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GUSASpotlight_AnniversaryEdition_November2015

  1. 1. Celebrating Service to Philanthropy The year 2015 is one of triple celebration in the philanthropy arena, as three milestones are being marked: the 80th anniversary of The Giving Institute, publication of the 60th consecutive edition of Giving USA, and the news from Giving USA 2015 that estimated charitable giving by Americans reached an all-time record of $358.38 billion in 2014! One way we are celebrating is by publishing this special edition of Spotlight, which showcases not only the inter- twined histories of The Giving Institute and Giving USA, but the role each has played in America’s philanthropic sector—both historically and today. Quite simply, as more than one leader in the field has stated, you couldn’t have one without the other. 1935—A Pivotal Year for Beer, Board Games, Baseball—and Fundraising It all began in 1935. That was when Americans celebrated the introduction of canned beer, spent hours playing the board game Monopoly and for the first time ever, were able to enjoy America’s pastime—professional baseball—at night. In quieter fashion, another innovation also came into being—the American Association of Fund-Raising Counsel (renamed The Giving Institute in 2005). A trade associa- tion first composed of eight elite firms, it sought to enhance professionalism and create high standards for the largely unregulated area of professional fundraising. Members of the fledgling organization paid $50 in annual dues ($869.77 in 2015 dollars) to promote this effort. Among its early achievements and contributions to the fundraising field were structure and its Code of Ethics. The Giving Institute championed the development of widely accepted standards of professional conduct, helped to fund the start-up of the United Way, and worked with New York’s legislature to develop and enact the Charity Registration Act, which became the Giving USA Spotlight 1959 Sputnik increases importance of philanthropic support for research 1956 Giving to religion captures nearly 50% of all donations 1957 First usage of "venture philanthropy" 1957 Increasing use of foundations in corporate philanthropy 1956 New Jersey court clarifies the right of corporations to give 1956-60 Rising interest in the role of corporate donations 1956 Giving USA is published for the first time by the American Association of Fundraising Counsel Highlights from 60 years of Giving USA GIVING INDUSTRY POLITICAL INFLUENCES SOCIAL INFLUENCES RECEIVING MILESTONES GIVING MILESTONES 60th ANNIVERSARY 1960 First of several years where giving to religion "did not increase in greater proportion than population" 1960 Increasing support for cultural projects 1962-64 Rise of foundation giving with focus on education 1964 First reported mega-gift: $10 million bequest to University of Illinois 1965 Corporate philanthropy now seen as a business strategy 1965 Ford Foundation provides $85 million for American symphony orchestras 1965 President Johnson announces the National Endowment for the Arts 1965 Philanthropy begins to focus on environmental issues Celebrating Service to Philanthropy: 80 years of The Giving Institute and 60th edition of Giving USA
  2. 2. 2  Giving USA Spotlight November 2015 Celebrating Service to Philanthropy basis for a nationwide model. Its member firms have helped charitable organizations raise billions of dollars and provided invaluable counsel to philanthropic institutions. Like-minded People doing Like-minded Work Today, The Giving Institute’s 46 member firms, who meet rigorous standards and complete an extensive interview process prior to being accepted, are profes- sionally and geographically diverse, “a collection of like- minded business owners doing good work and trying to make the world a better place,” said Nancy Raybin, a former chair of both The Giving Institute and Giving USA Foundation. Insight from The Giving Institute’s experts is held in high regard. Representatives from the organization are sought whenever clarity on the state of philanthropy is needed, including by whomever is occupying the White House and Congressional committees. Media seek out experts from the Foundation and Institute frequently as a source for stories related to philanthropy or charitable giving trends and patterns. Other related associations and groups often contact the group about becoming partners because they recognize the value of The Giving Institute name. A Public Service that Serves the Sector— and Garners Headlines that Prove it Media attention for each year’s release of Giving USA is widespread and eagerly anticipated. Coverage comes from virtually every outlet one could name, from the Chronicle of Philanthropy to NPR; from the Wall Street Journal to the New York Times; from thousands of news- papers, radio stations and websites that carry stories by the Associated Press to USA Today. In short, when we announce how much Americans donate to charity, it’s big news and a big deal. One of the sector’s most respected leaders, Andrew Watt, FlnstF, president and CEO of the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP), said that “the histories of AFP and The Giving Institute are closely intertwined, with some of the members of the Institute playing a part in the creation and development of our association. The Institute’s role in setting best practices and ethical stan- dards has made an indelible impact on the evolution of our profession, and we’ve been glad to call the Institute both a friend and a partner for many years.” 1966 New attention on health with the introduction of Medicare and Medicaid 1968 Vietnamese refugees attract attention to international giving 1969 Foundations increasingly seen as a source of innovation for solving social ills 1966-68 Nonprofits increasingly funded by government during "War on Poverty" prompt debate of private funding for public services 1969 Tax Reform Act defines giving requirements for foundations 1970 A rapidly declining economy halts many philanthropic campaigns in the first half of the year 1970 total giving $21.04B THE RISE OF TOTAL GIVING 1970-79 Rise of bequest giving 1973-75 Inflation-adjusted giving declines an average of 3.1% 1970-74 Campus protests, an unpopular war, and a rapidly declining economy impact philanthropy 1974-76 Nonprofits navigate increased demand and decreased government support 1970 total giving $21.04B As early as the 1940s, the Association was charting giving in America. By hand. On graph paper.
