Engauge Lunch & Learn - Participation Nation

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  • Engauge Lunch & Learn - Participation Nation

    1. 1. Lunch & LearnParticipation Nation 9.28.11
    2. 2. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANT
    3. 3. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANT
    4. 4. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goodsand services for personal useWikipedia
    5. 5. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia
    6. 6. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product
    7. 7. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product
    8. 8. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product •Reads and comments on your company blog
    9. 9. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product •Reads and comments on your company blog •“Likes” your Facebook page
    10. 10. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product •Reads and comments on your company blog •“Likes” your Facebook page •Follows and interacts with your brand on Twitter
    11. 11. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product •Reads and comments on your company blog •“Likes” your Facebook page •Follows and interacts with your brand on Twitter •Shares information about your brand
    12. 12. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product •Reads and comments on your company blog •“Likes” your Facebook page •Follows and interacts with your brand on Twitter •Shares information about your brand •Watches/shares/comments on branded videos
    13. 13. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product •Reads and comments on your company blog •“Likes” your Facebook page •Follows and interacts with your brand on Twitter •Shares information about your brand •Watches/shares/comments on branded videos •Blogs about your brand
    14. 14. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product •Reads and comments on your company blog •“Likes” your Facebook page •Follows and interacts with your brand on Twitter •Shares information about your brand •Watches/shares/comments on branded videos •Blogs about your brand •Plays a branded game
    15. 15. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product •Reads and comments on your company blog •“Likes” your Facebook page •Follows and interacts with your brand on Twitter •Shares information about your brand •Watches/shares/comments on branded videos •Blogs about your brand •Plays a branded game •Interacts with OOH or experiential execution
    16. 16. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product •Reads and comments on your company blog •“Likes” your Facebook page •Follows and interacts with your brand on Twitter •Shares information about your brand •Watches/shares/comments on branded videos •Blogs about your brand •Plays a branded game •Interacts with OOH or experiential execution •Downloads a mobile app
    17. 17. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product •Reads and comments on your company blog •“Likes” your Facebook page •Follows and interacts with your brand on Twitter •Shares information about your brand •Watches/shares/comments on branded videos •Blogs about your brand •Plays a branded game •Interacts with OOH or experiential execution •Downloads a mobile app •Signs up for brand emails
    18. 18. THE SHIFT CONSUMER PARTICIPANTDefinition: A person who purchases goods Definition: A person who takes part inand services for personal use somethingWikipedia Wikipedia•Purchases your brand/product •May purchase your brand/product •Reads and comments on your company blog •“Likes” your Facebook page •Follows and interacts with your brand on Twitter •Shares information about your brand •Watches/shares/comments on branded videos •Blogs about your brand •Plays a branded game •Interacts with OOH or experiential execution •Downloads a mobile app •Signs up for brand emails •Scans a 2D Code
    19. 19. PARTICIPANT BEHAVIORAL TRENDSInformed Consumerism!More than ever, being selective of and knowledgeable about thebrands and services one chooses. Driven by an abundance ofratings & reviews, easy access to information and an age of Visual Consumption!corporate transparency. A preference for making things visual, even tangible at times, as opposed to text or sound. Seen through the popularity of infographics, photos, videos and augmented reality.Oversharing!Life-casting to the extreme. Sharing the minutia, often times whatused to be private or unknown – location, health, purchases, each Positive Reinforcement!and every meal and more. I !like" it if you do. Consumers are more and more looking for verification and support for their opinions or decisions. Every !like," re-tweet or recommendation helps.Virtual Materialism!From physical goods to virtual possessions. Consumers are nolonger purchasing paper books, DVDs and magazines, they are Small Acts of Kindness!utilizing iPods, Kindles and services like Netflix. Trophies, posters Giving, donating or contributing without expecting something inand bumper stickers are being replaced by virtual badges, online return. This is more in terms of small donations, as opposed toaffiliations and points. Digital enables limitless inventory. contributing lengthy amounts of time, money or energy.You as an Editor! Instant Gratification!While the abundance of easy-access content was and is exciting,this is a movement toward turning off the !stream." Figuring out Expecting to get what you want, when you want it – whether it#s ahow to live a connected life without being continually distracted or discount, customer service or a connection you may not haveinundated. Being selective. access to without the help of technology.Accidental Discovery! Local-vore!In an always on, digitally connected world, the want for A movement toward staying close to home in terms of community,randomness, serendipity or surprise encounters. purchases, news and more.
