ESOL: Repeating History? -Throughout nineteenth century, the number of immigrant children to the U.S. increased -They esta...
Fears by communities: <ul><li>Some community leaders feared the immigrants would manifest primary allegiances to the count...
Italian American immigrants <ul><li>By 1904, over 180,000 Italians were immigrating to the U. S. each year </li></ul><ul><...
Who hasn’t seen  Scarface  or  Sopranos?
Eroding biases against Italian Americans <ul><li>The eventual achievements of talented Italian Americans, such as New York...
The German immigrants <ul><li>-Numerous German immigrants settled in the U.S. during 1800’s </li></ul><ul><li>they placed ...
German schools (continued) <ul><li>German schools flourished throughout the Midwest </li></ul><ul><li>During World War I, ...
No official language! <ul><li>Please note: the United States of America does not have an  official language </li></ul><ul>...
The 21 Century Immigrants <ul><li>Latinos </li></ul><ul><li>Asian Pacific </li></ul>
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Emil Pulido on ESOL

414 views

Published on

A brief history of English as a Second Language in the United States of America.

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
414
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Emil Pulido on ESOL

  1. 1. ESOL: Repeating History? -Throughout nineteenth century, the number of immigrant children to the U.S. increased -They established special immigrant classes in which instructors employed the student’s primary language -Sometimes called “steamer classes”, the immigrant classes were set up in large cities along Atlantic coast
  2. 2. Fears by communities: <ul><li>Some community leaders feared the immigrants would manifest primary allegiances to the countries they had recently left </li></ul><ul><li>Feared that Italian Americans would reduce the genetic purity of American society </li></ul>
  3. 3. Italian American immigrants <ul><li>By 1904, over 180,000 Italians were immigrating to the U. S. each year </li></ul><ul><li>Extensive newspaper reporting about Al Capone and other Italian American gangsters fostered negative biases </li></ul><ul><li>Films that depicted Italian Americans as crime lords further reinforced negative biases </li></ul>
  4. 4. Who hasn’t seen Scarface or Sopranos?
  5. 5. Eroding biases against Italian Americans <ul><li>The eventual achievements of talented Italian Americans, such as New York City’s Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia countered anti-Italian American bias </li></ul><ul><li>The popularity of Italian American entertainers was another factor that helped reduce anti-Italian American bias </li></ul>
  6. 6. The German immigrants <ul><li>-Numerous German immigrants settled in the U.S. during 1800’s </li></ul><ul><li>they placed a high priority on education </li></ul><ul><li>Their teachers’ credentials often exceeded those of teachers in American schools </li></ul><ul><li>Children in German schools relied on books written in German, and spoke German during the school day </li></ul>
  7. 7. German schools (continued) <ul><li>German schools flourished throughout the Midwest </li></ul><ul><li>During World War I, the German schools converted to English-based instructions </li></ul>
  8. 8. No official language! <ul><li>Please note: the United States of America does not have an official language </li></ul><ul><li>English is the most popular but it is not official </li></ul><ul><li>28 states have made it their official language, but it yet has to go to the Supreme Court </li></ul>
  9. 9. The 21 Century Immigrants <ul><li>Latinos </li></ul><ul><li>Asian Pacific </li></ul>

×