Brain Waves Short

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Electrical activity emanating from the brain is displayed in the form of brainwaves. There are four categories of these brainwaves, ranging from the most activity to the least activity

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  • The brain is an electrochemical organ. A fully functioning brain can generate as much as 10 watts of electrical power. Even though this electrical power is very limited, it does occur in very specific ways that are characteristic of the human brain. Electrical activity emanating from the brain is displayed in the form of brainwaves. There are four categories of these brainwaves, ranging from the most activity to the least activity. When the brain is aroused and actively engaged in mental activities, it generates beta waves of relatively low amplitude, and are the fastest of the four different brainwaves. The frequency of beta waves ranges from 15 to 40 cycles a second. Beta waves are characteristics of a strongly engaged mind. A person in active conversation would be in beta. A debater would be in high beta. A person making a speech, or a teacher, or a talk show host would all be in beta when they are engaged in their work.
  • The brain is an electrochemical organ. A fully functioning brain can generate as much as 10 watts of electrical power. Even though this electrical power is very limited, it does occur in very specific ways that are characteristic of the human brain. Electrical activity emanating from the brain is displayed in the form of brainwaves. There are four categories of these brainwaves, ranging from the most activity to the least activity. When the brain is aroused and actively engaged in mental activities, it generates beta waves of relatively low amplitude, and are the fastest of the four different brainwaves. The frequency of beta waves ranges from 15 to 40 cycles a second. Beta waves are characteristics of a strongly engaged mind. A person in active conversation would be in beta. A debater would be in high beta. A person making a speech, or a teacher, or a talk show host would all be in beta when they are engaged in their work.
  • A surface EEG reading is the summation of the synchronous activity of thousands or millions of neurons that have similar spatial orientation, radial to the scalp.
  • The next brainwave category in order of frequency is alpha. Where beta represented arousal, alpha represents non-arousal. Alpha brainwaves are slower, and higher in amplitude. Their frequency ranges from 9 to 14 cycles per second. A person who has completed a task and sits down to rest is often in an alpha state. A person who takes time out to reflect or meditate is usually in an alpha state.
  • Theta brainwaves, are typically of even greater amplitude and slower frequency. This frequency range is normally between 5 and 8 cycles a second. A person who has taken time off from a task and begins to daydream is often in a theta brainwave state. A person who is driving on a freeway, and discovers that they can't recall the last five miles, is often in a theta state--induced by the process of freeway driving. The repetitious nature of that form of driving compared to a country road would differentiate a theta state and a beta state in order to perform the driving task safely. Individuals who do a lot of freeway driving often get good ideas during those periods when they are in theta. Individuals who run outdoors often are in the state of mental relaxation that is slower than alpha and when in theta, they are prone to a flow of ideas . This can also occur in the shower or tub or even while shaving or brushing your hair. It is a state where tasks become so automatic that you can mentally disengage from them. The ideation that can take place during the theta state is often free flow and occurs without censorship or guilt. It is typically a very positive mental state.
  • Delta brainwaves are of the greatest amplitude and slowest frequency. They typically center around a range of 1.5 to 4 cycles per second. They never go down to zero because that would mean that you were brain dead. But, deep dreamless sleep would take you down to the lowest frequency. Typically, 2 to 3 cycles a second. When we go to bed and read for a few minutes before attempting sleep, we are likely to be in low beta. When we put the book down, turn off the lights and close our eyes, our brainwaves will descend from beta, to alpha, to theta and finally, when we fall asleep, to delta.
  • Sympathetic neurons are frequently considered part of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), although many lie within the central nervous system (CNS). Sympathetic neurons of the spinal cord (part of the CNS) communicate with peripheral sympathetic neurons via a series of sympathetic ganglia. Within the ganglia, spinal cord sympathetic neurons join peripheral sympathetic neurons through chemical synapses. Spinal cord sympathetic neurons are therefore called presynaptic (or preganglionic ) neurons, while peripheral sympathetic neurons are called postsynaptic (or postganglionic ) neurons. At synapses within the sympathetic ganglia, preganglionic sympathetic neurons release acetylcholine, a chemical messenger that binds and activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on postganglionic neurons. In response to this stimulus, postganglionic neurons principally release noradrenaline (norepinephrine). Prolonged activation can elicit the release of adrenaline from the adrenal medulla. Once released, norepinephrine and epinephrine bind adrenergic receptors on peripheral tissues. Binding to adrenergic receptors causes the effects seen during the fight-or-flight response. (pupil dilation, increased heart rate, and increased blood pressure. The sympathetic nervous system involves spinal nerves T1 to L2 or L3. This stimulation, sympathetic or parasympathetic, is to control smooth muscle contraction, regulate cardiac muscle, or stimulate or inhibit glandular secretion. The actions of the parasympathetic nervous system can be summarized as "rest and digest" (as opposed to the "fight-or-flight" effects of the sympathetic nervous system). one may think of the sympathetic division as the accelerator and the parasympathetic division as the brake. The sympathetic division typically functions in actions requiring quick responses. The parasympathetic division functions with actions that do not require immediate reaction. The main actions of the parasympathetic nervous system are summarized by the phrase "rest and repose" or "rest and digest" (in contrast to the "fight-or-flight" of the sympathetic nervous system). A rarely used (but useful) acronym to summarize the functions of the parasympathetic nervous system is SLUDD (salivation, lacrimation, urination, digestion and defecation).
  • Sympathetic neurons are frequently considered part of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), although many lie within the central nervous system (CNS). Sympathetic neurons of the spinal cord (part of the CNS) communicate with peripheral sympathetic neurons via a series of sympathetic ganglia. Within the ganglia, spinal cord sympathetic neurons join peripheral sympathetic neurons through chemical synapses. Spinal cord sympathetic neurons are therefore called presynaptic (or preganglionic ) neurons, while peripheral sympathetic neurons are called postsynaptic (or postganglionic ) neurons. At synapses within the sympathetic ganglia, preganglionic sympathetic neurons release acetylcholine, a chemical messenger that binds and activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on postganglionic neurons. In response to this stimulus, postganglionic neurons principally release noradrenaline (norepinephrine). Prolonged activation can elicit the release of adrenaline from the adrenal medulla. Once released, norepinephrine and epinephrine bind adrenergic receptors on peripheral tissues. Binding to adrenergic receptors causes the effects seen during the fight-or-flight response. (pupil dilation, increased heart rate, and increased blood pressure. The sympathetic nervous system involves spinal nerves T1 to L2 or L3. This stimulation, sympathetic or parasympathetic, is to control smooth muscle contraction, regulate cardiac muscle, or stimulate or inhibit glandular secretion. The actions of the parasympathetic nervous system can be summarized as "rest and digest" (as opposed to the "fight-or-flight" effects of the sympathetic nervous system). one may think of the sympathetic division as the accelerator and the parasympathetic division as the brake. The sympathetic division typically functions in actions requiring quick responses. The parasympathetic division functions with actions that do not require immediate reaction. The main actions of the parasympathetic nervous system are summarized by the phrase "rest and repose" or "rest and digest" (in contrast to the "fight-or-flight" of the sympathetic nervous system). A rarely used (but useful) acronym to summarize the functions of the parasympathetic nervous system is SLUDD (salivation, lacrimation, urination, digestion and defecation).
  • Brain Waves Short

