Understanding Conflict Styles - using the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Model

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A recent presentation on Conflict Management given by Eleanor Yearwood of Key Talent Partners. The presentation reflects on the use of the Thoman Kilmann Conflict Model to help people be more aware of their - and others' - style of conflict handling, and how better awareness might help us adapt our style in order to have more influence. Adapting our style may also make us more effective negotiators, enhance interpersonal group dynamics and is applicable at every level of an organisation. The model also promotes the idea that different strategies work better in different situations, and by being more aware of our 'default' approach, we can learn to choose the most appropriate approach to give us the results we want in a particular context.

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  • The TKI is great for certain purposes. If you have a big training budget and 100% cultural similarity in your training group it's fine. Unfortunately those two requirements don't apply in many situations. For an instrument that addresses those two challenges, take at look at the 'Style Matters' conflict style inventory. TKI trainers find it very familiar because, like the TKI, it is based on the Mouton Blake Grid. But it has a simple feature of cultural adaptability built into it, a lot more user info, and sells for less than half the price. See it at www.RiverhouseEpress.com or send a note to center@riverhouseepress.com and we'll send you a free review copy, and a free Trainers Guide.
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Understanding Conflict Styles - using the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Model

  1. 1. Coping with Conflict using the Thomas Kilmann Conflict Model Welcome to (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013
  2. 2. Quick Summary Glasgow Edinburgh EdinburghDundee St Andrews London
  3. 3. Conflict is . . . any situation in which your concerns or desires differ from those of another person (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013
  4. 4. Cost of Conflict to UK businesses • OPP and CIPD study (UK 2010) shows that UK businesses estimate the cost to be £24 billion every year • 64% consider that conflict negatively impacted upon workforce performance • 40% of all grievances at work are said to be relationship related • HR employees spend on average about 23 days per year dealing with conflict • Unmanaged conflict is the largest reducible cost in organisations (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013
  5. 5. The TKi can be used to: Improve communication Improve decision-making Improve negotiating skills Assist with team development (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013
  6. 6. Dealing with conflict inappropriately can cause: • Lack of productivity and engagement • Low moral and people leaving • Grievances and industrial tribunals cases • Poor team and company reputation (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013
  7. 7. Conflict Management (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013 Thomas-Kilmann CONFLICT MODEL
  8. 8. The Five Conflict-Handling Modes (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013
  9. 9. Competing (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013 “My way or the highway”
  10. 10. Accommodating (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013 “It would be my pleasure”
  11. 11. Avoiding (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013 “I’ll think about it tomorrow”
  12. 12. Collaborating (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013 “Two heads are better than one”
  13. 13. Compromising (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013 “Let’s make a deal”
  14. 14. Team Member Behaviours in meetings Competitor: Monopolising, not listening, exaggerating, attacking, blocking Collaborator: Over analysing, risk sharing, continuing to problem solve when it’s not working, dithering, prying Compromiser: Posturing, rushing to settle, eroding a principle, sub-optimising, settling Avoider: Missing meetings, avoiding team mates, with holding information, procrastinating, foot-dragging Accommodator: Shading the truth sacrificing, allowing questionable decisions to go ahead, bending the rules, appeasing others (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013
  15. 15. Team Member Behaviours in meetings Competitor: Great at standing up for what they believe in, fighting their corner for their teams needs Collaborator: Great at seeing both sides of the discussion and allowing others to have an opinion and not closing them down Compromiser: Great at making fast decisions where it meets the needs of both parties (at least partially) Avoider: Great at side-stepping or allowing others the opportunity to run with this topic... Accommodator: Great at allowing others to have their own way and tolerating decisions that they don’t like (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013
  16. 16. When and Where can you use Tki ? • Tki is ideal for helping an individual explore their own influencing style • Demonstrate how they can adapt their style to be a more effective negotiator • It can also enhance interpersonal group dynamics • Is applicable at every level of an organisation • It promotes the idea that different strategies work better in different situations • By being more aware of our 'default' approach, we can learn to choose the most appropriate approach to give us the results we want in a particular context (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013
  17. 17. Offer to Women Ahead Members I’m offering 2 Companies a chance to have a free lunch and learn session similar to today. Please drop your business card in the box if you’d like to take part and we will draw them before you all leave. I’m also looking for references and testimonials so if you’d like to have 3 x 2 hour one to one coaching sessions with me in return for a testimonial or case study, please let me know. I’m looking for two individuals who already manage people but would like to improve how they manage, motivate and influence their team. And lastly if you're into Facebook please ‘like’ my page ( www.facebook.com/KeyTalentPartners) and connect with me on Linked-in. (C) Copyright Key Talent Partners 2013

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