Key Strategies for Writing aMilitary-to-Civilian ResumeHow to make your resume more competitive whentransitioning into the...
Common problems withmilitary-to-civilian resumesidentified by employers• Overuse of military jargon and abbreviations• Ten...
Employer misconceptions aboutVeteran applicants• Veterans are inflexible, unable to adapt• Lack innovation/creativity• Lac...
Know who you are and howyou want to be perceived• Explore who you are• Identify your career interests, goals and objective...
Sell it, Don’t tell itTelling It• Describes features• Tells what and how• Details activities• Focuses on past activitieswi...
Key Words• Identify key words and phrases that are specific to the civiliancareer/job you are seeking• Recruiters will und...
Example of Military to CivilianOccupation Translator
Examples of Keywords• Operations Management:• Production planning; scheduling; materials management; inventory control;qua...
Sample of Job Posting Key Words← Specific Knowledge, Skills and Abilities are listed← Action Verbs used to describe requir...
Focus on the big things• Program implementation, special projects, cost savings, efficiencyand productivity evaluation, te...
Purpose of the Resume• To get you the interview; From there it can guide/direct theinterviewer’s questions• Feature your k...
Structured resumes reduce confusion• Recruiters scan through resumes quickly,wanting to pick up important facts in a short...
Be Realistic• Marketing your experiences is one thing, embellishing them tothe point of falsehood is another• Stay honest ...
Be Confident• You have a vast amount of valuable experiences; the key is learninghow to market those experiences to potent...
Resources• USF Veteran Services: http://www.veterans.usf.edu/index.asp• USF Career Center: http://www.career.usf.edu/• USF...
References• Enelow, W.S. & Kursmark, L.M. (2010). Expert Resumes for Military toCivilian Transitions. Indianapolis, IN: JI...
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Key Strategies for Writing a Military-to-Civilian Resume

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Tips and strategies for developing a resume by translating military experience into civilian terms in order to more successfully transition into the civilian workforce.

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  • Introduce Self, Write name and email on whiteboard
  • TAD PGS Survey: 78% of Resumes downplay or do not list accomplishments55% lack visual impact36% lack objective, focus29% list irrelevant data
  • Jonathan.Storytelling exercise
  • Jonathan.“Managed” too much. Describe what you “managed” or many people you “led”-Supervised-Demonstrated-Facilitated-Directed
  • Jonathanwww.careerinfonet.org/moc/
  • JonathanTypical examples in these fields.Research your chosen career field and learn the types of keywords, “buzzwords” and phrases that hiring personnel use and look for in a resume
  • From www.employflorida.com/vosnet/Default.aspxEmploy Florida Marketplace, which has a sub-site: Employ Florida Vets
  • Don’t know what could be a big thing?All Aspects? What does that mean? Clarify & expand. What may seem simple could actually be a big deal.
  • To get you the interview!!!Career Center has available resources.
  • JonathanExample of a poor resume, look through good examples.Keep it simple, don’t get crazy w/ bold, italics, fill, size, caps, etc. Their v. They’re v. ThereSpell check doesn’t always catch all mistakes.
