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Culture

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What's It Like Where You Work? Preview of full presentation from Slide Topics. Part of the Slide Topics Professional Development Programme.

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Culture

  1. 1. 1| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture CULTURE What’s it like where you work? Slide Topics: The Professional Development Programme
  2. 2. 2| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture 1 2 3 5 6 7 4 8 Attribution: All images are from sources where a Creative Commons license exists for commercial use. All icons are on subscription from thenounproject. All clipart is from free sources. Flickr attribution for cover pic: Worksheet and Key Points Complete the worksheet and review the topic. Culture Introduction: The culture of an organization is often defined as: “the way we do things round here”. If you, as manager or leader, want to ensure that the way you operate reflects what you want customers to experience, then you should manage the 7 hidden signals of your business culture. Rites and Rituals Respect me because I have more power than you Symbols and Slogans Culture is reflected in what we see and hear Layout and Signals Our surroundings give us away Climate and Atmosphere Look around at any organisation and sense what matters Language and Jargon Culture shows in the words people use everyday Role Models Know what matters by who is admired Stories and Myths To know a culture, find out what is rewarded /tonythemisfit/4099700944/
  3. 3. 3| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture What is Culture? Culture is sometimes used in a literal sense to mean the way an organisation's growth and development is ensured. In a looser sense, it is often used to mean, "the way we do things round here". As far as visitors and customers are concerned, an organisation's culture is all the moments of truth added together. 1 Definition 1 Trice and Beyer define organisational culture as: "...the system of publicly and collectively accepted meanings operating for a given group at a given time." 3 Definition 3 AuxilliumWest define culture as: "...the moral, social, and behavioural norms of an organisation based on the beliefs, attitudes, and priorities of its members." 2 Definition 2 John Hunt defines it as: "...the collective of shared values, ideologies and beliefs of members of an organisation." What is Culture?
  4. 4. 4| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture 1. RITES AND RITUALS Rites and ceremonies are important events in the life of an organisation. They re-state in subtle ways the things that matter, even though their immediate commercial or practical benefits may be limited. Some of the rituals include the annual pay round (subtly reminding people of the powers of management) and the annual conference (subtly reminding employees of the importance of working together). Picture: one of the traditional cultural rituals at work is the unwritten acceptance that the boss expects respect from those further down the line. Respect me because I have more power than you Flickr attribution: /heinihelmi/18500760063/
  5. 5. 5| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture How Culture Develops Rites and rituals are often started by the original founders and leaders of the organisation. Although their original purpose may be long gone, they continue because they are a link to the roots of the organisation. This is how the culture then develops. "Culture isn't "it"; it's "us"." (Jim Clemmer and Art McNeil) The original founding fathers define what matters - beliefs, rituals, priorities, assumptions. These are shared and developed as the organisation grows. They are inculcated into new starters. They are reinforced and re-interpreted by successive managers. Those who cannot accept them leave; those who try to change them and fail, leave. Eventually the rational systems and policies dominate while the culture goes underground. 1 2 43 5 6
  6. 6. 6| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture 2. SYMBOLS AND SLOGANS Symbols and slogans are the signs of an organisation's culture. They have a huge impact on how an organisation is seen and sees itself. When British Telecom changed its name to BT and spent £2 million on a new logo, people condemned it as a waste of money. What these symbols did, however, was to update BT's culture into that of a modern technology-aware organisation. The old-style British phone box was designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott to commemorate King GeorgeV's Silver Jubilee. In the Diamond Jubilee year of 2012, some of the boxes were creatively transformed to raise money for charity including the one here. Culture is reflected in what we see and hear Flickr attribution: /karen_roe/7495682160/
  7. 7. 7| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture 10 Examples of Company Slogans 1 “Opening a New Page in Your Life” (White Wing Bookstores) 2 “Producing Sounds, Creating Feelings” (Community Loudspeakers) 3 “I Feel Great, But I’m Not” (Boca Diet Clinic) 4 “Come In As Guests, Leave As Family” (Main Hotels) 10 ”Experience the Power of Change” (Robert and Stern, Architects) SLOGANS 5 “Light Is Faster, But We Are Safer” (Global Jet Airlines) 9 “Invest Your Present In a Safe Future” (GSA Insurance) 8 “A Virtual World of Live Pictures” (Kodak) 7 “Tastes to Share, Moments to Remember” (Blue Mountain Tea) 6 “Serving the Sweetest Customers” (Candy Store Chain) Here are 10 examples of the slogans used by companies that reflect their values and culture.
  8. 8. 8| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture 3. LAYOUT AND SIGNALS What people see every day in their workplace, for example in the layout and design of offices, reveals the culture of an organisation. In Japanese offices, for example, private rooms are a rarity; people of whatever rank work close together. In Western companies, offices are laid out according to rank with bigger furniture according to status. In IBM, every office has a flipchart, thus making the point that the office is a meeting place, a place for discussion and a place for creative ideas. Picture: you can often get a sense of an organisation’s culture the minute you walk into the reception. Our surroundings give us away Flickr attribution: /wittistanbulsuites/3440791711/
  9. 9. 9| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture Signals Signals that can send positive messages: Leaving people to work on their own = we trust you. Asking staff what they think = you're the real experts. Visiting customers regularly = we exist for you. Recognizing small acts of excellence = Thanks, let's have more. Signals that can send negative messages: Executive car parks = we count, you don't. Ignoring colleagues = I'm more important than you. Discipline = I'm more powerful than you. Slow response to customers = we don't care. Culture is present everywhere you look in an organisation, sometimes sending the signals you want to send, sometimes not. What does this signal mean? Flickr attribution: /budgetplaces/6388528551/ What does this signal mean? Flickr attribution: /budgetplaces/6388544285/
  10. 10. 10| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture Thanks for viewing this preview slide. Visit Slide Topics for a FREE copy and download the full version in PowerPoint and/or pdf. www.slidetopics.com
  11. 11. 11| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture Slide Topics
  12. 12. 12| Slide Topics: The Professional Development ProgrammeCulture Copyright KSA Training Ltd. All rights reserved. Slide Topics is a registered trademark of KSA Training Ltd at www.slidetopics.com Slide Topics Just a great way to learn

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