  3. 3. 3  Giving USA Spotlight November 2015 Celebrating Service to Philanthropy Embracing the future to better serve philanthropy also keeps best of the past When you ask Giving Institute Chair Jeffrey Byrne about what the future holds for the organization and the way its members serve the philanthropic sector, he paints a bright picture. “I’m really excited about the future,” he said. “When we started welcoming soft- ware and technology companies as mem- bers, we started to evolve as an associa- tion—these allied organizations are part of [professional fundraising’s] future and offer a new perspective on our country’s philanthropic culture that we can learn from.” The latest apps and software aren’t replacing traditional relationship-building that goes on between charitable organiza- tions and donors, Byrne said; not at all. Instead, technology complements these relationships in ways that would have been unimaginable at the founding of The Giving Institute 80 years ago. Institute members often cite the collegial- ity and knowledge-sharing fostered by the group as key benefits to belonging. When you combine experts from the realm of fundraising consulting with peers from the software and technology world, the opportunities for professional growth, business development and knowledge expand by leaps and bounds, Byrne said. “The tech firms can both learn from and help our clients,” Byrne said; in return, member organizations can better advise charitable organizations about how to adopt appropriate technology to reach donors. Byrne feels so strongly about its importance, he added that ignoring technology or refusing to embrace it could be considered akin to committing “fundraising malpractice.” Byrne wants to make sure the Institute’s member organizations avoid that fate, and one of his two main goals as chair addresses the issue. First and foremost, he said, is promoting what The Giving Institute does to provide member organizations the tools necessary to do a better job for their clients. Including technology and other allied organizations under The Giving Institute umbrella is one way the association is addressing that need. He phrased the second goal in the form of a question: “How can The Giving Institute help us better our own companies?” That goal encompasses benefits inherent to membership in an industry association, like providing opportunities that keep organizations at the top of their field, as well as help improve the bottom line. Byrne added that “everything I’m going to do over my term as chair will relate to those two goals.” While change and innovation are impor- tant to not only sustain but expand the organization, so is maintaining the code of ethics developed 80 years ago—the code that is the bedrock of The Giving Institute, Byrne said. Every current and prospective member organization agrees to adhere to it, just like all the member organizations who came before. That code, he added, “bar none, is the most stringent in the field, and has been for 80 years. Isn’t that a great legacy for all fundraisers?” Looking beyond the two years he will spend at the helm, Byrne said “I think The Giving Institute is going to continue to evolve. While our mission and vision will always appeal to organizations providing fundraising counsel, they will also attract more technology firms related to philan- thropy, and that’s an exciting prospect.” 1980 total giving $48.63B 1977 Deferred-giving vehicles, a precursor to donor-advised funds, created 1978 Increasing discussion of African-American philanthropy 1976 Bicentennial celebrations receive significant gifts 1980 Increasing focus on global giving due to refugee resettlement, Italian earthquake, and famine in Somalia 1975-79 Continued political turmoil, energy crisis, and high unemployment shape philanthropy 1980 total giving $48.63B 1981 President Reagan lowers top tax bracket to 50% in the Economic Recovery Tax Act of 1981 1985 Nonprofits struggle to provide services as Gramm-Rudman Act cuts public support as tax rates decrease 1982-87 Giving to religion rebounds, rising from 45% of giving in 1981 to 53% of giving in 1987 1985 The AAFRC Trust for Philanthropy established as a 501(c)3 to support education and research about philanthropy 1982 Charitable Contributions Legislation allows non-itemizers to deduct charitable gifts 1984 Fundraising is increasingly competitive and professionalized 1985 Rise of celebrity-focused philanthropy as Live Aid and Farm Aid raise >$100 million each Jeffrey Byrne, Chair of The Giving Institute
