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The canterbury tales(inc)

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The Canterbury Tales By Geoffrey Chaucer, It is an Incomplete version

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The canterbury tales(inc)

  1. 1. GEOFFREY CHAUCER
  2. 2. -(; c. 1343 – 25 October 1400), known as the Father of English literature, is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages and was the first poet to have been buried in Poet's Corner of Westminster Abbey.
  3. 3. -The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer at the end of the 14th century, during the time of the Hundred Years War -The tales (mostly written in verse, although some are in prose). -It is Chaucer Magnum Opus, He uses the tales and the descriptions of its characters to paint an ironic and critical portrait of English society at the time, and particularly of the Church. Structurally, the collection resembles The Decameron, which Chaucer may have read during his first diplomatic mission to Italy in 1372.
  4. 4. The narrator opens the General Prologue with a description of the return of spring. He describes the April rains, the burgeoning flowers and leaves, and the chirping birds. Around this time of year, the narrator says, people begin to feel the desire to go on a pilgrimage. Many devout English pilgrims set off to visit shrines in distant holy lands, but even more choose to travel to Canterbury to visit the relics of SaintThomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral, where they thank the martyr for having helped them when they were in need.The narrator tells us that as he prepared to go on such a pilgrimage, staying at a tavern in Southwark called theTabard Inn, a great company of twenty-nine travelers entered.The travelers were a diverse group who, like the narrator, were on their way to Canterbury.They happily agreed to let him join them.That night, the group slept at theTabard, and woke up early the next morning to set off on their journey. Before continuing the tale, the narrator declares his intent to list and describe each of the members of the group.
  5. 5. Cousins Arcite and Palamon are captured and imprisoned by Theseus, duke ofAthens following his invention against Creon. Their cell is in the tower of Theseus's castle which overlooks his palace garden. In prison Palamon wakes early one morning in May, to see Emily (Emelye) in the courtyard; his moan is heard by Arcite, who then too wakes to see Emily, and falls in love with her as well. The competition brought about by this love causes them to hate each other. After some years,Arcite is released from prison through the good offices of Theseus's friend Pirithoos, and then returns to Athens in disguise and enters service in Emily's household. Palamon eventually escapes by drugging the jailer and while hiding in a grove overhears Arcite singing about love and fortune. They begin to duel with each other over who should get Emily, but are thwarted by the arrival of Theseus, who sentences them to gather 100 men apiece and fight a mass judicial tournament, the winner of which is to marry Emily. The forces assemble; Palamon prays to Venus to make Emily his wife; Emily prays to Diana to stay unmarried and that if that should prove impossible that she marry the one who really loves her; andArcite prays to Mars for victory. Theseus lays down rules for the tournament so that if any man becomes seriously injured, he must be dragged out of the battle and is no longer in combat. Because of this, the story seems to claim at the end that there were almost no deaths on either side. Although both Palamon and Arcite fight valiantly, Palamon is wounded by a sword thrust from one of Arcite's men, and is unhorsed. Theseus declares the fight to be over. Arcite wins the battle, but following an intervention by Saturn, is wounded by his horse throwing him off and then falling on him before he can claim Emily as his prize. As he dies, he tells Emily that she should marry Palamon, because he would make a good husband for her, and so Palamon marries Emily. Therefore all prayers were fulfilled by the gods for those who asked for their assistance.
  6. 6. CAMBYUSKAN-The king ofTartary 2 Sons Algarsyf Cambalo 1 Daughter Canace Horse Mirror/Sword Ring
  7. 7. Arviragus –The knight Dorigen –Wife Aurelius-Third Party ?xD When Arviragus travels on a military expedition, Dorigen laments his absence and fears that, when he returns, his ship will be wrecked upon the rocks off the shore. A young man, Aurelius, falls in love with her, but she refuses to return his favors. She agrees to have an affair with Aurelius only on the condition that he find a way to remove the rocks from the shore, a task she believes impossible. Aurelius pays a scholar who creates the illusion that the rocks have disappeared, while Arviragus returns. Dorigen admits to her husband the promise that she has made, and Arviragus tells her that she must fulfill that promise. He sends her to have an affair with Aurelius, but he realizes the pain that it would cause Dorigen and does not make her fulfill the promise.The student in turn absolvesAurelius of his debt.The tale ends with the question: which of these men behaved most generously and nobly?
