Introduction to Critical Thinking

4,281 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
4 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • All in all this is an excellent presentation in terms of logical sequencing and flow.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Fairness is the most difficult part. Often in arguments and discussions so many interpersonal forces come into play that this factor is ignored and an incorrect decision is arrived at.

    The best way to avoid biases in a group situation is to have a good moderator (easier said) and then to have a playful sort of environment where no one wins and no one loses.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Saying that so and so is tall... and then specifying how tall.... this slide is really good !
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Critical thinking is validating new info with knowledge already aquired by comparing, contrasting and challenging the new info with knowledge. It helps in taking decisions which are less likely to have a bad fall out.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,281
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
22
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
210
Comments
4
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Analyzing Comparing and contrasting Classification/definition Determining parts-whole relationships Sequencing Finding reasons and conclusions Uncovering assumptions Evaluation Assessing basic information Determining the reliability of sources Determining the accuracy of sources Well-founded inferences The use of evidence Deduction Decision Making What makes a decision necessary? What are my options? What are the likely consequences of each option? How important are the consequences? Which option is best in light of the consequences? Monitor and review your decision and ask, are there any necessary adjustments? Problem Solving What is the Problem? What Are the Alternatives? What Are the Advantages and/or Disadvantages of Each Alternative? What Is the Solution? How Well Is the Solution Working? Reasoning The type of thinking that uses arguments - reasons in support of conclusions to decide, explain, predict, and persuade.
  • Analyzing (Module 1-7) Comparing and contrasting Classification/definition Determining parts-whole relationships Sequencing Finding reasons and conclusions Uncovering assumptions Evaluation (Module 1-7) Assessing basic information Determining the reliability of sources Determining the accuracy of sources Well-founded inferences The use of evidence Deduction Decision Making (Module 2, 6 & 7) What makes a decision necessary? What are my options? What are the likely consequences of each option? How important are the consequences? Which option is best in light of the consequences? Monitor and review your decision and ask, are there any necessary adjustments? Problem Solving (Module 2 & 7) What is the Problem? What Are the Alternatives? What Are the Advantages and/or Disadvantages of Each Alternative? What Is the Solution? How Well Is the Solution Working? Reasoning (Module 1-7) The type of thinking that uses arguments - reasons in support of conclusions to decide, explain, predict, and persuade.
  • Universal intellectual (Critical) standards are standards which must be applied to thinking whenever one is interested in checking the quality of reasoning about a problem, issue, or situation. To help students learn them, teachers should pose questions which probe student thinking, questions which hold students accountable for their thinking, questions which, through consistent use by the teacher in the classroom, become internalized by students as questions they need to ask themselves. The ultimate goal, then, is for these questions to become infused in the thinking of students, forming part of their inner voice, which then guides them to better and better reasoning. While there are a number of universal standards, the following are the most significant: (Source: http://www.fctl.ucf.edu/tresources/content/Ruland-CriticalThinkingStandards.pdf)
  • Clarity is the gateway standard. If a statement is unclear, we cannot determine whether it is accurate or relevant. In fact, we cannot tell anything about it because we don't yet know what it is saying.
  • A statement can be clear but not accurate, as in “This chicken weighs over 300 pounds."
  • A statement can be both clear and accurate, but not precise, as in “Yao Ming is tall!" (We don't know how Tall Yao Ming is. E.g. Precise = Yao Ming is 2.29 (7-6) meters tall. )
  • A statement can be clear, accurate, and precise, but not relevant to the question at issue. For example, students often think that the amount of effort they put into a course should be used in raising their grade in a course. Often, however, the "effort" does not measure the quality of student learning, and when this is so, effort is irrelevant to their appropriate grade.
  • A statement can be clear, accurate, precise, and relevant, but superficial (that is, lack depth). For example, the statement "Just say No" which is often used to discourage children and teens from using drugs, is clear, accurate, precise, and relevant. Nevertheless, it lacks depth because it treats an extremely complex issue, the pervasive problem of drug use among young people, superficially. It fails to deal with the complexities of the issue.
  • A line of reasoning may be clear accurate, precise, relevant, and deep, but lack breadth (as in an argument from either teacher or student standpoint which gets deeply into an issue, but only recognizes the insights of one side of the question.)
  • When we think, we bring a variety of thoughts together into some order. When the combination of thoughts are mutually supporting and make sense in combination, the thinking is "logical." When the combination is not mutually supporting, is contradictory in some sense, or does not "make sense," the combination is not logical.
  • The reasons are quite complex.
  • The reasons are quite complex.
  • Introduction to Critical Thinking

    1. 1. Module 1:Introduction toCritical Thinking
    2. 2. Question?Why do YOU study for a Degree?
