Gifted Educators Conference_ CF RESA, 12, 2010

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  • Yokohama, Japan
  • Gifted Educators Conference_ CF RESA, 12, 2010

    1. 1. Three Rs and Four Cs for Digital Competence<br />Elizabeth D. Holmes<br />December 9, 2010<br />
    2. 2. Global Education Challenges <br /><ul><li>What changes will we see in the job market of 2015?
    3. 3. What skills will students need to thrive in a complex global economy?
    4. 4. How can our gifted educators prepare our students for their futures?
    5. 5. How will students acquire the digital competence needed to be successful in the workplace?</li></ul>Handout: The Three Rs and Four C’s<br />
    6. 6. changes in job market<br />
    7. 7. change<br />As society embraces the tools of the age<br />computersglobalization<br />Agricultural Industrial Information Conceptual<br />knowledge <br />creators <br />factory <br />farmer<br />farmers~craftsmen~manufacturers~white-collar~service~professionals~creators<br />
    8. 8. Technologycan change the nature of work faster thanpeople can change their skills. <br />
    9. 9. The problem is compounded when a nation’s educational system grows out of touch with job market trends. <br />
    10. 10. How the demand for skills has changedEconomy-wide measures of routine and non-routine task input (US)<br />Factory worker<br />Specialized hand work <br />Mean task input as percentiles of the 1960 task distribution<br />Scripts computerized <br />Expert thinking<br />Complex communication<br /> (Levy and Murnane)<br />
    11. 11. Routine Manual Tasks1970 – 2002 Physical tasks that use deductive or inductive rules. <br />
    12. 12. Non-routine Manual Tasks1970 – 1990  Physical tasks that do not follow a set of rules. Requires skills and abilities that a computer cannot carry out. <br />
    13. 13. Routine Cognitive Tasks1970 – 1980 -2002  Mental tasks that are completed by applying deductive or inductive rules.<br />
    14. 14. How the demand for skills has changedEconomy-wide measures of routine and non-routine task input (US)<br />Mean task input as percentiles of the 1960 task distribution<br />The challenge for schools:<br />Identify and teach the skills needed to support job market trends: Requires critical thinking, communication, collaboration, creativity<br />The dilemma of schools:<br />The skills that are easiest to teach and test are also the ones that are easiest to digitize, automate and outsource<br /> (Levy and Murnane)<br />
    15. 15. changes in job market<br />What are the implications for educating gifted students?<br />
    16. 16. …a profound gap…<br />
    17. 17. between <br />the knowledge and skills students learn in school…<br />
    18. 18. …and the skills needed in the global workplace.<br />
    19. 19. Today’s school system faces irrelevance...<br />
    20. 20. unless we bridge the gap…<br />
    21. 21. between how students live…<br />
    22. 22. …and how they learn. <br />
    23. 23. what skills are needed?<br />
    24. 24. The 3 RsReal, Relevant, Rigorous<br />The 4 Cs<br />Critical Thinking<br />Communication<br />Collaboration<br />Creativity<br />
    25. 25. Expert Thinking<br />When a problem can’t be solved by rules, it is necessary to look for other solution methods. Expert Thinking is a collection of specific solution methods that varywith the problem at hand.<br />
    26. 26. computer assisted<br />Case-based Reasoning<br />Pattern Recognition<br />Tasks Requiring Expert Thinking Solving problems for which there are no rule-based solutions. <br />Previous Solutions<br />
    27. 27. Problem: Reduce energy consumption in an old house<br />Looking for Patterns<br />An individual’s ability to make progress on this type of problem is one good indicator of their ability to succeed in today’s economy.<br />Unique Situations<br /><ul><li>Climate
    28. 28. Floorplan
    29. 29. Occupant habits</li></ul>Previous Solutions<br /><ul><li>Windows?
    30. 30. Insulation?