  8. 8. He explains that once he had good clothes and a comfortable living, that he and the Canon are alchemists, and that he is so in debt because their attempts at alchemy always fail. He then tries to explain their occupation, their failed attempts at alchemy, and their elusive search for the Philosopher's Stone. A canon who practices alchemy borrows a mark from a priest. In three days time, the canon returns the mark and offers to reveal a couple of his discoveries. He sends for some quick silver and, by tricks, makes the priest believe that he turned the quick silver into real silver. Unaware of the trick, the priest is very pleased. Three times the canon tricks the priest, each time "turning" a less valuable object (quick silver, chalk, and then a twig) into silver. The beguiled priest buys the secret from the canon for 40 pounds, and the canon promptly disappears. The Yeoman ends his tale with a broadside attack on the subject of alchemy and a conglomeration of all the ridiculous terms used by alchemists.
  9. 9. the story of a young Christian child who lived in a town in Asia that was dominated by a vicious Jewish population.One child learned the “Alma redemptoris”, a song praising theVirgin Mary, and traveled home from school singing it.The Jews, angry at his behavior, took the child and slit his throat, leaving him in a cesspit to die.The boy's mother searched frantically for her son.When she found him, he was not yet dead, for the Virgin Mary had placed a grain on his tongue that would allow him to speak until it was removed. When this was removed, the boy passed on to heaven.The story ends with a lament for the young boy and a curse for the Jews who perpetrated the heinous crime.
  10. 10. Cecilia Valerian Tibertius Almachius Maximus
  11. 11. The Monk's tale to the other pilgrims is a collection of seventeen short stories, exempla, on the theme of tragedy.The tragic endings of the following historical figures are recounted: Lucifer, Adam, Samson, Hercules, Nebuchadnezzar, Belshazzar,Zenobia, Pedro of Castile, Peter I of Cyprus, Bernabò Visconti, Ugolino of Pisa, Nero, Holofernes,Antiochus,Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar and Croesus.
  12. 12. On the way to extort money from a widow, the Summoner encounters a yeoman who is apparently down on his luck. The two men swear brotherhood to each other and exchange the secrets of their respective trades, the Summoner recounting his various sins in a boastful manner. The yeoman reveals that he is actually a demon, to which the Summoner expresses minimal surprise—he enquires as to various aspects of hell and the forms that demons take. During their travels, they come upon a carter whose horses have become temporarily stuck. Frustrated, he says that the devil may take them. Hearing this, the Summoner asks the demon why he isn't holding him to his word and seizing the horses; he replies that the man does not truly mean what he says—that it is not his "entente" (intent)—and therefore he cannot take them. They proceed to the house of the widow. The Summoner fabricates a court summons in order that the widow will have to bribe him to dismiss the case. He also demands she give him her new pan in payment for an old debt, falsely claiming he paid a fine to get her off a charge of adultery. Incensed, the old woman damns the summoner to unless he repents of his false charges; when the devil confirms her "entente", and that the Summoner does not have any inclination to repent, he takes his body and soul—as well as the frying pan—to hell.
  13. 13. Tells a tale of an unfaithful wife.The Merchant'sTale tells a story of January, an elderly blind knight who decides to marry a young woman, despite the objections of his brother, Placebo. January marries the young and beautiful May, who soon becomes dissatisfied with his sexual attentions to her and decides to have an affair with his squire, Damian, who has secretly wooed her by signs and tokens.When January and May are in their garden, May sneaks away to have sex with Damian.The gods Pluto and Proserpina come upon Damian and May and Pluto restores January's sight so that he may see what his wife is doing.When January sees what is occurring, May tells him not to believe his eyes – they are recovering from the blindness - and he believes her: leading to an on-the-surface happy ending.