    3. 3. Do You Agree With This Statement? “Some people study all their life and at their death they have learned everything except to THINK” THINK – Francois Domergue Why?
    4. 4. Do You Agree? Why isImagination so Important? I Need input from you!
    5. 5. Why does UNITAR have this course? To help you improve your Thinking Skills HOW TO THINK!
    6. 6. Module 1: Introduction to Critical Thinking1. What is Thinking? 3. What is 2. Types of Thinking Critical Thinking? 7. Characteristics of a Critical Thinker 4. Critical Thinking Standards 6. Barriers to 5. Benefits of Critical Thinking Critical Thinking
    7. 7. 1.1 What is Thinking? Why doesn’t SHE like me? Why doesn’t HE like me?As you start asking questions and seek answers, you are in fact thinking.
    8. 8. 1.1 What is Thinking? Thinking is a purposeful, organized cognitive process that we use to make sense of our world.
    9. 9. 1.2 Types of Thinking • Analyzing • Evaluating Problem Solving • Reasoning Decision Making New Ideas Critical Left Right CreativeThinking Thinking
    10. 10. 1.3 What is Critical Thinking? WARNING: THIS MAN IS NOT THINKING CRITICALLY!! Source: http://profmulder.home.att.net/introwhatis.htm
    11. 11. 1.3 What is Critical Thinking? (2) “Critical thinking consists of a mental process of analyzing or evaluating information, particularly statements or propositions that people have offered as true. It forms a process of reflecting upon the meaning of statements, examining the offered evidence and reasoning, and forming judgments about the facts.” – Wikipedia “Critical thinking is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication, as a guide to belief and action. “ - Michael Scriven & Richard Paul More Definitions…
    12. 12. 1.3 What is Critical Thinking? (3)Critical Thinking is the general term given to a wide range of cognitive and intellectual skills needed to: Effectively identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments. Discover and overcome personal prejudices and biases. Formulate and present convincing reasons in support of conclusions. Make reasonable, intelligent decisions about what to believe and what to do.
    13. 13. 1.3 What is Critical Thinking? (4) Don’t need to • Analyzing memorize definitions! Just • Evaluating Problem Solving understand and • Reasoning Decision Making practice the core critical thinking skills emphasized in this course. Critical Left RightThinking
    14. 14. 1.3 What is Critical Thinking? (5) Reasoning Analyzing CRITICAL Evaluating THINKING SKILLS Decision Making Problem Solving
    15. 15. 1.4 Critical Thinking Standards (CTS)The most significant critical (intellectual) thinking standards: Clarity Accuracy Precision Relevance Depth Breadth Logic Fairness
    16. 16. 1.4 CTS - Clarity Could you elaborate further on that point? Could you express that point in another way? Could you give me an illustration? Could you give me an example? Help you I can, yes. Clarity is the gateway standard Source: http://www.fctl.ucf.edu/tresources/content/Ruland-CriticalThinkingStandards.pdf
    17. 17. 1.4 CTS – Accuracy Is that really true? How could we check that? How could we find out if that is true? This chicken weighs over 300 pounds. Powerful you have become, the dark side I sense in you. A statement can be clear but not accurate Source: http://www.fctl.ucf.edu/tresources/content/Ruland-CriticalThinkingStandards.pdf
    18. 18. 1.4 CTS – Precision Could you give more details? Could you be more specific? Yao Ming is TALL! Size matter s not. A statement can be both clear and accurate, but not precise Source: http://www.fctl.ucf.edu/tresources/content/Ruland-CriticalThinkingStandards.pdf
    19. 19. 1.4 CTS – Relevance How is that connected to the question? How does that bear on the issue? I studied hard all semester, therefore I should get A+. You must unlearn what you have learned. A statement can be clear, accurate, and precise, but not relevant to the question at issue. Source: http://www.fctl.ucf.edu/tresources/content/Ruland-CriticalThinkingStandards.pdf
    20. 20. 1.4 CTS – Depth How does your answer address the complexities in the question? How are you taking into account the problems in the question? Is that dealing with the most significant factors? Grave danger you are in. Impatient you are. A statement can be clear, accurate, precise, and relevant, but superficial. Source: http://www.fctl.ucf.edu/tresources/content/Ruland-CriticalThinkingStandards.pdf
    21. 21. 1.4 CTS – Breadth Do we need to consider another point of view? Is there another way to look at this question? What would this look like from a conservative standpoint? What would this look like from the point of view of...? Headache!! You got 0 marks for ! “Participation”, because you didn’t participate in the class discussion at all. That is why you fail. A line of reasoning may be clear, accurate, precise, relevant, and deep, but lack breadth. Source: http://www.fctl.ucf.edu/tresources/content/Ruland-CriticalThinkingStandards.pdf
    22. 22. 1.4 CTS – Logic Does this really make sense? Does that follow from what you said? How does that follow? But before you implied this and now you are saying that; how can both be true?Superman sees through anything.Superman sees through walls.Superman sees through You. May the force be with you. When the combination of thoughts are mutually supporting and make sense in combination, the thinking is "logical.“ Source: http://www.fctl.ucf.edu/tresources/content/Ruland-CriticalThinkingStandards.pdf