  • Stay Honest
  • Jonathan
  • Key Strategies for Writing a Military-to-Civilian Resume

    1. 1. Key Strategies for Writing aMilitary-to-Civilian ResumeHow to make your resume more competitive whentransitioning into the civilian workforceDream. Plan. Achieve.SVC 2088 813-974-2171 Mon-Fri: 8-5 www.career.usf.edu
    2. 2. Common problems withmilitary-to-civilian resumesidentified by employers• Overuse of military jargon and abbreviations• Tendency to downplay achievements because of team-orientation• Group training & deployments separated on resume –gives off a “job hopper” feel• Lack of focus/direction, unorganized(Mian, 2012)
    3. 3. Employer misconceptions aboutVeteran applicants• Veterans are inflexible, unable to adapt• Lack innovation/creativity• Lack of openness to other cultures; appreciation of diversityNeed to address these misconceptions:• Need for flexibility/adaptation crucial; situation, assignments,training could change with short notice• Military personnel are trained to be problem solvers, ability toperform under pressure• Deployments to various locations in the world provide moreexposure to other cultures than the average citizen; Militaryhas history of inclusion and diversity appreciation(Mian, 2012)
    4. 4. Know who you are and howyou want to be perceived• Explore who you are• Identify your career interests, goals and objectives• USF Career Center offers self-assessments and career counselingactivities to help identify these• Review your professional development during your militarycareer: Job titles, duties, tasks.• What did you do in the military? Review your performanceevaluations, training records, award and decoration nominations• Use online military-to-civilian translators to identify transferableskills• Tie in what you have done to your career objectives• Highlight relevant skills and experiences to showcase yourqualifications for the position you are seeking• Use civilian terms to describe skills and experiences• Identifying your qualifications with your career interests willhelp give your resume clear direction and focus(Enelow & Kursmark, 2010)
    5. 5. Sell it, Don’t tell itTelling It• Describes features• Tells what and how• Details activities• Focuses on past activitieswithout any context onimpact of activities“Managed personnel and equipmentduring 6-month overseas deployment”Selling It• Describes benefits• States why the “what” and “how”are important• Includes results, details• Explains benefits of what you didand how they impact country,branch of service, unit,community, etc.“Directed a team of 45 electricians,machinists, and mechanics and maintainedmore than $30 million in equipmentthroughout an arduous 6-month overseasdeployment. Achieved/maintained 100%inventory accuracy”(Enelow & Kursmark, 2010, p. 7)
    6. 6. Key Words• Identify key words and phrases that are specific to the civiliancareer/job you are seeking• Recruiters will understand the language and recognize yourknowledge in the field• Integrate these keywords and phrases in describing yourexperiences, to relate your qualifications to your career goals• Try online military-to-civilian translators to ensure you are usingterms used in the civilian workforce, rather than militarylanguage: “Led Troops” = “Managed people”• Review job postings to which you are applying to find out whatkey words are being used in their job descriptions; incorporatethese into your resume if applicable(Enelow & Kursmark, 2010)
    7. 7. Example of Military to CivilianOccupation Translator
    8. 8. Examples of Keywords• Operations Management:• Production planning; scheduling; materials management; inventory control;quality; process engineering; robotics; systems automation; integratedlogistics; product specifications; project management• Training:• Needs assessment; instructional programming; training program design;testing and evaluation; public speaking; instructional materials design;seminar planning; resource selection• Aircraft Maintenance:• Aircraft electronic systems; fuel handling; hydraulics and braking systems;fixed-wing and rotary; airframe; pyrotechnical equipment; preventivemaintenance• Law Enforcement:• Homeland security; emergency response; interrogation; investigation;patrol; criminal justice; search and rescue; suspect apprehension; securityprocedures; inspections(Enelow & Kursmark, 2010, p. 7)
    9. 9. Sample of Job Posting Key Words← Specific Knowledge, Skills and Abilities are listed← Action Verbs used to describe requirements← Technical Skills listed in requirementsExamplesofwhattolookforinajobpostingthatyoucanutilizeinyourresume
