Shape changers presentation-aug2010

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This presentation was used to share my thoughts on the conceptual merits of utilizing business metaphors in international human rights compliance and enforcement activity. I presented it to a selection of faculty at the Aarhus School of Business, Aarhus, Denmark, in a presentation at their school in May, 2010.

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Shape changers presentation-aug2010

  1. 1. Shape-Changers:<br />Embracing Cross-Cultural Business Metaphors <br />in International Human Rights Law <br />by<br />June Edvenson<br />Edvenson Consulting Edvenson Legal<br />© 2010<br />
  2. 2. Conceptual Framework<br /><ul><li>General problems with U.N. human rights compliance
  3. 3. Metaphor analysis in human rights legal scholarship
  4. 4. The U.N.’s standard enforcement model
  5. 5. Knowledge-related approaches
  6. 6. Successful business metaphor analysis
  7. 7. Business metaphors for the future
  8. 8. A call to action</li></li></ul><li>General Problem<br /><ul><li>States fail to lead in international human rights (IHR) norm grounding.
  9. 9. International human rights are not matched by the means needed for their implementation.
  10. 10. IHR struggle to adapt and respond to human rights abuses.
  11. 11. Organizations responsible for abuses are</li></ul> not ’States,’ or are ’non-State’ actors.<br />
  12. 12. Metaphors in International Human Rights Law Scholarship<br /><ul><li>Victim
  13. 13. Savage
  14. 14. Saviour
  15. 15. Makau Mutua</li></li></ul><li>Metaphors in International Law Grounding<br /><ul><li>Harmonization
  16. 16. Transplantation
  17. 17. Viral propagation
  18. 18. Roderick Macdonald</li></li></ul><li>Knowledge Asymmetries <br />Int’l Human Rights process<br /><ul><li>Bureaucratic hierarchy
  19. 19. Language of law
  20. 20. Universal values
  21. 21. Investment for few</li></ul>Business-related aspects<br /><ul><li>Lack of ownership
  22. 22. Language of business
  23. 23. Locally embraced values
  24. 24. Investment for all</li></li></ul><li>Key metaphorical elements<br />Ownership<br />Trade <br />Business value<br />
  25. 25. Current Responses<br />Chaos, Control, Corruption<br />See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil.<br />
  26. 26. Standard rights & enforcement issues<br />’Rights to’ provisions<br />’Freedom from’ provision<br /> -Universal Declaration of Human Rights (’48)<br /> -Int’l Covenant on Civil & Political Rights (’66)<br /><ul><li>State parties
  27. 27. Derogations
  28. 28. Limitations
  29. 29. Investigations
  30. 30. ”Recommendations”
  31. 31. Conflicting treatments</li></li></ul><li>Using a knowledge focus<br />Knowledge Is:<br />Embodied, a part of us<br />Non-conscious, automatic<br />Continuous and organic<br />Enacting - discriminating<br />Based on feelings & the ’felt sense’<br />Human-bound and meaning-making<br />Daniel Andriessen & Marien Van Den Boom (2009)<br />
  32. 32. Successful Business Metaphors<br /><ul><li>Journey
  33. 33. Organism
  34. 34. War
  35. 35. Game
  36. 36. Society
  37. 37. Machine
  38. 38. John J. Clancy</li></li></ul><li>Successful Business Metaphors<br />Journey - Born free (Art. 1), a person under the law (Art. 6)<br />Organism – Right to life (Art. 3)<br />War – Freedom from torture (Art. 6)<br />Game – Right to be presumed innocent (Art. 11)<br />Society – Right to seek asylum (Art. 14)<br />Machine – Right to remedy for violations of rights (Art. 8)<br />References: U.N.’s UDHR<br />
  39. 39. Critique & Responses<br /><ul><li>Naive
  40. 40. Not a game-changer
  41. 41. Ignores conflicting interests
  42. 42. Does not accommodate cultural differences
  43. 43. Does not recognize role of cultural relativism
  44. 44. Is a semantic exercise
  45. 45. Is naming, and therefore a power strategy</li></li></ul><li>Why Metaphors?<br />Metaphors play a structuring role.<br />Metaphors play a process role.<br />Metaphors play an organizational role.<br />Metaphors play a role in <br />efficient understanding.<br /> -Matthew McGlone<br />
  46. 46. Business Metaphors of the Future<br />’cathedral building’?<br />The ’eclectic’?<br />The shape-changer<br />The market-place<br />Voyaging<br />Warring<br />Surviving<br />John J. Clancy<br />
  47. 47. The Shape-changer<br />Bird<br />Bear<br />Horse<br />Chameleon<br />Sight<br />Strength<br />Assistance<br />Flexibility, seeming size<br />
  48. 48. The market fair<br /> . . . of international <br />human rights<br />compliance & enforcement?<br />Novelty<br />Change<br />Invisible powers<br />Flexibility<br />Ownership<br />Investment<br />
  49. 49. Changing behavior?<br />”human capabilities” approach<br />”truly human functioning”<br />Amartya Sen<br />Martha G. Nussbaum<br />
  50. 50. Examples<br />The ’disappeared’<br />An example of the viral metaphor<br />Ownership<br />National identity<br />Family<br />Africa<br />Lack of ownership – membership - constituency<br />Lack of participation – Risk of retribution<br />No incentive to foster IHR language- norms<br />
  51. 51. New Directions<br />International Human Rights Norm Compliance & Enforcement<br /><ul><li>Organizational behavior
  52. 52. Ownership values
  53. 53. Trade-supportive
  54. 54. Self-reinforcing
  55. 55. Permeable
  56. 56. Organic growth
  57. 57. Broader partnerships
  58. 58. Self-perpetuating – viral
  59. 59. 360 degree feedback
  60. 60. Learning method based
  61. 61. Cross-cultural
  62. 62. Interdependent
  63. 63. Flourishing, Flow
  64. 64. Creative
  65. 65. Stress-sensitive</li></ul>and . . . A SHAPE-CHANGER<br />
  66. 66. The New IHR Journey:Utilizing the strength of successful business metaphorsSmartShape-changingSelf-perpetuatingSelf-reinforcingKnowledge sensitive<br />June Edvenson<br />Edvenson Consulting Edvenson Legal<br />© 2010<br />

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