Lic ee.olan andj.kaplan voicelice10382013

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Lic ee.olan andj.kaplan voicelice10382013

  1. 1. Narrative Pedagogy and Dialogic Interactions in a Teacher Preparation Writing Workshop: Self- Study of Practice, Change and Reflection Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida Orlando, Florida USA
  2. 2. Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida Orlando, Florida USA INTRODUCTION As candidates move back and forth between the college classroom and the public school classroom during their teacher training, they are required to master new and occasionally conflicting discourses (Alsup,2006). Reflection on teaching experiences can improve teachers’ learning process and decision-making (Richardson, 1990), strengthen teacher self-efficacy and identity (Urzua& Vasquez, 20080, and produce “more skilled, more capable, and in general better teachers” (Zeichner& Liston, 1996) Research on teacher effectiveness suggests that a strong link exists between critical reflection and effective teaching (Harris, 1998).
  3. 3. Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida Orlando, Florida USA Research Aim This study explores how, if at all, can engagement in dialogic interactions and writing and sharing narratives foster innovative and transformative teaching practices? How can we, teacher educators, provide opportunities for teacher candidates and teachers to self-reflect and critically reflect about their teaching experiences and students?
  4. 4. Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida Orlando, Florida USA Context This paper relies on data collected in a focus group designed to explore teacher candidates and teachers’ perceptions of narratives and dialogic interactions in the context of a ten-day writing workshop at the Atlantic Center for the Arts. Teacher educators engage in a Self-Study during and after their 10-day stay at the Atlantic Center for the Arts.
  5. 5. Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida Orlando, Florida USA Theoretical Framework Narrative pedagogy “The facilitation of an educative journey through which learning takes place in profound encounters, and by engaging in meaning-making and deep dialogue and exchange.”( Goodson & Gill , 2011) Dialogic interactions “At any moment in the development of the dialogue there are immense, boundless masses of forgotten contextual meanings, but at certain moments of dialogues subsequent development along the way they are recalled and invigorated in renewed form (in a new context).”( Bakhtin, 1986) Self-Study Self-study researchers use their experiences as a resource for their research and “problematize their selves in their practice situations” with the goal of reframing their beliefs and/or practice (Feldman, 2002, p. 971).
  6. 6. Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida Orlando, Florida USA Methodology Seidman’s (2005) “Tell a Story” Questioning Technique Participants’ narratives /Teacher educators narratives Elicit details of the lived experiences Reflection on meaning participants attach to narrative Focus group Two Focus groups Subject Area Arts and Sciences
  7. 7. Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida Florida, USA Data Analysis 51 interviews (3 per participant) 153 reflections Data generated four themes that seem significant for understanding participants’ and teacher educators’ perception of narrative pedagogy, dialogic interactions, pedagogical practices and beliefs, and writing instruction. Participants struggle with their teacher perception of power and change Lived experiences influence pedagogical practices and beliefs Values are salient in stories and revisited in teaching practices Challenges of sharing
  8. 8. Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida Orlando, Florida USA Nicole’s Story When I was a little girl, I always pictured myself inspiring students to find their own creativity to become innovators rather than filling children’s minds with facts like filling pails. It is disheartening to see myself slowly shift to focus more on data analysis, to where I now see students as numbers instead of unique souls to be fostered. I do not want to lose the creative fire to stimulate students in our system but would rather reform it to where teachers have the freedom to do so. Although I have found some hope and freedom through the IB programs, I still feel constrained in some ways. It is because of this restraint that over the last year I have been searching for a way out in order to teach the way I know is best for kids. Truth be told, I was actually researching jobs to go back overseas prior to this year’s writing workshop because I am so fed up with the way administrators want us to “educate.” I see our current secondary education system producing hollow drones rather than evolving souls to better humanity.
  9. 9. Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida Orlando, Florida USA Drawing Fostering Dialogue
  10. 10. Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida , Florida USA Nicole’s Critical Reflection Orlando, Even though I am still strengthening my voice and finding ways to be genuine amongst colleagues and students, I know one day I will be able to break through the administrative boundaries that restrain passionate and original teachers who care more about their students than just the skills they are equipped with. The most beneficial activity we did today was going through the process of peer editing. Although, I dreaded the idea of exposing my work to Chuck, it actually helped me take down some of my guard. I found we both genuinely wanted to help each other. The activity gave me the perspective of how my students must feel when they are subjecting their personal work to be critiqued and how important it is for the constructive criticism to be a positive experience. I realized that when I grade my students’ papers I can be very critical and focus a lot on conventions and details, which is really the last thing to look at. Making sure that I see past the grammar mistakes to find the strengths in their voice is crucial if I want them to feel that their writing is important and worth improving before they will feel comfortable in receiving other advice to improve. I know my ardor to reform the education system will push me into a leadership role that will allow me to make the changes I want to see. In fact, I just bought a GRE book in order to pursue a graduate program within the fields of learning education leadership, public policy and community and charter school start-ups. My overall dream would be to find my way into a leadership role to reform education and then start my own NPO international Waldorf inspired or IB school here in the states. Ultimately, awarding scholarships to economically struggling and ESOL families. I have had this dream for a while but was not sure how to initiate it. Now, I feel that I just need to put myself out there, strengthen my weaknesses and take the first steps towards paving this new path.
  11. 11. Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida , Florida USA Teacher Educators’ Inquiry 1) How can we use narrative practices to foster self- reflection, reflexivity, and critical reflection in preservice English teachers? 2) How can we use narrative practices and dialogic interactions to empower preservice teachers’ approaches to equity and teaching in times of change? 3) How can we use narrative practices and dialogic interactions to contribute to meaningful changes and the development of preservice teachers’ professional knowledge?
  12. 12. Dr. Elsie Lindy Olan Dr. Jeffrey Kaplan elsie.olan@ucf.edujeffrey.kaplan@ucf.edu University of Central Florida Orlando, Florida USA Conclusion The pedagogical tools (interviews, narratives and reflections) invite participants to pose questions about their practice, to provide evidence related to those questions, to reflect, to engage in dialogues with other participants, and to share realizations and possible actions.

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