  4. 4. 4  Giving USA Spotlight November 2015 Celebrating Service to Philanthropy Visionary Leaders Expand Giving USA’s Horizons The formation of Giving USA Foundation in 1985 was spurred by forward-looking association leaders Arthur Raybin, John Grenzebach and Charles Lawson. They envisioned opportunities for expanding funding from outside the membership, as well as broadening the scope of what was offered to the philanthropic sector that would continue to advance the research, education and public understanding of charitable giving. Another leader from that era, Maurice Gurin, went a step further, funding an endowment that allows the Institute to host forums from time to time designed to stimulate dialogue, debate, research and education within philanthropy. The November 2015 Gurin Forum featured an expert panel discussing the future of donor- advised funds and their impact on the sector. 1989 Public awareness of the gap between rich and poor demonstrates role of philanthropy to solve societal needs 1986-90 Charitable Contributions Law phases out charitable deductions for non-itemizers 1987 The Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) is made permanent 1987 Charitable support (especially from foundations) for AIDS-related programs makes headlines 1988 Fortune magazine notes that the poor tend to be more generous than the rich; a claim later substantiated through research 1988 Corporate giving to pre-college institutions heightens 1988 Debut of The Chronicle of Philanthropy Giving USA Grows into Role as Seminal Report on Charitable Donations The creation of a publication that would report on the state of philan- thropy was a natural offshoot of The Giving Institute’s work and vision. As early as 1940, it was issuing snap- shots of charitable giving, such as donations made to America’s com- munity chests. In 1956, it published the first of what currently numbers 60 editions. Giving USA, Facts about Philanthropy, projected that 1955 giv- ing would total more than $6 billion, once tax data for that year became available (today, 1955 giving is estimated to have totaled $7.14 billion). The longest-running annual report of its kind, Giving USA is considered the foremost publication on philanthropy in the United States. To those who work in this sector, as well as anyone studying America’s economy and the variablescontributingtoit,GivingUSAisavitalresource. The first 45 editions of Giving USA were researched and written by in-house staff; since Giving USA’s 2001 report, the research and writing have been conducted by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Of the groups responsible for its publication, Dr. Amir Pasic, the School’s Eugene R. Tempel Dean, said that “these two organizations have long been leaders in strengthening data that illuminates our national under- standing of philanthropy. The Giving Institute’s fore- sight in recognizing the value of underpinning profes- sional practice with objective, reliable data led it to pio- neer one of the first comprehensive research projects in philanthropy, the Giving USA report.” The three visionary association leaders who formed Giving USA Foundation, at its official incorporation in 1985: Arthur Raybin, John Grenzebach and Charles Lawson. The first edition of Giving USA, published in 1956. 1990 total giving $98.48B 1995 total giving $123.10B 1993 Interest in women as donors follows Wellesley College's successful capital campaign 1991 Giving hits $100 billion 1991 United Way loses its status as primary collector and distributor of Combined Federal Campaign 1991 Giving to environment/animals and introduced into Giving USA 1993 Donor Bill of Rights established 1994 university-wide campaign, the largest in higher education ($2.1 billion) 1993 New accounting standards issued for statements
  5. 5. 5  Giving USA Spotlight November 2015 Celebrating Service to Philanthropy 1999 First study to mention giving by "GLBT" (LGBTQ) community 1998 Cause-related marketing campaigns and in-kind gifts of pharmaceuticals make headlines 1998 Social Venture Partners established 1999 CECP is founded, and guidelines for corporate citizenship are formalized 1996 Charitable choice legislation removes some barriers to government funding of programs run by religious charities 1996 Bill Gates gives his first multi-million dollar gift; $15 million to Harvard University 2000 Religion continues to receive the most, although a declining share of all giving 1997 Mega-gifts: Ted Turner pledges $1 billion to United Nations; George Soros gives $500 million to Russian programs 1997 Bill and Melinda Gates announce they have established a foundation 1996-99 Giving to religion begins