    20. 20. INNOVATION TRENDS CONTEXTUAL CONNECTIONS “LIKE”ONOMICS MAKE IT PERSONALRECREATING THE TRADITIONAL CROWDSOURCED INNOVATION MOVE SOMEONE & CO CREATION
    21. 21. CONTEXTUAL CONNECTIONSConnect with participants within the context of their normalroutines and behaviors. Instant Gratification Accidental Discovery
    22. 22. 28% of American adults use mobile or sociallocation-based services, including mobile maps
    23. 23. 1/10 set up their Twitter and FB accounts todisclose their location when they post via automatic tagging
    24. 24. 28% of people use their mobile phone to search while running errands
    25. 25. CONTEXTUAL CONNECTIONSSynopsis:Six Flags partnered with Ask.com toprovide a relevant experience to users atpark locations. Based on a user’slocation the Ask.com app will launch a“Skip the Line” game where guests canlearn point and win a move to the frontof the line if they answer trivia questionscorrectly.Participant Trends: Instant Gratification
    26. 26. CONTEXTUAL CONNECTIONSSynopsis:Vitaminwater highlighted its “energy-boosting” properties with bus shelterads in 4 cities that included a 5-voltbattery-powered USB port. Participantscould charge their phones, iPods,gaming devices etc. while waiting for thebus. By providing relevant, utilitarianvalue the brand was able to drive homethe product benefits in an interesting,unique way.Participant Trends: Instant Gratification Accidental Discovery Small Acts of Kindness
    27. 27. CONTEXTUAL CONNECTIONSSynopsis:Cadbury’s just launched an AugmentedReality game that uses candy barsthemselves as the trigger that allowsusers to access the game. Byincorporating the product into the gameplay they are able to drive sales andbrand engagement through aninnovative execution.Participant Trends: Visual Consumption Accidental Discovery
    28. 28. CONTEXTUAL CONNECTIONSSynopsis:GranataPet Food connected with dogowners while they were out and aboutwalking their dogs by offering freesamples of pet food at specific OOHplacement. Users checked intoFoursquare at the billboard location andthe check-in triggered ready-to-eatsamples that were dispensed into anattached bowl.Participant Trends: Instant Gratification Accidental Discovery
    29. 29. “LIKE”onomics“Likes” are currency for your brand. Earn brand love via social sharing. Oversharing Positive Reinforcement
    30. 30. LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATIONEach fan of a Facebook page = an extra 20 visits to the website
    31. 31. 56% of Facebook fans say they are more likely to recommend a brand after becoming a fan
    32. 32. 51% of fans say that they are more likely tobuy a product after becoming a Facebook fan.
    33. 33. “LIKE”onomicsSynopsis:Coca Cola used RFID bracelets to allowusers to “Like” attractions, rides andexperiences in the real world at theVillage Amusement Park in Israel. Theysaw over 35K updates a day that weregenerated by just 600 guests.Participant Trends: Oversharing Positive Reinforcement
    34. 34. “LIKE”onomicsSynopsis:European car company Renault usedFacebook Connect and RFID to make thecars on display at the Amsterdam autoshow “Like”-able. The “like” was sharedon the attendees’ Facebook pages andgenerated discussion in thesocialsphere.Participant Trends: Oversharing Positive Reinforcement Informed Consumerism
    35. 35. “LIKE”onomicsSynopsis:Diesel has begun implementing anapplication that allows users to “Like” aproduct on Facebook via QR codesdirectly at POP in physical retaillocations.Participant Trends: Oversharing Positive Reinforcement Informed Consumerism
    36. 36. MAKE IT PERSONALPersonalizing the content and experiences provides an extra layer of connection to the participant. In aworld overflowing with connections, it is needed to help your brand stand out. You as Editor Local-vore Small Acts of Kindness
    37. 37. 78% of people believe that organizationsproviding custom content are interested in building good relationships with them
    38. 38. 3/4 participants arewilling to provide somemeaningful amount ofpersonal informationin exchange for a more personalized, relevant experience
    39. 39. 61% of people feel better about acompany that delivers personalizedexperiences and aremore likely to buy from that company
    40. 40. MAKE IT PERSONALSynopsis:Intel’s “Museum of Me” video let’s userstour a “visual archive” of their social lifeusing Facebook Connect. The executionthen incorporates personal content fromthe user’s Facebook page into the“exhibit”. The experience was used topromote the company’s Core i5processor.Participant Trends: Oversharing Visual Consumption
    41. 41. MAKE IT PERSONALSynopsis:KLM recently used 140 employees tocreate personalized video responsesto questions posted on Twitter. Thetag line of the campaign is “KLManswers every tweet and post inperson. Within the hour. Day andnight.” Not only are they applying abest social media managementpractice, but they are doing it in avery unique and innovative way.Participant Trends: Oversharing Visual Consumption
    42. 42. MAKE IT PERSONALSynopsis:Tipp-Ex, a European whiteout brandallowed users to rewrite the ending of anonline video in which a hunterencounters a bear and must decidewhether or not to shoot it. They shot 50different endings and let userscustomize the video they viewed basedon the new title they typed in.Participant Trends: You as Editor Visual Consumption
    43. 43. RECREATING THE TRADITIONALInnovation doesn’t have to be outside the box. It can be innovatively executing within existing boxes.Content and user controlled experiences leveraging advanced technologies can your brand do this. Accidental Discovery Visual Consumption Instant Gratification
