decision- taking, you need to collect, sift and analyse the relevant data. This can include not just the facts, but how you feel about what to do. There are a number of models that can help you organise the data, such as: the Rainbow Model, NOISICED (decision backwards) and the Six Thinking Hats of Edward de Bono. #49.Decision-takingModels
  53. 53. 53| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Most of us face a decision when we have just two choices and can't decide which to make. One way is to list the pros and cons of each option and see which is the best. Another way is to toss a coin. Einstein used this method but would always see how the coin fell and then ask himself how he felt about the result. If he felt good, he would go with it; if not, he would ignore it. #50.Either-Or
  54. 54. 54| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Many of the biggest business decisions ever taken were taken on instinct. Not on a whim, but on a sense of what feels right. Some people can sense a right decision in their gut, some in their heart. It just feels right or not. That's why you should take the big decisions with your heart and the little ones with your head. #51.GutFeel
  55. 55. 55| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Some decisions can be made on the hoof, as we go, as long as we are prepared to learn from wrong decisions and go back. This is a much better choice than making no decision at all. Particularly in business. As Tom Watson says: "Doing nothing is a comfortable alternative because it is without risk, but it is an absolutely fatal way to do business." #52.DecisionsOntheHoof
  56. 56. 56| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Most people respond to a problem in one of 3 ways. They get afraid and wish it would go away. They feel they have to come up with an immediate answer. They look for someone to blame. In Chinese, the symbol for a crisis is the same as that for crossroads. The goal of problem-solving is to make us competent to handle that crisis. #53.AProblemisanOpportunitynotaCrisis
  57. 57. 57| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips The classical approach to problem- solving uses both left-brain and right-brain thinking. We break the problem down with the left and get possible solutions with the right. The steps are: define the problem; define the solution; advance possible solutions; test them; select the best fit. #54.TheClassicalApproach
  58. 58. 58| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Tom Hicks of Connexus says that people are born problem-solvers but don't realise it. It is our fear of conflict and our fear of failure #55.TheBendintheRoad that makes us uncomfortable with problems. Hicks says a problem is like a bend in the road where we can't see ahead. Take the bend fast and you'll crash. Slow down and you'll make it.
  59. 59. 59| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Carl Jung said that we sometimes go looking for problems where none exist. When a new situation arises that you think is a problem, first ask yourself: is this a problem or just an unexpected situation?; Is this a problem or an opportunity to learn?; Is this a problem or do I need to change the way I do something? Change your point of view and you change the problem. #56.IsItReallyaProblem?
  60. 60. 60| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips The value of using a group to problem-solve is that a group can come up with more ideas than one person on their own. Douglas McGregor has defined the features of an effective problem-solving group: an informal atmosphere; active listening; frank criticism of ideas; responsibility for action; openness about feelings. #57.UsingtheGroup
  61. 61. 61| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips A problem can sometimes seem hard to crack because of the way we word it. Change the words and you change the problem. For example, when asked for a "new door design", engineers will change the handle and hinges. But when you ask them for a "new entrance way", all manner of chutes, slides, and openings become possible. #58.ChangetheProblem
  62. 62. 62| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips When looking at quality defects, the Japanese use a technique called the 5 Whys? They ask 5 Why questions in a row to get to the heart of the problem. Reducing a problem to its bare essentials like this is known as Occam's razor after a method used by William of Occam in the 14th century. #59.TheFiveWhys
  63. 63. 63| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips An innovation is the application of an old idea in new ways. Innovation is an absolute pre-requisite for survival in today's workplaces. Not just in terms of new products, but in solving intractable problems and finding new inventive ways to market, organise and use all the resources available. #60.WhatIsInnovation?
  64. 64. 64| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Goran Ekvall has defined three conditions needed for a climate of creativity. These are: trust, dynamism, and humour. When studying why the women's section of a Swedish newspaper always outperformed their colleagues, Ekval found they had a creative sense of humour which the others didn't have. #61.AClimateofCreativity
  65. 65. 65| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips According to the Roffey Park Management Institute, most flashes of inspiration come to people when they are not actively thinking, such as when shaving or washing the dishes. It was the same for Isaac Newton when an apple fell on his head in the garden. And for Archimedes it was in his bath. #62.FlashesofInspiration
  66. 66. 66| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips As well as pure invention, we can make innovations by putting two things together in a new way. Akio Morita, chairman of Sony, said that he asked his team to create a tape recorder he could go on walks with. The team put together a transistor radio and a tape recorder and came up with the Walkman. #63.NewConnections
  67. 67. 67| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips The method of adapting what our situation is like and adapting it to our needs is called "metaphorical analysis". It's what watchmakers Swatch did when they turned their watches into fashion accessory items. And what an American airline did when it copied the methods of Formula One pit-stop crews to turn their aircraft round quicker. #64.MetaphoricalAnalysis
  68. 68. 68| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips Once a new idea has been adopted and found to work, it stops being new and becomes part of the way we see things. The history of the world is the history of innovation and acceptance. Thomas Kuhn called this a paradigm shift: a complete break with the past, that once shifts never goes back. #65.ParadigmShifts
  69. 69. 69| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn ARE YOU READY? OK, LET’S START! THAT’S IT! WELL DONE!
  70. 70. 70| Thinking SkillsOne-Minute TipsManage Train Learn Thinking SkillsOne-Minute Tips THANK YOU This has been a Slide Topic from Manage Train Learn

×