sharp decline 2005 total giving $292.43B2001 The White House Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives (OFBCI) is created 2002 The term "e-philanthropy" appears 2000 Religion continues to receive the most, although a declining share of all giving 2001 Americans give almost $2 billion to support 9/11 recovery 2004 Joan Kroc, widow of McDonald’s founder Ray Kroc, leaves one of the largest gifts ever – $1.5 billion to The Salvation Army 2002 Giving by direct mail declines as online giving grows Seven Decades, Three Milestones—and $358.38 Billion With 2015 marking significant milestones in the history of Giving USA, Giving USA Foundation Chair W. Keith Curtis recently took time to reflect on many aspects of its importance and place across the philanthropic sector and American society as a whole. “In a year where we are celebrating Giving USA’s 60th anniversary and the 80th anniversary of The Giving Institute, our 2015 edition reported an all-time record in charitable giving by Americans— an estimated $358.38 billion,” he said. “That is a remarkable amount and the most in our country’s history, and a mile- stone definitely worth celebrating.” The attention paid when each annual report is issued has earned Giving USA the label of “closely watched” by major media. In addition to the trade, business and consumer press who report its find- ings, the reading audience ranges from fundraising professionals working within and on behalf of our country’s million- plus charitable organizations to the high- est levels of government. “From the start, the backbone of Giving USA has been the integrity of our data. We stood behind that data in 1956, and we stand behind it today,” Curtis said. “I think The Giving Institute leaders who first envisioned the report as a public ser- vice initiative would be quite pleased to know their goal of providing America the facts about charitable giving has contin- ued, without pause, ever since.” One interesting aspect of Giving USA is the fact that its research and affiliated publication costs have always been pri- vately funded. It has never received finan- cial support from any government agency. Originally, The Giving Institute’s member organizations covered the majority of the expense involved. When three visionary Institute leaders formed Giving USA Foundation in 1985 as a separate, charita- ble entity, they saw potential for expand- ing the donor universe, since contribu- tions to it would be tax-deductible, an attractive benefit. What has never changed is that all funding, then, now, and the years in-between, goes toward fulfilling the Foundation’s mission: to advance the research, education and public understanding of philanthropy. Since Giving USA’s reputation as the sem- inal report on philanthropy in America has helped attract outside support, Curtis noted another role is that of steward. The chair needs to ensure the report’s legacy remains intact and that all donors feel appreciated for their contributions. He added that “some of our benefactors have supported us for decades, and each chair must continue the good work our predecessors did to nurture those long- standing relationships and acknowledge their gifts in a meaningful way.” From the start, Giving USA has been viewed as a public trust—there was no other mechanism in place at the time to measure charitable giving in America. Through name changes, different gover- nance structures and varied funding mod- els, that initial vision has never wavered. And having accepted responsibility for continuing the vision, Curtis embraces the opportunities inherent to the title of chair. The Foundation is on a good path, he said, one that has both continued the unprecedented legacy of Giving USA and that will expand its reach into the future. Honoring that past to help inform the future will also enable him to pass the torch of leadership with confidence when the time comes, he said. W. Keith Curtis, Chair of Giving USA Foundation
