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Behavioral Economics in Games. Casual Connect London 2018

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Behavioral Economics in Games. Casual Connect London 2018

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Lead Analyst Vasiliy Sabirov from devtodev.com participated at Casual Connect in London in 2018.
He explained why players do not always make rational decisions and how game developers can use it.

What the presentation is about?
- Classical economics and Behavioral economics
- Survivorship bias
- Selective perception
- Endowment effect
- Tricks and experiments. Opportunity to choose
- Paradox of choice
- The .99 prices
- Anchoring
- The power of free
- Visualization
- Games are an emotional product
- Here’s how we work at devtodev.com

Author Bio
Vasiliy Sabirov, Lead Analyst & Co-Founder at devtodev.com. 7+ years of game analytics experience.
Check devtodev Education Center for more articles and exclusive webinars on mobile analytics - https://www.devtodev.com/education-center.

Lead Analyst Vasiliy Sabirov from devtodev.com participated at Casual Connect in London in 2018.
He explained why players do not always make rational decisions and how game developers can use it.

What the presentation is about?
- Classical economics and Behavioral economics
- Survivorship bias
- Selective perception
- Endowment effect
- Tricks and experiments. Opportunity to choose
- Paradox of choice
- The .99 prices
- Anchoring
- The power of free
- Visualization
- Games are an emotional product
- Here’s how we work at devtodev.com

Author Bio
Vasiliy Sabirov, Lead Analyst & Co-Founder at devtodev.com. 7+ years of game analytics experience.
Check devtodev Education Center for more articles and exclusive webinars on mobile analytics - https://www.devtodev.com/education-center.

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Behavioral Economics in Games. Casual Connect London 2018

  1. 1. Behavioral Economics in Games Why Players Do Not Always Make Rational Decisions and How to Use it When Developing Games 29–31 May 2018 | London Vasiliy Sabirov lead analyst devtodev
  2. 2. Behavioral economics Classical economics implies that all subjects act rationally. Behavioral economics says the opposite.
  3. 3. Survivorship bias Source
  4. 4. Survivorship bias
  5. 5. Survivorship bias Surveys and customer development should be done not only for your current users, but also for those who churned. Not only for those who pay, but also for non-paying users. Don’t focus only on success.
  6. 6. Selective perception
  7. 7. Selective perception Community management: ● there will always be dissatisfied players; ● focus on negative aspects; ● learn to settle situations.
  8. 8. Behavioral economics Source
  9. 9. Endowment effect ● people value things that they already own more than those they can get ● don’t take away virtual currency, players will find where to spend it themselves ● instead of taking away, give less (but give!) resources
  10. 10. Endowment effect ● create a trial version ● give players an opportunity to invest something in your game ● opportunity to dress up a character
  11. 11. Endowment effect Source
  12. 12. Tricks and experiments Opportunity to choose Source
  13. 13. Tricks and experiments Paradox of choice Source
  14. 14. Tricks and experiments Paradox of choice Source
  15. 15. Tricks and experiments 4 types of prices: ○ Rounded ($37) ○ Rounded with zeros ($34,00) ○ Exact ($24,35) ○ «Charm» (39,99$ or 34,95$) Source
  16. 16. Tricks and experiments ○ round numbers are easier and quicker to comprehend than exact numbers; ○ our brain reads numbers from left to right; ○ don’t use exact prices if a good is related to emotional purchases; ○ if the price is less than 10$, use «charm» prices regardless of a good category Source
  17. 17. Tricks and experiments The .99 prices Source
  18. 18. Tricks and experiments Bait: ○ web subscription (59$) ○ print subscription (125$) ○ print + web subscription (125$) Source
  19. 19. Tricks and experiments Bait: ■ web subscription (59$) - 16% ■ print subscription (125$) - 0% ■ print + web subscription (125$) - 84% ARPU = $114.44 Source
  20. 20. Tricks and experiments Bait: ○ web subscription (59$) ○ print subscription (125$) ○ print + web subscription (125$) Source
  21. 21. Tricks and experiments Bait: ○ web subscription (59$) - 68% ○ print subscription (125$) ○ print + web subscription (125$) - 32% ARPU = $80.12 Source
  22. 22. Tricks and experiments Source
  23. 23. Tricks and experiments Anchoring Source
  24. 24. Tricks and experiments Anchoring The share of African countries in the UN? More than 65%? How much? Sources
  25. 25. Tricks and experiments Anchoring The share of African countries in the UN? More than 10%? How much? Source
  26. 26. Tricks and experiments Anchoring ● Anchor 65% -> 45% ● Anchor 10% -> 25% Source
  27. 27. Tricks and experiments Anchoring Source
  28. 28. Tricks and experiments Anchoring - conclusions ● don’t make prices too low; ● give an expensive alternative; ● show it first. Source
  29. 29. Трюки и эксперименты Power of free Free vs Paid: ● Кейс Amazon: ○ заказать одну книгу за $20 + $5 за доставку? ○ заказать одну книгу за $20 + одну за $15 + доставка за $0? Примеры доминанты “бесплатного”: ● F2P-игры ● ночь музеев ● кейс с подарком в виртуальной валюте Источник
  30. 30. Tricks and experiments The power of free People like when something’s free: ● Night of museums ● F2P games ● Free samples Gifts in currency: ● 30% in short-term revenue ● 10% in long-term revenue Source
  31. 31. Tricks and experiments Visualization of what needs to be bought Source
  32. 32. Tricks and experiments Visualization - how to use it? ● the order of packages in the shop; ● “the most popular offer” and other additional information Source
  33. 33. Tricks and experiments A few more recommendations ○ The rule of the hundred ■ P < $100 -> discount in % ■ P > $100 -> discount in $ ○ Choose numbers with fewer syllables; ○ Visualize difference between two prices; ○ The currency symbol is important: if you don’t specify currency, conversion can be higher. Source
  34. 34. Conclusions People make emotional decisions, especially in games. Games are an emotional product. Our aim is to turn this players’ feature into a win-win strategy.
  35. 35. In today’s highly competitive F2P market creating a good game is only a part of success. There are so many problems that developers have to solve during the app lifecycle. www.devtodev.com There are so many problems that game developers have to solve
  36. 36. www.devtodev.com Here’s how we work
  37. 37. THANK YOU! Vasiliy Sabirov lead analyst www.devtodev.com sabirov@devtodev.com www.devtodev.com

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