    1. 1. <ul><li>Brain Waves </li></ul>
    2. 2. <ul><li>Brain Waves </li></ul>
    3. 3. The Brain <ul><li>An electro-chemical organ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Emits signals as result of its activity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can generate as much as 10 watts of electrical power </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Brain activity ignals (EEG and MEG) can be recorded as brain waves </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Often expressed in Hz or cycles per second </li></ul></ul></ul>A surface EEG is the sum of the effect of millions of neurons with similar orientation to the scalp.
    4. 4. Delta is the wave of healing Waves and the Immune System Dominant EEG Frequency Frequency Category Mental State 15 - 40Hz Beta Alertness   Concentration   Cognition   10 - 15Hz Alpha The   Zone   Calmness   Visualization   Creativity   8 - 10Hz Low Alpha peaceful, contemplative 4 - 8Hz Theta Deep   Meditation   Intuition   Memory   Mysticism   1.5 - 4Hz Delta Healing   Deep   Sleep   Detached   Awareness
    5. 5. Brain Waves Beta <ul><li>Alertness, Concentration, Cognition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Beta waves range between 13-40 Hz </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eye-hand coordination; visual acuity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wide awake </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mental  alertness and higher levels of external concentration that help prepare for an exam. </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Brain Waves Alpha <ul><li>Non-arousal . R & R </li></ul><ul><li>“ The zone,” visualization </li></ul><ul><li>Fears and anxiety dissolve </li></ul><ul><li>Enhanced Creativity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alpha waves range between 9-14 Hz </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Slower and of higher amplitude </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rest, Meditation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gateway to deeper states of consciousness </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Brain Waves Theta <ul><li>Daydreaming, monotonous driving, showering </li></ul><ul><li>Deep meditation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Theta waves range between 5-8 Hz (slower than alpha) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The ideation that can take place is often free flow and without self-censorship or guilt. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It is a very positive mental state. </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. Brain Waves Delta <ul><li>Deep Sleep </li></ul><ul><li>The brain wave of the subconscious </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You remain conscious in a deep delta state </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Triggers release of human growth hormone </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Healing and regeneration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Delta waves range between 2-3 Hz </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. <ul><li>Sympathetic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ fight or flight” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Alertness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Beta Waves </li></ul></ul>Autonomic Nervous System
    10. 10. <ul><li>Sympathetic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ fight or flight” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Parasympathetic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;rest and digest“ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Triggers release of H G H </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Healing and regeneration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Delta waves </li></ul></ul>Autonomic Nervous System

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