  6. 6. 6  Giving USA Spotlight November 2015 Celebrating Service to Philanthropy 2010 total giving $288.16B 2007 total giving hits major peak $311.06B 2006 Warren Buffett announces his multi-year plan to donate more than $30 billion to the Gates Foundation 2006-07 Legislation requires all nonprofit organizations to file tax returns and redesigns IRS Form 990 2008 Philanthropic support begins to address climate change 2008 Social entrepreneurship becomes popular and venture philanthropy takes on a new meaning 2009 In-kind donations, less affected by recessions, become more popular among corporations 2008-09 Total giving declines 8.0% (inflation- adjusted) during the heart of the Great Recession $288.16B 2014 total giving hits all time high $358.38B 2012 total giving surpasses pre-recession high $329.32B 2010 Haitian earthquake elevates the role of social media and texting in giving 2011 Largest cash gift ever to a museum: $800 million from the Walton Family Foundation to establish Crystal Bridges 2010 Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett introduce The Giving Pledge 2011 200,000 organizations lose tax-exempt status for failure to file IRS Form 990 2012 The annual #GivingTuesday social media event begins 2013 Total online giving grows by 13.5 percent 2015 Giving USA celebrates its 60th year Acknowledgement All data and comments are drawn from Giving USA as published in the year cited. Amounts are current dollars for the year cited. Timeline developed by Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and Giving USA Foundation™. 2012 Largest gift from an individual: $1.52 billion from Warren Buffet to the Gates Foundation 60 Consecutive Editions: Unmatched Data Integrity and Value to the Sector Giving USA has maintained its rigorous research standards over seven decades; currently, each annual report provides data about: ▶▶ Sources of giving—estimates of charitable donations from American individuals, bequests, foundations and corporations; ▶▶ Uses of giving—estimates of charitable donations made to nine different categories of charitable organizations: —— Religion —— Education —— Human Services —— Foundations —— Health —— Public-Society Benefit —— Arts/Culture/Humanities —— International Affairs —— Environment/Animals 2014 contributions: $358.38 billion by source (in billions of dollars - all figures are rounded) Corporations $17.77 Individuals $258.51 Foundations $53.97 Bequests $28.13 5% 72% 15% 8% 2014 contributions: $358.38 billion by type of recipient organization (in billions of dollars - all figures are rounded) Religion $114.90 Education $54.62 Human services $42.10 Health $30.37 Public-society benefit $26.29 International affairs $15.10 Arts, culture, and humanities $17.23 Environment/animals $10.50 (3%) Gifts to individuals $6.42 (2%) Gifts to foundations $41.62 32% 15% 12% 12% 8% 7% 5% 4%
  7. 7. 7  Giving USA Spotlight November 2015 Celebrating Service to Philanthropy Perhaps of greatest significance, Giving USA has been and will be a critical touchstone on the role philanthro- py plays in society. According to Pasic, “as philanthropy increasingly is called upon to play an even bigger role in the future, there is an even greater need for knowledge that can inform and inspire donors, fundraisers and policymakers, and perhaps inspire more giving as well.” Knowing who donates to charity, and the factors having an impact on giving over time as well as in a given year, are critical data for nonprofits as they contemplate fundraising campaigns. Melissa Brown, associate director of research and man- aging editor of Giving USA from 2001 to 2010, offered insightful perspective to those who question the value of national giving data: “Nearly every new board member believes corporations and foundations give the bulk of charitable dollars. Giving USA proves that at least since 1956, the vast majority of charitable gift dollars are from living donors. Plus, living donors arrange bequests and now determine grants from family foundations. “Giving USA data demonstrate that nonprofits must invest in qualified fundraising staff,” she added. “Board members need knowledgeable experts on their teams to help with the planning, training and asking that leads to long-run financial sustainability.” Another endorsement of Giving USA comes from Carl G. Hamm, deputy director of development and external affairs for the Saint Louis Art Museum: “Each summer, the philanthropic world eagerly anticipates the annual release of Giving USA. Thanks to The Giving Institute, wepractitionerscanshareinthisbenchmarkingmoment together, ponder trends in giving across the charitable sector and contemplate how we might modify our fund- raising programs for success in the year ahead. Over the years, it has become an invaluable resource for the ful- fillment of philanthropic good in our country.” ”GIVING USA HAS BECOME ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT GUIDES TO FUNDRAISING IN ALL OF THE PROFESSION,” SAID AFP’S WATT. “IT’S NOT JUST A LOOK BACK AT THE PAST YEAR, THOUGH THE HISTORICAL DATA IT PROVIDES IS CRUCIAL. IT’S ALSO A PLATFORM FOR IDENTIFYING TRENDS AND PROVIDING ANALYSIS FOR THE YEARS AHEAD. GIVING USA HAS BECOME A ‘MUST-HAVE’ FOR EVERY FUNDRAISER’S SHELF.”