    44. 44. RECREATING THE TRADITIONALSynopsis:Reporters Without Borders published fourdifferent print ads. People where ask toscan the QR code at the bottom of the adand place their iPhone on the mouth ofthe person. Is isn’t the mouth of theperson on the photo who speak but ajournalist speaking about what ishappening in Libya, Iran or Russia. Afterthe film people where redirected to adedicated campaign site where they couldfind more information about ReportersWithout Borders and an explanation of thecampaign.Participant Trends: Visual Consumption Accidental Discovery
    45. 45. RECREATING THE TRADITIONALSynopsis:Newcastle recently commissioned twoshadow artists to create a billboard thatuses bottle caps, shadow and light to castan image of a man reaching for a beer.The billboard highlights the brand’s“Lighter Side of Dark” campaign.Participant Trends: Accidental Discovery Visual Consumption
    46. 46. RECREATING THE TRADITIONALSynopsis:AXA, a Belgium insurance brand launchedan immersive TV ad which allowed usersto step into the ad via their iPhones. Thead prompted users to scan a QR codewithin the commercial which then allowedusers to see the story unfold with a firstperson view on their phone.Participant Trends: Visual Consumption Accidental Discovery
    47. 47. RECREATING THE TRADITIONALSynopsis:To celebrate a “baby boom” of animals,the Amsterdam Zoo placed removablestickers on posters across the city.Anyone could remove the stickers ofbaby giraffes, penguins, parrots andmore and place them elsewhere. Aguerrilla campaign that proves that eventraditional advertising can go “viral.”Participant Trends: Visual Consumption Accidental Discovery Local-vore
    48. 48. CROWDSOURCED INNOVATION & CO-CREATIONParticipants want to feel involved and connected to brands and products they love. Let them! Allow users togenerate content to promote & create your products and positioning. Oversharing Informed Consumerism You as Editor
    49. 49. 44% of companies have used crowdsourcingto help provide ideas and solutions to business problems
    50. 50. 43% had betterproduct ideas orrequirements as a result of crowdsourcing
    51. 51. CROWDSOURCED INNOVATION & CO-CREATIONSynopsis:ModCloth uses crowdsourcing to allowusers to vote on products that shouldbe featured as “Be The Buyer” picks.This use of crowdsourcing helps toguide merchandizing, drive sales, andfoster the independent culture that thecompany is built around.Participant Trends: Oversharing You as Editor Informed Consumerism
    52. 52. CROWDSOURCED INNOVATION & CO-CREATIONSynopsis:In an attempt to position itself as anonline industry authority in all things“sneaker,” Foot Locker launched alightly-branded Sneakerpedia, aWikipedia for sneakerheads. The site isorganized by year, brand, type, materialand more. Users can also record their“personal sneaker stories.” There is nolink to buy the sneakers; it’s just forpure fun!Participant Trends: You as Editor Informed Consumerism
    53. 53. CROWDSOURCED INNOVATION & CO-CREATIONSynopsis:Starbuck and Dell both usecrowdsourcing for ongoing product andservice innovation though theMyStarbucksidea and IdeaStormwebsites respectively. Both sites requireusers to log in. Ideas are posted to the“crowd” and those that receive a highnumber of community votes get put intoproductions. Both sites also updateusers on the status of ideas that are ontheir way to implementation.Participant Trends: You as Editor Informed Consumerism
    54. 54. MOVE SOMEONEParticipants want to connect with something larger than a product. Create a movement that wraps a productof cause in a container of passion-driven action. Small Acts of Kindness Local-vore You as Editor
    55. 55. 71% of participants endorse thestatement, “I make a point to buy brands from companies whose values are similar to my own.”
    56. 56. 85% of millennials will buy a product where a portion of the sales support a good cause
    57. 57. MOVE SOMEONESynopsis:Two runners on opposite sides of the worldrepresented Gatorade’s Night and Dayflavors, and raced in their respective cities/time of day. Users were able to follow onsocial channels and voice their support foreach of the athletes. After the initial race,thousands participated in a second race,racing for either Day or Night. In only 6weeks, sales of Gatorade Day and Nightsurpassed the four months volume forecast.300K unique visitors from 54 countriesfollowed the challenge on Gatorade’swebsite, and more than 12K followed theevent live on Twitter.Participant Trends: Local-vore
    58. 58. MOVE SOMEONESynopsis:American Express OPEN declaredthe Saturday after ThanksgivingSmall Business Saturday. AmericanExpress gave $100 in free Facebookadvertising to the first 10,000businesses that signed up for theprogram. Over 1.2M people joinedthe movement by “liking” SmallBusiness Saturday on Facebook,and nearly 30K tweets were sentusing the has tags#smallbusinesssaturday and#smallbizsaturday.Participant Trends: Local-vore Small Acts of Kindness
    59. 59. MOVE SOMEONESynopsis:Coca Cola just concluded acampaign focused on driving usersto vote for their favorite park aspart of the “America is Your Park”campaign. Participants were askedto vote and the 3 parks thatreceived the most votes wereawarded grants that will helprestore, rebuild and enhancerecreational areas.Participant Trends: Local-vore Small Acts of Kindness
    60. 60. THANK YOU!@Nicola_Smith22

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