Xeriscape Gardening - Oklahoma State University

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Xeriscape Gardening - Oklahoma State University

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Xeriscape Gardening - Oklahoma State University

  1. 1. Xeriscape GardeningDepartment of Horticulture & Landscape ArchitectureOklahoma Cooperative Extension Service
  2. 2. Xeriscape History• Denver water department - 1978• Reduce irrigation• Based on sound horticultural principles• Also known as water-wise , water TM efficient, watersaver
  3. 3. Xeriscape - What is it?• Xeri - scape• Pronounced “zeri-scape” – xeri = dry – scape = vista• Quality landscaping that conserves water and protects the environment.
  4. 4. Misconception #1:• Xeriscape means rocks and yucca, or cactus and gravel
  5. 5. Misconception #2:• Xeriscape means no lawns.
  6. 6. Misconception #3:• Xeriscape means dry landscaping only.
  7. 7. Seven fundamentals1. Plan and design2. Consider improving the soil3. Use appropriate plants and zone the landscape4. Create practical turf areas5. Consider using mulches6. Irrigate efficiently7. Maintain the landscape appropriately
  8. 8. Plan & Design• Begin with a well- thought-out design
  9. 9. Plan & Design• Start with a site analysis . . . – Assess factors that influence water as well as good or bad views
  10. 10. Plan & Design• . . . and inventory – Existing structures, trees, shrubs, and turf areas, etc.
  11. 11. Plan & Design • Consider- – Budget, – Appearance, – Function, – Maintenance, – Water needs
  12. 12. Plan & Design• Refer to local resources
  13. 13. Plan & Design
  14. 14. Plan & Design
  15. 15. Plan & Design• Hard surfaces and the use of heat barriers – Shade – Organic materials – Fences or hedges – Control air movement
  16. 16. Improve Soil• Add organic matter to soil of shrub and flower beds – Improves plant health & conserves water • By absorbing and storing water in a form available to plants• Till in 4 inches of organic material• Not practical for trees and grass areas
  17. 17. Use Appropriate Plants and Zone Landscape• Use native plants when possible• Well-adapted exotic plants may also be used• Drought tolerant does not mean “plant and forget”
  18. 18. Use Appropriate Plants and Zone Landscape • Low water use zones • Moderate water use zones • High water use zones
  19. 19. Create Practical Turf Areas• Turf areas should be based on life style, site conditions, and water needs• Traditional turf areas require more water
  20. 20. Create Practical Turf Areas• Turfgrasses vary in their need for irrigation – Fescue, bluegrass, ryegrass (use the most water) – Hybrid bermudas like Tifway – Zoysiagrass – Common bermudagrass, U-3 – Buffalograss (uses the least water)
  21. 21. Create Practical Turf Areas• Consider: – Reducing the size of water-sensitive lawns through the use of patios, decks, shrub beds and groundcovers – The ease or difficulty of watering the proposed area • Long narrow and small odd-shaped areas are difficult to irrigate efficiently
  22. 22. Use MulchesMulch• Conserves soil moisture• Reduces weeds• Prevents soil compaction• Moderates soil temperatures
  23. 23. Use Mulches
  24. 24. Use Mulches• Organic – Straw, pine needles, bark nuggets, wood chips, sawdust and other wood products• Inorganic – Lava rock, rock, plastic, landscape fabric
  25. 25. Irrigate Efficiently• Efficient irrigation systems can save a lot of water• Efficient systems include – Soaker hoses, trickle, drip• Overhead irrigation is inefficient• Zone irrigation systems
  26. 26. Irrigate Efficiently• Determine how much water is needed and how often each watering zone needs watering.• Determine how long to water.• Determine how fast to water.
  27. 27. Maintain Landscape Properly• Healthy plants are more drought tolerant than weak or damaged plants
  28. 28. Maintain Landscape Properly• Proper mowing• Proper fertilizing• Proper pruning• Properly timed pest control• Avoid mechanical damage• Periodic checks of irrigation system
  29. 29. Low Water Use Plants• Large trees – Caddo sugar maple – Hackberry – Ginkgo – Kentucky coffeetree – Oaks – Bald cypress – Lacebark elm – Japanese zelkova
  30. 30. Low Water Use Plants• Medium trees – Arizona cypress – Eastern red cedar – Chinese pistache – Western soapberry – Cedar elm
  31. 31. Low Water Use Plants• Small trees – Shantung maple – Oklahoma redbud – Desert willow – Winterberry euonymus – Pinyon pine
  32. 32. Low Water Use Plants• Shrubs - small • Shrubs - medium – Glossy abelia – Rose of Sharon – Deciduous holly – Crape myrtle – Winter jasmine – Shrub roses – Junipers – Sumac – Nandina – Spirea
  33. 33. Low Water Use Plants• Shrubs - large – Smoke tree – Crape myrtle – Silverberry elaeagnus – Yaupon holly – Arborvitae – Vitex
  34. 34. Low Water Use Plants• Vines – Crossvine – Trumpet vine – Silver lace vine – English ivy – Virginia creeper – Boston ivy – Climbing rose
  35. 35. Low Water Use Plants• Groundcovers • Ornamental grasses – Hardy ice plant – Pampas grass – Junipers – Plume grass – Liriope – Maiden grass – Creeping phlox – Japanese silver grass – Stonecrop sedum – Zebra grass – santolina – Giant reed grass – Switch grass – Fountain grass
  36. 36. Low Water Use Plants• Perennials – Yarrow – Gaillardia – Wormwood – Gaura – Blue mist spirea – Daylily – Plumbago – Bearded iris – Shasta daisy – Russian sage – Coreopsis – Black-eyed Susan – Coneflower – Autumn sage – Verbena
  37. 37. Low Water Use Plants• Annuals – Joseph’s coat – Summer snapdragon – Melampodium – Cockscomb – Cosmos – Mexican heather – Gazania – Gomphrena
  38. 38. – Firebush– Madagascar periwinkle– Sunflower– Ornamental sweet potato– Lantana– Pentas– Portulaca/purslane
  39. 39. Low Water Use Plants• Annuals – Mexican bush sage – Dusty miller – Purple heart – Marigolds – Mexican sunflower – Zinnia – Mexican zinnia

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