Documenting sources

1,391 views

Published on

Published in: Travel, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,391
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Documenting sources

  1. 1.  Paraphrase, Citation, and  Quotation by Elizabeth Siler
  2. 2. Before We Begin• Please turn to the CIA World Factbook, which is  available at  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-fact• Use the pull down menu to select the country of  Nauru.• Spend a few minutes looking through all the  information that is available on this country  before we begin.  
  3. 3. Step 1:  SOURCES/ REFERENCES• A source is something that you use to get information from to write  a paper.   • A source can be an article, a blog, a radio broadcast, a  conversation, an email, or many other sources of information.• Do not use Wikipedia as a source, ever.   Its not reliable.• The source we will use in this presentation is the information on  the island of Nauru from the CIA World Factbook.
  4. 4. References• When you use a source, the first thing you should do is  write a good APA-style reference of the source.  • As you write a paper, your reference list will change as  you use/discard sources.  • Use the OWL at Purdue (keywords “OWL” “purdue”  “apa”) to help you write good references.   Click HERE  for the link.
  5. 5. A Reference for Nauru• The CIA World Factbook is somewhat like an  online encyclopedia.  Thus, use the form for an  online encyclopedia, shown here:  http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/10/• REFERENCE:  – Nauru. (2012). In CIA World Factbook. Retrieved  from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the- world-factbook/geos/nr.html
  6. 6. Step 2:  PARAPHRASE• Paraphrase is the substantial rearrangement of a sources words  AND grammar without changing the meaning.• Most of what you write in academic English should be paraphrased.
  7. 7. Overview of Paraphrase• Paraphrase is easy when you do it this way: o Break the source down into simple clauses, each with  a finite (that is "complete") verb phrase. o Change as many of the words in the simple clauses as  you can. o Recombine the simple clauses into new sentences,  each with no more than two or three finite verb  phrases. o Reorder parts of the text.
  8. 8. EXAMPLE:  PARAPHRASE 1SOURCE:  limited natural freshwater resources, roof storage tanks collect rainwater but mostly dependent on a single, aging desalination plant; intensive phosphate mining during the past 90 years - mainly by a UK, Australia, and NZ consortium - has left the central 90% of Nauru a wasteland and threatens limited remaining land resourcesREFERENCE: Nauru. (2012). In CIA World Factbook. Retrieved from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/nr.html
  9. 9. EXAMPLE:   PARAPHRASE 2• Sentence Breakdown (Make sure every sentence  has a complete verb phrase and a clear subject.)    – (Nauru has) limited natural freshwater resources – Roof storage tanks collect rainwater. – (The island is ) mostly dependent on a single, aging  desalination plant (for its water supply);  – Intensive phosphate mining during the past 90 years has left  the central 90% of Nauru a wasteland. – (The mining has been done ) mainly by a UK, Australia, and  NZ consortium – (This mining operation) threatens limited remaining land  resources
  10. 10. EXAMPLE:   PARAPHRASE 3
  11. 11. EXAMPLE:  PARAPHRASE 4• RECOMBINE CLAUSES/ADD CONNECTIONS• People on Nauru use storage tanks on their roofs to collect rain because the island has  very few freshwater resources.   The island gets most of its water supply from an old  desalination plant.  • Scarcity of water is not the only environmental problem.   A consortium from England,  Australia and New Zealand has done extensive phosphate mining on the island.  Only  10% of Nauru has not been destroyed by heavy phosphate mining but is, nevertheless,  in  danger from this mining operation. 
  12. 12. COMPARE PARAPHRASE ORIGINAL SOURCE     People on Nauru use storage tanks on their limited natural freshwater resources,  roofs to collect rain because the island has roof storage tanks collect rainwater  very few freshwater resources.   The island but mostly dependent on a single,  gets most of its water supply from an old aging desalination plant; intensive  desalination plant.  phosphate mining during the past 90  Scarcity of water is not the only years - mainly by a UK, Australia,  environmental problem.   A consortium from and NZ consortium - has left the  England, Australia and New Zealand has central 90% of Nauru a wasteland and  done extensive phosphate mining on the threatens limited remaining land  island.  Only 10% of Nauru has not been  destroyed by heavy phosphate mining but is, resources nevertheless,  in danger from this mining  operation. 
  13. 13. STEP 3:   CITE• Cite whenever you paraphrase.   Even if you use your own words, you must cite!• In APA style, use the authors last name and the year date of the  source.   If there is a page number, use that.• If there is no author, use the first three words of the title.  Use  quotations around the words.
  14. 14. Reference/CitationREFERENCE: • Nauru. (2012). In CIA World Factbook.  Retrieved from  https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the- world-factbook/geos/nr.html• CITATION:  (“Nauru,” 2012)
  15. 15. EXAMPLE:   CITATION• People on Nauru use storage tanks on their roofs to collect rain  because the island has very few freshwater resources (“Nauru,”  2012).   The island gets most of its water supply from an old  desalination plant (“Nauru,” 2012).  • Scarcity of water is not the only environmental problem.   A  consortium from England, Australia and New Zealand has done  extensive phosphate mining on the island (“Nauru,” 2012) .  Only  10% of Nauru has not been destroyed by heavy phosphate mining  but is, nevertheless,  in danger from this mining operation  (“Nauru,” 2012). • NOTE:   Citing in English is done paragraph by paragraph.   With each new paragraph have to re-establish the citing that you are doing.• In all cases, you need to cite where the information from a source starts and cite again where it ends to show the way the information is  "framed."
  16. 16. STEP 4:  Quotation• Generally speaking avoid quotation and favor paraphrase.• Keep these basics in mind: o Keep your quotes as small as possible, striving for unusual and  text-specific phrases.  o If something is easily paraphrasable, that is a sign that you  should NOT quote it. o Always quote precisely what the text says. o Integrate quotes with material around the quotes. o Do not start a sentence with a quote.  Instead, introduce,  contextualize, and embed quotes. o Always use quotation marks! 
  17. 17. Source:  Quotationintensive phosphate mining during the past 90 years - mainly by a UK, Australia, and NZ consortium - has left the central 90% of Nauru a wasteland and threatens limited remaining land resources
  18. 18. Quotation Mistake #1• According to information in the CIA World Factbook, “intensive  phosphate mining during the past 90 years - mainly by a UK,  Australia, and NZ consortium - has left the central 90% of Nauru  a wasteland and threatens limited remaining land resources.”• MISTAKE: The passage is too long.  The student quoted too  much. Most of this could be paraphrased. Quotes should be  introduced and contextualized. 
  19. 19. Quotation Mistake #2• According to information in the CIA World  Factbook, long term phosphate mining by an  international consortium “has left 90% of Nauru  a wasteland and threatens limited remaining land  resources.”• MISTAKE:  That is not what the source said.   The source said, “. . . the central 90% of Nauru” .  . .   You must use exactly the same words when  you quote.  Also much of this could be  paraphrased.   
  20. 20. A Good Quotation• The CIA World Factbook calls much of Nauru “a wasteland” because of the devastation caused by a consortium that has done phosphate mining on the island for the past 90 years.
  21. 21. A Word About Slides/Lists

×