Framework for analysing_elegy

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Framework for analysing_elegy

  1. 1. Framework for Analysing Single Texts Overview ( Content/Context): It was written in 1722, and it is about the death of John Churchill, the duke of Marlborough. Churchill had a diplomatic and military career, and was a political enemy of the poet Jonathan Swift. Statement Evidence Analysis Structure and Form Rhyme scheme is aa bb cc. Enjambment “…dead!...bed…” See line 3-4 It gives the poem a happy feel, contrasting the topic of the poem, mocking the Duke’s death. The enjambment shows he is enjoying making fun of the general. Narrative Stance Third person “His grace!” Gives the feel that the writer is watching/ observing, pokes fun at the Duke. Grammar and Sentence Structure Incorrect grammar Exclamatory mood “His grace! impossible..” See line 1 The poet doesn’t want the exclamations to be separate, he wants them all as one sentence because it shows the rush and surprise of the death. The exclamation marks show surprise but he’s not surprised about the death- mocking the general. Lexis and Imagery War lexis Rhetorical questions “Warrior”, “fall”, “tramp”, “stronger”, “mighty” “And so inglorious, after all?” Links to the main character and juxtaposition of the word “mighty” and “inglorious” mocks the general Makes the answer sound obvious/sarcastic- mocking the general Phonology and Sound Patterning Iambic tetrameter Fast pace contrasts the sad theme of the poem and adds to the mocking of the general’s death.

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