    31. 31. Furnace?</li></li></ul><li>Complex CommunicationThe ability to establish a common understanding of information. In technology-rich environments where information is abundant rapidly changing, this skill is essential.<br />
    32. 32. computer assisted<br />Tasks Requiring Complex CommunicationInteracting with humans to acquire, explain or to persuade others based on information. <br />
    33. 33. Complex Communication in Context<br />Victor Hugo, Les Misérables, 1862<br />
    34. 34. Problem: Interpret and apply key information in appropriate contexts<br />popular media<br />read, write web tools<br />video conferencing<br />chats and discussions<br />social networking<br />social bookmarking<br />digital photosharing<br />Print tool/content resources<br />
    35. 35. Creativity is an essential skill needed to develop and sustain new occupations.<br />
    36. 36. Tasks Requiring CreativityIt is impossible to imagine many of the new occupations that will exist in a decade. But we do know the skills these future occupations will require. <br />
    37. 37. what skills are needed?<br />What are the implications for educating gifted students?<br />
    38. 38. the <br /> fundamental question<br />
    39. 39. For what worldwill today's schools prepare our students? <br />That’s the Way We’ve Always Done It, Ian Jukes<br />
    40. 40. theagricultural age?<br />18th century<br />…shaped our current school schedules<br />
    41. 41. theindustrial age?<br />19th century<br />…shaped our current instructional design<br />
    42. 42. *AT RISK*<br />theinformation age?<br />20th century<br />VOKI<br />…globalization shaped a demand for reform<br />
    43. 43. conceptual age?<br />entertainers<br />musicians<br />artists<br />designers<br />architects<br />engineers<br />scientists<br />finance<br />law<br />healthcare<br />economic function is to create new ideas, new technology, or new content<br />educators<br />creative class<br />
    44. 44. preparing for expert thinking<br />
    45. 45. unwired<br />
    46. 46. wired<br />transformers<br />
    47. 47. coronation<br />…empowered but not powerful<br />Harold Edgarton, Stop-motion photography 1947<br />
    48. 48. information and media literacy<br />chaos<br />systems thinking<br />chaos<br />visual literacy<br />project planning and development<br />communication skills<br />problem solving<br />flexibility and adaptability<br />creating and innovating<br />technology<br />information<br />critical thinking<br />ethical behavior<br />productivity and accountability<br />initiative and direction<br />interpersonal collaboration skills<br />leadership and responsibility<br />social/personal and cross cultural skills<br />
    49. 49. isolated ~ connected<br />
    50. 50. Communities already exist.. <br />Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Facebook<br />
    51. 51. Integrate 3 R’s<br />Creativity<br />Collaboration<br />Critical Thinking<br />Communication<br />
    52. 52. organize abandonment<br />
    53. 53. wired educators<br />
    54. 54. preparing for expert thinking<br />What are the implications for educating gifted students?<br />
    55. 55. 2007<br />
    56. 56. “Tough Choices or Tough Times” 2006<br />
    57. 57. World market professionals available <br />in a wide range of fields for a fraction of what U.S. professionals charge<br />
    58. 58. Our young adults<br />score at “mediocre” levels on the best<br />international measure of<br />performance<br />Tough Choices or Tough Times<br />
    59. 59. International Outcomes(8th Grade PISA Results in OECD Nations, 2006)<br />Science<br />Finland<br />Canada<br />Japan<br />New Zealand<br />Australia<br />Netherlands<br />Korea<br />Germany<br />United Kingdom<br />Math<br />Finland <br />Korea<br />Netherlands<br />Switzerland<br />Canada<br />Japan<br />New Zealand<br />Belgium<br />Australia<br />U.S. is <br /># 29 /40 <br />top<br />nations<br />U.S. is <br /># 35/40 <br />top<br />nations<br />
    60. 60. Will the world’s employers pick U.S. graduates?<br />only…<br /> 1.) if compete academically<br /> 2.) if exceed in creativity, innovative capacity and ability to learn quickly<br />
    61. 61. Profile of successful workers<br />top academic performance,<br />creative and innovative.<br />able to learn very quickly…<br />Tough Choices or Tough Times<br />
    62. 62. developing student competence<br />
    63. 63. Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development<br />
    64. 64. Use Frameworks and Assessments (PIAAC ) to measure the skills needed in the labor market and estimating those skills’ prevalence in the schools.<br /><ul><li>Literacy
    65. 65. Numeracy
    66. 66. Problem-Solving in Technology Environments
    67. 67. Complex Communication*</li></ul>OECD<br />