    10. 10. Focus on the big things• Program implementation, special projects, cost savings, efficiencyand productivity evaluation, team performance• Save smaller tasks/responsibilities for the interview• Demonstrate your job function describing achievements. Example:“Responsible for all aspects of housing and welfare at the base level”Change to:“Led a team of 35 responsible for all aspects of housing and welfare for2,000 soldiers and more than 4,000 family members at Fort Dix, NewJersey. Fully accountable for more than $30 million in assets, a $10million annual operating budget, and a series of innovative programsto enhance soldier/family morale and retention within the ArmedForces. Achieved retention rates 12% higher than the nationwide normduring a period of massive reduction in force”(Enelow & Kursmark, 2010, p. 11)
    11. 11. Purpose of the Resume• To get you the interview; From there it can guide/direct theinterviewer’s questions• Feature your key accomplishments and qualifiersprominently• Focus on skills needed for new profession• Keep it organized and readable(Enelow & Kursmark, 2010)
    12. 12. Structured resumes reduce confusion• Recruiters scan through resumes quickly,wanting to pick up important facts in a shortamount of time• Stay consistent with placement of job titles,organization names and dates of employment• Use clearly defined sections with headings andsubheadings• Watch for grammar and redundancies!(Enelow & Kursmark, 2010)
    13. 13. Be Realistic• Marketing your experiences is one thing, embellishing them tothe point of falsehood is another• Stay honest with your experience utilizing real facts to supportthem, and describing them with strong, descriptive terms• The truth is in the details.Think about:- The challenge/problem you faced- What steps you took to solve the problem(s) or overcomechallenges?- What was the outcome/results of your actions?- Why is this outcome valuable?Don’t stretch the truth too far and result in a fabricated resume(Enelow & Kursmark, 2010)(Lord, 2012)
    14. 14. Be Confident• You have a vast amount of valuable experiences; the key is learninghow to market those experiences to potential employers• Keep aware of resources available to you, such as the manyworkshops available from the Career Center on resume writing,interview tips, networking strategies• Research resources on services targeted to veterans: military-to-civilian transition assistance programs, job search engines, militaryfriendly companies(Enelow & Kursmark, 2010)
    15. 15. Resources• USF Veteran Services: http://www.veterans.usf.edu/index.asp• USF Career Center: http://www.career.usf.edu/• USF Libraries Job Shop: http://lib.usf.edu/job-shop/• Military to Civilian Occupation Translator: http://www.acinet.org/moc/• Skills Profiler: http://www.careerinfonet.org/skills/default.aspx• My Next Move (from the Occupation Information Network):http://www.mynextmove.org/vets/• US Department of Labor – Employment and Training Administration:http://www.doleta.gov/• Real Warriors Campaign: http://www.realwarriors.net/• Department of Veteran Affairs Vet Center: http://www.vetcenter.va.gov/• Student Veterans of America: http://www.studentveterans.org• Careers for the Transitioning Military: http://www.taonline.com/• GI Jobs: http://www.gijobs.com/• TurboTAP – Transition Assistance Program: http://www.turbotap.org/register.tpp• Vetjobs: http://www.vetjobs.com/• Hire Heroes USA: http://www.hireheroesusa.org/• Military.com Job Search: http://www.military.com/veteran-jobs• USA Jobs (Government Jobs): https://www.usajobs.gov/• Hire Patriots: http://www.hirepatriots.com/• Civilian Jobs: http://www.civilianjobs.com/
    16. 16. References• Enelow, W.S. & Kursmark, L.M. (2010). Expert Resumes for Military toCivilian Transitions. Indianapolis, IN: JIST Works• Lord, J.U. (2012). Your Military to Civilian Career Change Resume,EzineArticles.com. Retrieved from: http://ezinearticles.com/?Your-Military-to-Civilian-Career-Change-Resume&id=7110737• Hay, M.T., Rorrer, L.H., Rivera, J.R., Krannich, R. & Krannich, C. (2006).Military Transition to Civilian Success. Manassas Park, VA: ImpactPublications• Mian, M. Z. (2011). Hiring Heroes: Employer perceptions, preferences,and hiring practices related to U.S. Military Personnel, Apollo ResearchInstitute. Retrieved from:http://apolloresearchinstitute.com/sites/default/files/hiring_heroes_report_final.pdf• Real Warriors Campaign (2012). Translating Military Experience toCivilian Employment, Real Warriors Campaign. Retrieved from:http://www.realwarriors.net/veterans/treatment/civilianresume.php

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