    23. 23. 1.4 CTS – FairnessCritical thinking demands that our thinking be fair. Open-minded Impartial Free of distorting biases and preconceptions Difficult to achieve, but you must try! Fair-mindedness is an essential attribute of a Critical Thinker. Source: http://www.fctl.ucf.edu/tresources/content/Ruland-CriticalThinkingStandards.pdf
    24. 24. 1.4 CTS – Good Thinking is… CLEAR……….....rather than........UNCLEAR CLEAR ACCURATE…....rather than…….INACCURATE ACCURATE PRECISE……....rather than…….VAGUE PRECISE RELEVANT…….rather than…….IRELEVANT RELEVANT CONSISTENT….rather than……INCONSISTENT CONSISTENT LOGICAL……….rather than……ILLOGICAL LOGICAL COMPLETE……rather than……INCOMPLETE COMPLETE FAIR…………….rather than…....BIASED FAIR Source: http://www.fctl.ucf.edu/tresources/content/Ruland-CriticalThinkingStandards.pdf
    25. 25. 1.5 Benefits of Critical ThinkingExamples: Academic Performance  understand the arguments and beliefs of others  Critically evaluating those arguments and beliefs  Develop and defend ones own well-supported arguments and beliefs. Workplace  Helps us to reflect and get a deeper understanding of our own and others’ decisions  Encourage open-mindedness to change  Aid us in being more analytical in solving problems Daily life  Helps us to avoid making foolish personal decisions.  Promotes an informed and concerned citizenry capable of making good decisions on important social, political and economic issues.  Aids in the development of autonomous thinkers capable of examining their assumptions, dogmas, and prejudices.
    26. 26. 1.6 Barriers to Critical ThinkingIf Critical Thinking is so important, why is it that uncritical thinking is so common? Why is that so many people including many highly educated and intelligent people find critical thinking so difficult?
    27. 27. 1.6 Barriers to Critical Thinking Common Barriers Lack of relevant background Distrust of reason information Stereotyping Poor reading skills Unwarranted assumptions and Poor listening skills stereotypes Bias Relativistic thinking Prejudice Scapegoating Superstition Rationalization Egocentrism Wishful thinking Socio-centrism Short-term thinking Peer pressure Selective perception / attention Mindless Conformism Selective memory Mindless non-conformism Overpowering emotions Provincialism Self-deception Narrow-mindedness Face-saving Closed-mindedness Fear of change
    28. 28. 1.6 Barriers to Critical ThinkingFive Powerful Barriers to Critical Thinking: Self-centered thinking I am probably the greatest • self-interested thinking Egocentrism • self-serving bias thinker since Socrates! Group-centered thinking Sociocentrism • Group bias • Conformism Beliefs that are presumed to be true without Unwarranted adequate evidence or justification • Assumption Assumptions •Stereotyping Believing that something is true because Wishful one wishes it were true. Thinking The truth is “just a matter of opinion” • Relativism Relativistic  Subjectivism Thinking  Cultural relativism
    29. 29. 1.6 Mini Quiz – Question 1 In a 1989 international study of 13-year-olds, Koreans finished first in mathematics and Americans finished last. Yet when asked whether they thought they were "good at mathematics," only 23 percent of Koreans said "yes," compared to 68 percent of Americans.Which critical thinking barrier do the American students exhibit:C) Self-interested thinkingD) Group biasE) Self-serving biasF) Conformism
    30. 30. 1.6 Mini Quiz – Question 2 Muhammad Ali [speaking in Zaire, Africa]: "Theres no country as great as the smallest city in America. I mean [here in Zaire] you cant watch television. The water wont even run right. The toilets wont flush. The roads, the cars- theres nothing as great as America."Which critical thinking barrier does Ali display in this passage?A) Self-interested thinkingB) Group biasC) Self-serving biasD) Conformism
    31. 31. 1.6 Mini Quiz – Question 3 Adam: My friend Andy is a 1st year student at UNITAR. He is cool, loves hanging out, and has a very laid-back personality. Lee: I bet he’s from KL.Which critical thinking barrier does Lee exhibit?A) Self-interested thinkingB) StereotypingC) Group biasD) Conformism
    32. 32. 1.6 Mini Quiz – Question 4Suzie: I cant believe I got a B- on this marketing paper. My friend Sarah turned in this same paper in a different marketing class last semester, and she got an A.Ali : Dont you realize its wrong to plagiarize someone elses work?Suzie: Thats your opinion. Whats wrong for one person isnt necessarily wrong for another, and I say theres nothing wrong with plagiarism- as long as you dont get caught.Which critical thinking barrier does Suzie exhibit?A) StereotypingB) Self-interested thinkingC) Wishful thinkingD) Relativistic thinking
    33. 33. 1.7 Characteristics of a Critical Thinker Are you OPEN MINDED about other people’s view? Are you HONEST to yourself (or others) when you are wrong? Do you have the COURAGE and PASSION to take initiative and confront problems and meet challenges? Are you AWARE of your own biases and preconceptions? The Force, I sense is Do you WELCOME CRITICISM from other people? with you. Do you have INDEPENDENT opinions and are not afraid to disagree?
