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Eric "Doc" Wright: Agilizing Predictively Planned and Delivered Projects: Evolving Your Project Management Mindset

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Eric "Doc" Wright: Agilizing Predictively Planned and Delivered Projects: Evolving Your Project Management Mindset

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Global Online PMDay

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Eric "Doc" Wright: Agilizing Predictively Planned and Delivered Projects: Evolving Your Project Management Mindset

  1. 1. Adopting An Agile Mindset Across The Organization It’s Not Just For Project Management Anymore Eric “Doc” Wright, PhD, CM, PMP, ACP, CSM, PSM
  2. 2. What Is “Agile” Any Way?
  3. 3. Agile Rests On 4 Values And 12 Principles
  4. 4. The Project Management Conversation’s Evolution Old School… Or New School…
  5. 5. Six Tenets Of An Organization-wide Agile Mindset
  6. 6. Six Tenets Of An Organization-wide Agile Mindset 1. Include your customers (agile), stakeholders (predictive), and project teams
  7. 7. Six Tenets Of An Organization-wide Agile Mindset 1. Include your customers (agile), stakeholders (predictive), and project teams 2. Practice, i.e., use, Continuous Process Improvement
  8. 8. Six Tenets Of An Organization-wide Agile Mindset 1. Include your customers (agile), stakeholders (predictive), and project teams 2. Practice, i.e., use, Continuous Process Improvement 3. Create High-Performing Teams
  9. 9. Six Tenets Of An Organization-wide Agile Mindset 1. Include your customers (agile), stakeholders (predictive), and project teams 2. Practice, i.e., use, Continuous Process Improvement 3. Create High-Performing Teams 4. Fail fast!
  10. 10. Six Tenets Of An Organization-wide Agile Mindset 1. Include your customers (agile), stakeholders (predictive), and project teams 2. Practice, i.e., use, Continuous Process Improvement 3. Create High-Performing Teams 4. Fail fast! 5. Demonstrate value (“V”) often
  11. 11. Six Tenets Of An Organization-wide Agile Mindset 1. Include your customers (agile), stakeholders (predictive), and project teams 2. Practice, i.e., use, Continuous Process Improvement 3. Create High-Performing Teams 4. Fail fast! 5. Demonstrate value (“V”) often 6. “A, B, C”
  12. 12. Today’s Keynote Is…

Editor's Notes

  • Remember the old Florida orange juice commercials suggesting that orange juice wasn’t just for breakfast anymore? That’s because its benefits of being healthy, delicious, and flexible in complimenting many other food stuffs could be enjoyed throughout the day.

    An agile project management mindset is similar; organizations that adopt an agile mindset across their organizations, not just in their project management shops, can realize many benefits, such as increased profitability, productivity, continuous internal and external value, customer retention, and longevity. Today, I’ll show you how.
  • But to set the stage first, what in the heck is “agile” and why a “mindset”?

    Well, agile has been called a “framework”. In fact, one of its original creators, Ken Schwaber, called it a “lightweight framework”, but only as applied in software development projects because historically that is the only type of project it was used in. So, if you’re not conducting a project to develop a piece of software, you must adapt this “framework” right?

    OK, so if we’re tailoring it then, it’s a project planning and delivery methodology right, a way to do things that don’t have an SOP. However, critics would say “No!”, because there isn’t just one way to approach how to plan and deliver a project. In fact, for example, Scrum, Scrumban, Ten Step, and Lean are just a handful of examples of the over three dozen agile flavors of the day and counting! If one way is agile, how come so many different flavors? Well, because like a lot of other things in project management, it depends on first, what does the organization need and can it support, second, what do the customers want? Third, what can the sponsor or PO support? Fourth, what does the PM know, is able to do, and can speak, and fifth, what does the team know and what can they do. These five considerations dictate how we will deliver the project’s value. If they’re not aligned, we can’t plan and deliver the project in accordance with them!

