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Beliefs about learning: an interactive quiz

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Beliefs about learning: an interactive learning quiz. Workshop delivered at Shasta College, CA August 2017

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Beliefs about learning: an interactive quiz

  1. 1. An interactive learning quiz SHASTA COLLEGE, AUGUST 2017
  2. 2. Overview •  Things you know about learning •  Things you (maybe) didn’t know about learning •  Things you know about learning that ain’t so
  3. 3. 1 2 3
  4. 4. Warm up: your expertise? How much would you say you know about how learning works?
  5. 5. Q1: What’s the most important factor in successful learning ?
  6. 6. Q1: What’s the most important factor in successful learning ? From Chew: h+ps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9O7y7XEC66M&index=3&list=PL85708E6EA236E3DB
  7. 7. Q1: What’s the most important factor in successful learning ? From Chew: h+ps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9O7y7XEC66M&index=3&list=PL85708E6EA236E3DB
  8. 8. Q2: Learning is most effective when the instructional style matches the student’s preferred learning style
  9. 9. Q2: Learning is most effective when the instructional style matches the student’s preferred learning style Pashler, H., McDaniel, M., Rohrer, D., & Bjork, R. (2008). Learning styles: Concepts and evidence. Psychological science in the public interest, 9(3), 105-119. “The learning-styles view has acquired great influence within the educa7on field, and is frequently encountered at levels ranging from kindergarten to graduate school. There is a thriving industry devoted to publishing learning-styles tests and guidebooks for teachers, and many organiza7ons offer professional development workshops for teachers and educators built around the concept of learning styles.”
  10. 10. Pashler, H., McDaniel, M., Rohrer, D., & Bjork, R. (2008). Learning styles: Concepts and evidence. Psychological science in the public interest, 9(3), 105-119.
  11. 11. Q3: Effective and less effective study habits Pashler, H., McDaniel, M., Rohrer, D., & Bjork, R. (2008). Learning styles: Concepts and evidence. Psychological science in the public interest, 9(3), 105-119.
  12. 12. Rules of studying 1.  Passive re-reading 2.  Highlighting overkill 3.  “Yeah, I could do that” 4.  Cramming 5.  Solving problems you know how to solve 6.  Group study sessions becoming too social 7.  Not resolving difficulties 8.  ‘Learning’ when distracted 9.  Not getting enough sleep
  13. 13. Rules of studying 1.  Testing recall, application 2.  Spacing your practice 3.  Mixing up what you do 4.  Taking breaks, studying intensively 5.  Discuss it with others 6.  “Explain it to a 10 year old” 7.  Focus 8.  Know your golden time
  14. 14. Q4: What is best for retention?
  15. 15. Q4: What is best for retention? Roediger & Karpicke (2006) : •  4x 5 minute study of material (prose passage) •  3 groups: SSSS, SSST, STTT •  Retention test 1 week later •  Recall passage (scored as recall of ‘idea units’)
  16. 16. Roediger III, H. L., & Karpicke, J. D. (2006). Test-enhanced learning: Taking memory tests improves long-term reten^on. Psychological science, 17(3), 249-255.
  17. 17. Q5: Metacognition and ability
  18. 18. Q5: Metacognition and ability
  19. 19. Q5: Metacognition and ability
  20. 20. Q5: Metacognition and ability Week 1 of course
  21. 21. Q5: Metacognition and ability Week 10 of course
  22. 22. Take homes 1.  Deep processing supports learning – we need to help students make connections, integrate knowledge, build mental structures of knowledge 2. Learning styles (specifically the efficacy of the meshing hypothesis) is NOT a thing. 3. Many students arrive with good and bad study habits – we need to make visible the reasons why effective learning requires effortful / deliberate practice 4. Testing can enhance learning – with frequent, low-stakes, spaced testing augmented by feedback being the most potent combination. 5. Weaker students may have under-developed skills to judge their own performance, which can have a significant impact on how they approach learning
  23. 23. Resources / bibliography One page description from CMU website http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/principles/ index.html Brent, R. & Felder, R. (2011). Random thoughts… how learning works. Chemical Engineering Education 45(4). 257-8. Available at: http://www4.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/ users/f/felder/public/Columns/ Ambrose.pdf Five page summary of the 7 principles http://bit.ly/HLWshort
  24. 24. Resources / bibliographyIn the order in which they appear in the slides: Question 1: most important factor for learning Stephen L Chew Improving Classroom Performance by Challenging Student Misconceptions about Learning https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/improving-classroom-performance-by-challenging-student- misconceptions-about-learning Stephen L Chew: How to get the most out of studying video series https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL85708E6EA236E3DB Hyde, T.A., & Jenkins, J.J. (1973). Recall for words as a func^on of seman^c, graphic, and syntac^c orien^ng tasks. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 12, 471-480. Question 2: Learning styles Popular science article http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-08/everything-youve-ever-been-told-about-how-brain-learns-lie? page=2#page-2 Pashler, H., McDaniel, M., Rohrer, D., & Bjork, R. (2008). Learning styles: Concepts and evidence. Psychological science in the public interest, 9(3), 105-119. https://www.psychologicalscience.org/journals/pspi/PSPI_9_3.pdf Rohrer, D., Paschler, H., (2012). Learning styles: where’s the evidence? Medical Education 46, 630-635.
  25. 25. Resources / bibliographyIn the order in which they appear in the slides: Question 3: rules for studying Rick Reis, Tomorrow’s Professor archives, post 1346 https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1346 Richard Felder’s “Memo to students who are disappointed with their last test grade” h+p://www4.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/public/Columns/memo.pdf Barbara Oakley’s “A Mind for Numbers: how to success at math and science (even if you flunked algebra)” h+p://cgi.stanford.edu/~dept-ctl/tomprof/pos^ng.php?ID=1346 Ques^on 4: test enhanced learning Roediger III, H. L., & Karpicke, J. D. (2006). Test-enhanced learning: Taking memory tests improves long-term reten^on. Psychological science, 17(3), 249-255. h+p://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01693.x New York Times: To really learn, quit studying and take a test h+p://www.ny^mes.com/2011/01/21/science/21memory.html
  26. 26. Resources / bibliographyIn the order in which they appear in the slides: Question 5: metacognition and ability Kruger, J., & Dunning, D. (1999). Unskilled and unaware of it: how difficul^es in recognizing one's own incompetence lead to inflated self-assessments. Journal of personality and social psychology, 77(6), 1121. Galloway, R. K., Bates, S. P., Parker, J., & Usoskina, E. (2013, January). The effect of research-based instruc^on in introductory physics on a common cogni^ve bias. In AIP Conference Proceedings (Vol. 1513, No. 1, pp. 138-141). AIP. General resources: h+ps://www.inc.com/abigail-tracy/three-learning-myths-debunked.html h+ps://www.fastcompany.com/40420472/five-popular-myths-about-learning-that-are-completely-wrong h+ps://www.logicearth.com/blog/five-common-but-inexcusable-learning-myths-about-how-we-learn h+p://wiki.ubc.ca/Learning_Commons:Content/Myths_About_Learning

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