    34. 34. Critical Thinkers Uncritical Thinkers 1.7 Characteristics of a Critical ThinkerHave a passionate drive for clarity, precision, accuracy, Often think in ways that are unclear, imprecise,relevance, consistency, logicalness, completeness, and inaccurate, etc.fairness.Are sensitive to ways in which critical thinking can be Often fall prey to egocentrism, sociocentrism,skewed by egocentrism, sociocentrism, wishful thinking, wishful thinking, etc.etc.Are intellectually honest with themselves, acknowledging Pretend they know more than they do and ignorewhat they don’t know and recognizing their limitations. their limitations.Listen open-mindedly to opposing points of view and Are close-minded and resist criticisms of beliefs andwelcome criticisms of beliefs and assumptions. assumptions.Base their beliefs on facts and evidence rather than on Often base their beliefs on mere personalpersonal preference or self-interest. preference or self interest.Are aware of the biases and preconceptions that shape Lack awareness of their own biases andthe way they perceive the world. preconceptions.Think independently and are not afraid to disagree with Tend to engage in ‘group think’, uncritically followinggroup opinion. the beliefs and values of the crowd.Are able to get to the heart of an issue or problem, without Are easily distracted and lack the ability to zero inbeing distracted by details. on the essence of a problem or issue.Have the intellectual courage to face and assess fairly Fear and resist ideas that challenge their basicideas that challenge even their most basic beliefs. beliefs.Love truth and curious about a wide range of issues. Are often relatively indifferent to truth and lack of curiosity.Have the intellectual perseverance to pursue insights or Tend to preserve when they encounter intellectualtruths, despite obstacles or difficulties. obstacles or difficulties.
    35. 35. Group ActivityBreak into groups of 4-5, and then discuss, identify and rank the Top 10 characteristics/traits/behaviours of an EXCELLENT: Dr. Yoda was an excellent teacher, because he LECTURER engaged our mind, had activities, etc. STUDENTChoose one member of your group to take notes and be the group reporter.10 min Brainstorm together and identify 10 characteristics for each item above. (e.g. try to remember the best lecturer(s) you have ever had and then identify their characteristics…). .5 min Prioritize and rank the chosen characteristics of each item above according to importance (e.g. Top 10).15 min Group presentation & discussion - The Group reporter must submit their findings in hard copy format after the class (use template) or soft-copy format to the lecturer before next class.
    36. 36. Summary1. What is Thinking? Thinking is a purposeful, organized cognitive process that we use to make sense of our world.2. Types of Thinking Creative & Critical Thinking3. What is Critical Thinking? Critical Thinking is the general term given to a wide range of cognitive and intellectual skills needed to: Effectively identify, analyze, and evaluate arguments; Discover and overcome personal prejudices and biases; Formulate and present convincing reasons in support of conclusions; and Make reasonable, intelligent decisions about what to believe and what to do. Critical thinking skills emphasized in this course, include: Reasoning, Analyzing, Evaluating, Decision Making and Problem solving.4. Critical Thinking Standards Clarity, Accuracy, Precision, Relevance, Depth, Breadth, Logic and Fairness5. Benefits of Critical Thinking Academic performance, workplace and daily life.6. Barriers to Critical Thinking Examples include Egocentrism, Sociocentrism, Unwarranted Assumptions, Wishful Thinking, and Relativistic Thinking7. Characteristics of a Critical Open-mindedness, independent thinking, self-aware,Thinker passionate, insightful, honest and intellectual humility, intellectual courage, and welcome criticism, etc.
    37. 37. Any Questions?
    38. 38. The End

    ×