    And speaking of flavors, you’ve heard me mention it several times already, each flavor has it’s own words, i.e. dialect of Pm! For example, if we’re delivering the project’s deliverables in succession, i.e., predictively, we’re serving a sponsor, the person paying for the project, and the project’s stakeholders, those with an interest in it or expectation of some benefit from it. On the other hand, if we’re delivering a web site in increments, we successively add more and more value to customers through additional features, the overall scope of which is owned and managed by a Product Owner. In fact, this is the simple definition of an agile project, incremental value delivered cumulatively in accordance with customer desires in terms of value and changes. If the increment is called a scrum, we have a scrum master instead of a project coach. See? I’ll illustrate this with more examples as we proceed through this talk today…

    Finally, in light of my three decades experience delivering tens of millions of $$$$ in projects of all sizes in all three sectors of our economy, and the five factors we just discussed, I say being agile is a mindset…the way in which one thinks about delivering value to whom, when, and verifying along the way that we did. It that’s the case, it works at the strategic organizational level too, in addition to the traditional tactical level in which agile project management has here to fore lived…
  • 4 Values:
    Individuals and interactions over processes and tools.
    Working software over comprehensive documentation.
    Customer collaboration over contract negotiation.
    Responding to change over following a plan.
    12 Principles
    Satisfying customers through early and continuous delivery of valuable work.
    Breaking big work down into smaller tasks that can be completed quickly.
    Recognizing that the best work emerges from self-organized teams.
    Providing motivated individuals with the environment and support they need and trusting them to get the job done.
    Creating processes that promote sustainable efforts.
    Maintaining a constant pace for completed work.
    Welcoming changing requirements, even late in a project.
    Assembling the project team and business owners on a daily basis throughout the project.
    Having the team reflect at regular intervals on how to become more effective, then tuning and adjusting behavior accordingly.
    Measuring progress by the amount of completed work.
    Continually seeking excellence.
    Harnessing change for a competitive advantage.
  • Explain “dialects” by illustrating the hiring conversation based on evolution of Pm role and emerging KSAs…i.e., customer focus, speed to market, and continuous value delivery…
    OS: Are you a Pm? Yes, I have a PMP.
    NS: Are you a Pm? Why yes, I have experience across a range of project delivery experiences, as a PMP, CSM or PSM, or ACP, SAFety expert, or what have you…what are you looking for?
    The takeaway is that today, we need professional Pms that can identify nails from screws, and use the appropriate tool to get the job done; screwdrivers don’t drive nails too well!
    But that means pivoting between a “leading and directing” predictive-type approach, to a more agile coaching, teaching, advising, suggesting, and assisting, i.e., an agiling approach.
  • So, your mindset is a set of beliefs that shape how you make sense of the world and yourself. It influences how you think, feel, and behave in any given situation. It shapes your inner dialogue…

    These items are of prime interest when we’re discussing A) the behavior of the PM, or coach, B) their optimism and conviction in themselves regarding their ability to influence, and C) their self-talk.
  • Explain difference between Stakeholders and Team Members

    Explain User Stories: Person + Need + Purpose
    Plus, they’re additional “Stakeholder Analysis Tools”
    Increased customer focus
    Drives daily work that delivers value

    Include them in planning, metric creation, activity identification, decision-making
  • How to ensure use? Build it in!
    In agile project increments (agile) or sprints, (scrum), we collect and incorporate feedback after each one! It’s baked in as formal required meetings.
    Figure out how to do that during your routines…
  • Create HPTs through
    Autonomy via accountability and responsibility
    Set clear expectations; they do, as Ground Rules, with enforcement! “Self organization isn’t enough; we need team enforcement too!” (TWEET)

    Empowerment through self-organization, self-direction, and decision-making capability
    Tuckman’s Team Development Ladder

    Servant Leadership, to team, to Sponsor or Product Owner, to Organization, to Vendors and Customers
    “Teach, coach, advise, and suggest…”
  • Fail fast so you know what you know, harness the power of empiricism! Build in experiments and spikes (explain usage)…use a course dev e.g.
  • Bring it! Early, often, and consistently!
    User Stories
    Empirical results
    Release plans
    Definition of Done
  • As our friend here is demonstrating, the final tenet is not Alec Baldwin’s famous “Always Be Closing” scene from Glengarry, Glenn Ross, but instead we’re talking about our friend here, being vocal. What does that mean in agile context though, be vocal?

    First, it means be courageously candid in your conversations and dealings, it’s the bedrock of trust in mature relationships.

    Second it means learn to say “No!” too! But, learn to add “but we could…” after it. It promotes reality, compassion, empathy, and leads to problem solving through discussion and decision-making, which involves your stakeholders, customers, or teams, deepens their commitment, and makes them implicit in outcomes!
  • An agile mindset can bring massive value across the organization when adopted outside the project management shop.

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