  8. 8. 8  Giving USA Spotlight November 2015 Celebrating Service to Philanthropy Still Here—and Better than Ever— after 80 Years In 2015, beer is not only available in cans, those cans are made of modern materials like titanium (with no church key required). Families can still enjoy a rousing game of Monopoly—but in one of several versions, including digital (passing “Go” still gets you $200, just like in 1935). And, night baseball is still with us, even at Chicago’s Wrigley Field (where the lights came on in 1988 and ivy continues to grace the outfield wall). The point is, classics remain so over time, but evolve as needed while maintaining what made them classic in the first place. Since their start, two different classics, The Giving Institute and the annual Giving USA reports, have evolved as needed so charitable organizations are always provided time-tested ethical fundraising coun- sel, up-to-the-minute research and insight, and other services philanthropies need to succeed. While we don’t know what the world will look like 80 years from now, our hope is that we will not only still be here, but we will still be relevant, still evolving, and still classic. Researched and written at Annual report on philanthropy for the year 2014 GIVING USA 2015 2015
  9. 9. 9  Giving USA Spotlight November 2015 Celebrating Service to Philanthropy Reflections on the Whys and Ways of Membership Henry “Hank” Goldstein, CFRE, who chaired Giving USA Foundation between 2004 and 2005, and now heads Giving Institute member organization The Oram Group, can trace his lineage with both groups to the early 1950s, when Harold L. Oram hired him as a fundraising consultant. Goldstein said recently that Oram wanted to be a part of what was then the American Association of Fund-Raising Counsel (AAFRC) for more than one reason. Not only did the association represent the highest standards of ethics and profes- sionalism in nonprofit fundraising, he said, Oram felt its member firms were, frankly, an exclusive group who could open doors just by being able to rub elbows with their leaders. As if that weren’t enough, he added, there was an additional appeal: Once you were in, you were in; member firms weren’t required to hew to a specific mindset or bent. In fact, the staff and clients of The Oram Group, he said, were most assuredly differ- ent than one might expect during that era. Goldstein was impressed that The Oram Group had female executives as early as the 1940s, and a female African-American vice president in the ’50s. “Our politics, our clients, our work and our outside interests were—and are—proudly left of center,” he said. “Our staff was, to say the least, really bright and totally loopy. When I came to the firm, three of our 19 employ- ees were in Mensa, and they were the nuttiest of the lot. But AAFRC accepted us and our eccentric staff.” While Harold Oram was at the helm, his namesake firm remained a member, and he even held the post of treasurer in the 1970s, a job he loved, according to Goldstein. There was a break in member- ship, however, after Oram retired in 1978—the staff convinced the firm’s new head, Goldstein, to resign from the AAFRC, since they didn’t share Oram’s passion for the group. But when those dissenters left the firm in the early 1990s, Goldstein promptly re- upped. “I attended my first meeting,” he said, “and truly, they were still discussing the same old stuff.” He saw many of the same faces, still debating the same topics, he said, but in a new context: emerging professionalism, virtual technology, the cost of doing business and the eternal question of how to get the best and bright- est into this noble work. As he recalled it, “Nothing, absolutely  nothing had changed. But everything had.” Visit Hank’s blog, http://orammatters. blogspot.com, for more of his reminisces. Henry “Hank” Goldstein, CFRE, former chair of Giving USA Foundation
