Exploring Caliban in the first two acts of The Tempest

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Exploring Caliban in the first two acts of The Tempest

  1. 1. Starter – How many words can you make? What is the 9 letter word? n l a  i c b s n a
  2. 2. Monday, 16th December 2013 L.O: To explore the character of Caliban and how he relates to the theme of power and control.
  3. 3. Success Criteria: 3. You MUST understand the character of Caliban and show awareness of how he relates the theme of power. (C grade description)  2. You SHOULD analyse the character of Caliban and identify and comment on how he relates to the theme of power. (B grade description) 1. You COULD analyse and evaluate the character of Caliban and how he relates to the theme of power and wider context. (A-A* grade description)
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  5. 5. The significance of Caliban   What impressions do these pictures give the audience of this character?  Caliban might represent people’s views of the natives of newly discovered lands during the 1600s.  Think about how Prospero treats Caliban.  Why do you think the character is called Caliban?
  6. 6. Look at the images   Discuss and annotate.  How might these images from travel documents have influenced Shakespeare and his audience?  What might they be expecting from a native of a faraway island?
  7. 7. Prospero’s Description of Caliban – Act 1 Scene 2 Lines 281 – 284   Then was this island-Save for the son that she did litter here, A freckled whelp hag-born--not honour'd with A human shape.
  8. 8. Prospero’s initial treatment of Caliban - Act 1 Scene 2 Lines 333 – 364  CALIBAN: This island's mine, by Sycorax my mother, Which thou takest from me. When thou camest first, Thou strokedst me and madest much of me, wouldst give me Water with berries in't, and teach me how To name the bigger light, and how the less, That burn by day and night: and then I loved thee And show'd thee all the qualities o' the isle, The fresh springs, brine-pits, barren place and fertile: Cursed be I that did so! All the charms Of Sycorax, toads, beetles, bats, light on you! For I am all the subjects that you have, Which first was mine own king: and here you sty me In this hard rock, whiles you do keep from me The rest o' the island. PROSPERO: Thou most lying slave, Whom stripes may move, not kindness! I have used thee, Filth as thou art, with human care, and lodged thee In mine own cell, till thou didst seek to violate The honour of my child. CALIBAN: O ho, O ho! would't had been done! Thou didst prevent me; I had peopled else This isle with Calibans. MIRANDA: Abhorred slave, Which any print of goodness wilt not take, Being capable of all ill! I pitied thee, Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour One thing or other: when thou didst not, savage, Know thine own meaning, but wouldst gabble like A thing most brutish, I endow'd thy purposes With words that made them known. But thy vile race, Though thou didst learn, had that in't which good natures Could not abide to be with; therefore wast thou Deservedly confined into this rock, Who hadst deserved more than a prison. CALIBAN: You taught me language; and my profit on't Is, I know how to curse. The red plague rid you For learning me your language!
  9. 9. Act 2:Scene 2  Caliban continues to act as Prospero’s servant, collecting wood and cursing his master. Caliban represents the natives of an island – the audience needs to think about the way that he is treated. Is he civilised or savage?
  10. 10. His speech: Act 2Scene 2   All the infections that the sun sucks up From bogs, fens, flats, on Prosper fall and make him By inch-meal a disease! His spirits hear me And yet I needs must curse. But they'll nor pinch, Fright me with urchin--shows, pitch me i'the mire, Nor lead me, like a firebrand, in the dark Out of my way, unless he bid 'em; but For every trifle are they set upon me; Sometime like apes that mow and chatter at me And after bite me, then like hedgehogs which Lie tumbling in my barefoot way and mount Their pricks at my footfall; sometime am I All wound with adders who with cloven tongues Do hiss me into madness
  11. 11. Trinculo stumbles across Caliban, and describes him:  What have we here? a man or a fish? dead or alive? A fish: he smells like a fish; a very ancient and fish- like smell; a kind of not of the newest Poor-John. A strange fish! Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver: there would this monster make a man; any strange beast there makes a man: when they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lazy out ten to see a dead Indian. Legged like a man and his fins like arms! Warm o' my troth! I do now let loose my opinion; hold it no longer: this is no fish, but an islander, that hath lately suffered by a thunderbolt. Highlight the words he uses to describe Caliban. What opportunities does he see if he could capture Caliban and return him to Europe?
  12. 12. Review   Who has power over Caliban?  Does he hold any power? Consider what happens with Stephano and Trinculo, who is in control here?
  13. 13. Knowledge check   Come up with three questions to test another group’s knowledge of Caliban and how he relates to the wider themes of the play.  Your group must know the answer to the question! 5 minutes
  14. 14. Question types  1. Must be a simple knowledge question. 2. Must be an analysis question. 3. Must be an evaluation question. 5 minutes
  15. 15. Success Criteria: 3. You MUST understand the character of Caliban and show awareness of how he relates the theme of power. (C grade description)  2. You SHOULD analyse the character of Caliban and identify and comment on how he relates to the theme of Power. (B grade description) 1. You COULD analyse and evaluate the character of Caliban and how he relates to the theme of power and wider context. (A-A* grade description)

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