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ways to
find out what
customers want
⋆
emilyobyrne.com
15
2
You need to ask at the point where
you're designing the product or service.
Otherwise, you'll end up trying to sell a
pr...
3
What do they want to buy?
How do they like to buy?
Did they get what they wanted out of what they
bought?
What do they w...
4
1Paper or electronic - try Type form
and SurveyMonkey.
Ask existing customers about
their experiences with you.
Share on...
5
2Face to face, over the phone, or via Skype.
They work best with a bit of a plan. And
with a second person to take notes...
6
3‘Contextual inquiry’ is a special kind of
interview to uncover how people really use
a product or system.
Ask the perso...
7
4Get a bunch of customers into a
room for a group interview. Sounds
easier than it is.
One or two strong voices can skew...
8
5Most blogging platforms have
a comment feature. Enable it.
When you post news about
your business, encourage
your custo...
9
⋆
6Running a shop, restaurant
or other bricks and mortar
business?
Leave out feedback cards
and pens, or include them
wi...
10
7If your online store software
allows, turn on reviews and
ratings. It’s a great way to
get specific feedback about
pro...
11
8When someone buys something
from you, email them to ask them
about their experience.
Selling low volume, high value it...
12
9Feedback can be face to
face, too.
Every so often when you
meet with a customer, ask
them if there’s anything
else you...
13
10Offer customers every opportunity
to talk to you.
Make sure they know how to reach
you via email and social channels....
14
11Set up alerts for any mentions of
your business, especially those
including ‘help’ or ‘#fail’.
Try saved searches in ...
15
|
12Your web analytics can tell you a
lot about what your customers
think of your site.
Google Analytics is packed with...
16
LJ
13Who else is trying to attract
your customers? What are
they offering? How is it the
same or different from what
you...
17
14Once you know your
competition, you can look at
their blog comments and
reviews.
What do people love or loathe
about ...
18
15What do people want to
know?
Try sites like Quora. Search
for questions that relate to
your business.
Specialist foru...
19
?If you've never thought about this
topic at all, start with 10 - get your
contact information up on your site.
Then tr...
20
What do you find difficult?
What tips would you share?
How do you listen to
your customers?
emilyobyrne.com
Thanks for ...
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15 ways to find out what customers want

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Asking “what does my customer want?” as you start working on the marketing campaign is too late. Find out before you start creating or changing your products and services. Here are 15 easy ways to get started.

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15 ways to find out what customers want

  1. 1. ways to find out what customers want ⋆ emilyobyrne.com 15
  2. 2. 2 You need to ask at the point where you're designing the product or service. Otherwise, you'll end up trying to sell a product your customer doesn’t want. Or a service that solves a problem they don’t have. Asking “what does my customer want?” as you start working on the marketing campaign is too late.
  3. 3. 3 What do they want to buy? How do they like to buy? Did they get what they wanted out of what they bought? What do they want you to tell them? How do they want you to contact them? How did they find you? What do they love about you? What do they find difficult about dealing with you? So many questions… ? Here are15 ways to get answers
  4. 4. 4 1Paper or electronic - try Type form and SurveyMonkey. Ask existing customers about their experiences with you. Share on social media to research a new product or service. Look for specialist community forums, to target a particular group, Ask people if they're available for follow-up - great to get people for interviews and testing. Surveys
  5. 5. 5 2Face to face, over the phone, or via Skype. They work best with a bit of a plan. And with a second person to take notes. Record the interview, if your interviewee is okay with that. Ask open questions to draw out lots of detail. When they stop answering, pause. They’ll tell you more. Avoid asking people to speculate. Stick to real experiences. Interviews
  6. 6. 6 3‘Contextual inquiry’ is a special kind of interview to uncover how people really use a product or system. Ask the person you are interviewing to carry out a task using your product or service. Watch like a hawk. Do they use it the way you expect? What do they find hard? When do they smile or frown? Ask people to think aloud as they work, to get even more detail. If you have any kind of website or mobile app, you can also do this online. Try UserTesting, or the free version, Peek. Watch and learn
  7. 7. 7 4Get a bunch of customers into a room for a group interview. Sounds easier than it is. One or two strong voices can skew the feedback from the whole group. If your customers know you, (or even if they don't) they can worry about being rude. Getting an outsider to run the session can help. Getting 10 or 12 people together for a couple of hours at a time that suits everyone isn't always easy. Goody bags or other incentives can help. Focus groups
  8. 8. 8 5Most blogging platforms have a comment feature. Enable it. When you post news about your business, encourage your customers to leave a comment. Yes, you’ll have to deal with all the bots and the spam. But turning off comments is like talking to your customers with your hands over your ears. Don’t be that guy. Blog comments
  9. 9. 9 ⋆ 6Running a shop, restaurant or other bricks and mortar business? Leave out feedback cards and pens, or include them with the bill. Make it obvious where customers should drop their completed card. Feedback cards
  10. 10. 10 7If your online store software allows, turn on reviews and ratings. It’s a great way to get specific feedback about products. It helps your customers too. Feedback from other customers helps new buyers to make the right choice. Think about incentives to get people to leave reviews. Reviews
  11. 11. 11 8When someone buys something from you, email them to ask them about their experience. Selling low volume, high value items? You can probably do this by hand. Selling higher volumes? Look at email automation - Mailchimp Pay as You Go is a cheap way to try it out. Tip: remind them to leave a review at the same time. Followup emails
  12. 12. 12 9Feedback can be face to face, too. Every so often when you meet with a customer, ask them if there’s anything else you can do to help. If you sell anything mechanical, design your aftercare service to include this kind of conversation. Conversations
  13. 13. 13 10Offer customers every opportunity to talk to you. Make sure they know how to reach you via email and social channels. If your inbox breaks under the strain, get a system to track emails and follow-up tasks, and share them around the team. Streak is a nifty plugin that turns Gmail into a full on CRM system for free. Contact information
  14. 14. 14 11Set up alerts for any mentions of your business, especially those including ‘help’ or ‘#fail’. Try saved searches in Twitter, or use one of the many social listening tools on the market. While you’re at it, set up Google alerts for any mentions of you on the web, too. If you get a lot of mentions and messages via social media, look for a dashboard tool that lets you manage this stuff like email. Listen to the web
  15. 15. 15 | 12Your web analytics can tell you a lot about what your customers think of your site. Google Analytics is packed with free information - though you might want to take a course or get some expert help to get started. Content analytics tools can even tell you where people click on a page and how far down it they read. The SumoMe plugin lets you try this for free. Listen to clicks
  16. 16. 16 LJ 13Who else is trying to attract your customers? What are they offering? How is it the same or different from what you’re offering? This information is useful when you’re planning surveys and interviews. It’s essential if you’re designing something new for your customers. Look at the market
  17. 17. 17 14Once you know your competition, you can look at their blog comments and reviews. What do people love or loathe about your competitors' products and services. What are the killer features? What extra features do customers want? How could you do it better? Mine reviews
  18. 18. 18 15What do people want to know? Try sites like Quora. Search for questions that relate to your business. Specialist forums can give you even more detail, on what people want, like, and dislike. This is a fantastic place to start in the early stage of a business, when you don’t actually have any customers. Investigate forums
  19. 19. 19 ?If you've never thought about this topic at all, start with 10 - get your contact information up on your site. Then try 11 - listening on social media. If you’ve not ever touched suggestion 13 - looking at the market you’re in - then please do! It takes a couple of hours and a web browser, and you can learn so much from the exercise. Where to begin?
  20. 20. 20 What do you find difficult? What tips would you share? How do you listen to your customers? emilyobyrne.com Thanks for watching …

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