  14. 14. The Clerk's tale is about a marquis of Saluzzo in Piedmont in Italy named Walter, a bachelor who is asked by his subjects to marry to provide an heir. He assents and decides he will marry a peasant, named Griselda. Griselda is a poor girl, used to a life of pain and labour, who promises to honour Walter's wishes in all things. Griselda's child is kidnapped After Griselda has borne him a daughter, Walter decides to test her loyalty. He sends an officer to take the baby, pretending it will be killed, but actually conveying it in secret to Bologna. Griselda, because of her promise, makes no protest at this but only asks that the child be buried properly.When she bears a son several years later, Walter again has him taken from her under identical circumstances. Finally, Walter determines one last test. He has a Papal bull of annulmentforged which enables him to leave Griselda, and informs her that he intends to remarry. As part of his deception, he employs Griselda to prepare the wedding for his new bride. Meanwhile, he has brought the children from Bologna, and he presents his daughter as his intended wife. Eventually he informs Griselda of the deceit, who is overcome by joy at seeing her children alive, and they live happily ever after.
  15. 15. THEREARE SO MANY DIFFERENCES BETWEENTHESETHREE,YOU NEEDAVERY LONGTIMETO KNOW EACH OFTHEM.THERE ARE SOME EXAMPLEOF SPELLING DIFFERENCES. MIDDLE Whan that Aprill, with his shoures soote MODERN When in April the sweet showers fall
  16. 16. tragedy is next. Hercules' strength was unparalleled, but he was finally defeated when Deianera sent Hercules a poisoned shirt made by Nessus.
  17. 17. was the king of Babylon who had twice defeated Israel.The proud king constructed a large gold statue that he demanded his subjects pray to or else be cast into a pit of flames.Yet when Daniel disobeyed the king, Nebuchadnezzar lost all dignity, acting like a great beast until God relieved him of his insanity. The next tragedy is about Balthasar, the son of Nebuchadnezzar, who also worshipped false idols. He had a feast for a thousand lords in which they drank wine out of sacred vessels, but during his feast he saw an armless hand writing on a wall. Daniel warned Balthasar of his father's fate. Daniel warned him that his kingdom would be divided by Medes and the Persians. Balthasar, according to the Monk, exemplifies the way that Fortune makes friends with people before making enemies with them.
  18. 18. who was beautiful and victorious in war, is the next tragic hero of the tale.The queen of Palmyra refused the duties of women and refused to marry, until she was forced to wed Odenathus. She permitted him to have sex with her only so that she could get pregnant, but no more.Yet the proud woman, once Odenathus was dead, was defeated by the Romans and paraded through Rome bound in chains. King Pedro of Spain, subject of the next story, was cast from his kingdom by his brother.When attempting to regain his throne, Pedro was murdered by this brother. Peter, King of Cyprus, is the next subject; he brought ruin on his kingdom and was thus murdered.
  19. 19. BernaboVisconti, who wrongly imprisoned his nephew. Ugolino of Pisa, a count, was imprisoned in a tower in Pisa with his three young children after Ruggieri, the bishop of Pisa, had led a rebellion against him. His youngest son died of starvation, and out of his misery Ugolini gnawed on his own arms.The two children that remained thought that Ugolini was chewing himself out of hunger, and offered themselves as meals for him.They all eventually starved. Nero did nothing but satisfy his own lusts and even cut open his own mother to see the womb from which he came. He had Seneca murdered for stating that an emperor should be virtuous.When it appeared that Nero would be assassinated for his cruelty, he killed himself. Holofernesordered his subjects to renounce every law and worship Nebuchadnezzar. For this sin Judith cut off Holofernes' head as he was sleeping.
  20. 20. The Monk next tells of Antiochus Epiphanes, who was punished by God for attacks on the Jews. God made Antiochus infested with loathsome maggots.The Monk then admits that most have heard ofAlexander the Great, poisoned by his very own offspring. He follows with the tale of Julius Caesar, who had Pompey murdered but was himself assassinated by Brutus.The final story is of Croesus, King of Lydia, the proud and wealthy king who was hanged.

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