  10. 10. 10  Giving USA Spotlight November 2015 Celebrating Service to Philanthropy ‘No Internet? No Problem,’ Recalls Former Giving USA Editor Times and technology have changed since Ann Kaplan began editing Giving USA in 1991.Ofcourse,thatwasbeforetheInternet and the development of NTEE, the official coding system used to categorize non- profit organizations. Compiling Giving USA required a lot of legwork—annually she would take the subway from her office to the U.S. Government Printing Office Bookstore to buy a copy of The Economic Report of the President so she could use some of the tables. That was the quickest way to obtain the information. At that time, surveys of organizations were completed on paper and delivered via postal mail and fax machine. Data from the nonprofit tax form 990 were not yet digitized. As a young researcher, Kaplan dived eagerly into her role, raising awareness among the press, public and policymakers about the state of charitable giving. She attended a meeting at the U.S. Treasury about tax policy and made inroads with the organizers of the White House Council on Philanthropy. Kaplan recalled that “when I needed advice, there was an outpouring of inter- est and support from scholars whose work I had read. So many people were invested in the excellence of Giving USA.” She served as Giving USA’s research director and editor through the 2000 report, and is now director of the Voluntary Support of Education Program at the Council for Aid to Education. Not only has her career remained firmly invested in philanthropy and charitable giving research, she is still part of Giving USA, as a member of its Advisory Council on Methodology. “I continue to research philanthropy and deliver the results to fundraising practi- tioners,” she said. “Today, I enjoy being part of the Giving USA Advisory Council on Methodology. It has been an intellec- tual, professional and social adventure. And the adventure continues.” Ann Kaplan, former editor of Giving USA
  11. 11. 11  Giving USA Spotlight November 2015 Celebrating Service to Philanthropy GIVING INSTITUTE MEMBER FIRMS Abila Alexander Haas The Alford Group Inc. Aly Sterling Philanthropy Arnoult Associates Inc. Arthur Alley Associated Benefactor Group Bentz Whaley Flessner Blackbaud Campbell Company Carlson Fund Raising Carlton Company CCS Fundraising Compton Fundraising Consultants The Covenant Group Cramer Associates The Curtis Group Dini Spheris DonorDrive DonorPerfect DonorSearch Dunham+Company Evans Consulting Group Global Advancement, LLC Graham-Pelton Consulting, Inc. Grenzebach Glier Associates Harris Connect, LLC Heaton Smith Group The Hodge Group Jeffrey Byrne + Associates, Inc. Johnson, Grossnickle Associates KCI-Ketchum Canada, Inc. The Lapin Group Marts Lundy, Inc. The Monument Group Oram Group, Inc. The Phoenix Philanthropy Group Plenty Consulting Prasad Consulting Research Richner Richner, LLC Ruotolo Associates, Inc. SofTrek Sterling Associates Ter Moten Watkins Brandt, LLC Winkler Group The Yunker Group, Inc. GIVING USA FOUNDATION™ OFFICERS W. Keith Curtis, The Curtis Group, Chair Aggie Sweeney, CFRE, Campbell Company, Vice Chair Richard J. Dunham, Dunham+Company, Secretary/Treasurer L. Gregg Carlson, Carlson Fund Raising, Immediate Past Chair GIVING USA FOUNDATION™ DIRECTORS Leo P. Arnoult, CFRE, Arnoult Associates, Inc. Joshua Birkholz, Bentz Whaley Flessner Jeffrey Byrne, Jeffrey Byrne + Associates John Glier, Grenzebach Glier and Associates Ted Grossnickle, Grossnickle + Associates Rachel Hutchisson, Blackbaud Christopher K. Looney, CCS Fundraising Laura MacDonald, Benefactor Group M. Anne Murphy, CFRE, Dini Spheris Sarah Williams, Marts Lundy THE GIVING INSTITUTE OFFICERS Jeffrey Byrne, Jeffrey Byrne + Associates, Inc., Chair Rachel Hutchisson, Blackbaud, 1st Vice Chair Sarah Howard, CFRE, Compton Fundraising Consultants, 2nd Vice Chair Derek Alley, Arthur Alley Associated, Secretary Peter J. Fissinger, CFRE, Campbell Company, Treasurer David H. King, CFRE, Alexander Haas, Immediate Past Chair Written and edited by: Sharon Bond, good dog PR Timeline Infographic by: Benefactor Group GIVING USA Spotlight is published by Giving USA Foundation™ 225 W. Wacker Drive, Suite 650 Chicago, IL 60606-3396 www.givingusa.org ©2015 Giving USA Foundation™ ISSN 0889-3793 Additional, complimentary copies of this publication are available at www.givingusa.org. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher. Email info@givingusa.org for permission.

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