    68. 68. workplace needsGAPwhat school deliver<br />
    69. 69. A World of Change – Higher Education<br />Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)<br />Cost per student<br />Graduate supply<br />Tertiary-type A graduation rate <br />
    70. 70. A World of Change – Higher Education<br />Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)<br />Sweden<br />United States<br />Cost per student<br />Finland<br />Graduate supply<br />Tertiary-type A graduation rate <br />
    71. 71. A World of Change – Higher Education<br />Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)<br />Australia<br />Finland<br />United Kingdom<br />Tertiary-type A graduation rate <br />
    72. 72. A World of Change – Higher Education<br />Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)<br />Tertiary-type A graduation rate <br />
    73. 73. A World of Change – Higher Education<br />Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)<br />Tertiary-type A graduation rate <br />
    74. 74. A World of Change – Higher Education<br />Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)<br />Tertiary-type A graduation rate <br />
    75. 75. A World of Change – Higher Education<br />Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)<br />Tertiary-type A graduation rate <br />
    76. 76. A World of Change – Higher Education<br />Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)<br />Tertiary-type A graduation rate <br />
    77. 77. A World of Change – Higher Education<br />Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)<br />United States<br />Sweden<br />Australia<br />United Kingdom<br />Finland<br />Tertiary-type A graduation rate <br />
    78. 78. Singapore, Finland, and South Korea have the top education systems in the world. These nations achieved this by recruiting the top one-third + graduates. <br />Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)<br />
    79. 79. Shanghai Students World Champs on Science, Math, Reading Test<br />Shanghai Students World Champs on Science, Math, Reading Test. U.S. trails much of industrialized world.<br />December 7, 2010 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)<br />
    80. 80. Moving targetsFuture supply of college graduates<br />
    81. 81. U.S. Scores on PISA and PIRLS Have Dropped Since 2000<br />(Program in International Student Assessment, Reading Literacy Study)<br />Math 30th<br />Science 23<br />Reading 15th<br />December 7, 2010 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)<br />
    82. 82. New Context and Expectations<br />Ability to communicate<br />Adaptability to change<br />Ability to work in teams<br />Preparedness to solve problems<br />Ability to analyze and conceptualize<br />Ability to reflect on and improve performance<br />Ability to manage oneself<br />Ability to create, innovate and criticize<br />Ability to engage in learning new things at all times<br />Ability to cross specialist borders<br />China<br />Chris Wardlaw, "Mathematics in Hong Kong/China – Improving on Being First in PISA"<br />
    83. 83. New Context and Expectations<br />Use technology to:<br />Engage learners by and tailoring tasks to needs and interests;<br />Develop a new generation of assessments;<br />Connect teachers with experts/resources;<br />Build access to technology in/out of the classroom; <br />Harness technology to increase district productivity and student achievement.<br />USA<br />2010 National Educational Technology Plan (NETP) Goals <br />
    84. 84. developing student competence<br />What are the implications for educating gifted students?<br />
    85. 85. global project-based learning<br />
    86. 86. References<br />Galinski, E. (2010). Mind in the making. New York: Harper Studio.<br />Levy, F. and Murnane, R. (2004 The New Division of Labor: How Computers are Creating the Next Job Market Princeton University Press.<br />Levy, F. OECD Directorate for Education, Department of Urban Studies and Planning. (2010). How technology changes demands for human skills oecd education working paper (No. 45). Mass: Department of Urban Studies and Planning, MIT.<br />Schleicher, A (2010). Seeing your education system in the prism of international comparisons. Stockholm presentation, May 17. Slideshare.<br />
    87. 87. Photo Credits<br /><ul><li>badjonni'sphotostreamDS' photostream
    88. 88. AZAdam'sphotostream
    89. 89. Thomas Hawk's photostream
    90. 90. horizontal.integration'sphotostream
    91. 91. Will Lion's photostream
    92. 92. Latente囧 Il Bipensiero al Governo'sphotostream
    93. 93. Spitzgogo_CHEN (Nokia 6230i)'s photostream
    94. 94. ®DS' photostream
    95. 95. monsieurlam'sphotostream
    96. 96. kevindooley'sphotostream
    97. 97. simiant'sphotostream
    98. 98. closelyobserved.co m's photostream</li>

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