Ben RittSession #4 Underwater Survey                  7/5/2012
   3/4of Earth’s surface is water   Water-borne transportation has allowed    exploration of much of the globe and    fa...
   The majority of    underwater    archaeologists    specialize in the study    of nautical    archaeology: the study   ...
   Other types of sites in    include inundated land    sites; sinkholes or bogs    where people placed    offerings or b...
   Many laws and    regulations require    that sites be located,    inventoried, and    studied by qualified    archaeol...
   Often Submerged sites such as ship wrecks    pose a danger to modern human endeavors;    shipping lanes, seabed mining...
Trans oceanic cable map   Cable layer, $1.6 million
   Studying where and    how ships have    wrecked in the past    has lead to    developments in safer    marine navigati...
   120 lead ingots recovered 20 years ago from a    Roman shipwreck, 80 B.C. - 50 B.C. off the coast    of Sardinia    S...
Lead ingots being   Radiation shield for particlerecovered.          detector made from the ingots.
The importance of underwater archaeological  research
The importance of underwater archaeological  research
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The importance of underwater archaeological research

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Underwater Archaeology Field School.

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The importance of underwater archaeological research

  1. 1. Ben RittSession #4 Underwater Survey 7/5/2012
  2. 2.  3/4of Earth’s surface is water Water-borne transportation has allowed exploration of much of the globe and facilitated the rise and fall of great empires. Beneath the surface of our oceans, lakes, rivers, and wetlands lies a physical record of humankind ;shipwrecks, inundated cities, harbor works, and other traces of our past.
  3. 3.  The majority of underwater archaeologists specialize in the study of nautical archaeology: the study of the construction and operation of all types historic watercraft.
  4. 4.  Other types of sites in include inundated land sites; sinkholes or bogs where people placed offerings or buried their dead; cities and harbors now submerged by sea level change or earthquake; and dwelling, agricultural, and industrial sites along rivers, bays, and lakes.
  5. 5.  Many laws and regulations require that sites be located, inventoried, and studied by qualified archaeologists before they are impacted or destroyed by development.
  6. 6.  Often Submerged sites such as ship wrecks pose a danger to modern human endeavors; shipping lanes, seabed mining, commercial fishing, and oil and natural gas drilling can be affected by submerged cultural resources. Ship hulls can abrade and cut trans-oceanic cables, commercial fishing nets can become entangled endangering crews, and many other dangers to people can arise from submerged material culture.
  7. 7. Trans oceanic cable map Cable layer, $1.6 million
  8. 8.  Studying where and how ships have wrecked in the past has lead to developments in safer marine navigation, with the placement of lighthouses, safety beacons, the marking of dangerous currents on nautical charts.
  9. 9.  120 lead ingots recovered 20 years ago from a Roman shipwreck, 80 B.C. - 50 B.C. off the coast of Sardinia Stored at National Archaeological Museum in Cagliari, southern Sardinia. Over the past 2,000 years the lead has almost completely lost its natural radioactivity. It is therefore the perfect material with which to shield the CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) detector, which Italys National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN)
  10. 10. Lead ingots being Radiation shield for particlerecovered. detector made from the ingots.

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