UpWindDesign limits and solutions for very large wind turbinesA 20 MW turbine is feasibleMarch 2011Supported by:      Desi...
Photo: Nordex       2       March 2011
Contents1. UpWind: Summary - a 20 MW turbine is feasible ................................................................ ...
Contents           3. UpWind: Technology integration.........................................................................
4. UpWind: Research activities ..............................................................................................
Contents           4.5 Work Package 6: Remote sensing .......................................................................
Contract number: 019945 (SES6)Duration: 60 monthsCo-ordinator: Risø National Laboratory - DTUCover picture: www.iStockphot...
Contents           Lulea University of Technology (LTU), Sweden           Council for the Central Laboratory of the Resear...
WORK PACKAGES AUTHORS:Nicolas Fichaux, European Wind Energy AssociationSten Frandsen, Risø National Laboratory – DTUJohn D...
xxx                                                      Photo: Stiftung Offshore Energie/D. Gehrin      1    UPWIND: SUMM...
“ They did not know it was impossible, so they did it.”                                                                   ...
1   UpWind: summary - A 20 MW turbine is feasible               In order to be able to address all shortcomings in an     ...
UpWind methodology –                                                           The lighthouse concept is a virtual concept...
1   UpWind: summary - A 20 MW turbine is feasible               The support structures able to carry such mass placed     ...
Control and maintenance strategies require load sen-                       UpWind demonstrated the need to take the wind s...
1   UpWind: summary - A 20 MW turbine is feasible               The UpWind project worked on ensuring the reliability of  ...
2008                                                                                                                      ...
1   UpWind: summary - A 20 MW turbine is feasible               UpWind: continuous innovation                             ...
In addition to defining a clear way forward for wind              In terms of project financing, UpWind shows the wayenerg...
xxxxxxxx                                                         Photo: Vestas      2    UPWIND: SCIENTIFIC INTEGRATION   ...
UpWind: Scientific integration   1A1 Standards and integration   1A2 Metrology   1A3 Training and education               ...
2   UpWind: Scientific integration               2.1 Work Package 1A1:                                        disciplines ...
Results                                                           The cost model is based on a life-cycle approach        ...
2   UpWind: Scientific integration                    The development of a parametric Multi Model            This set of a...
Subtask C: Development of (pre)standards for the                  associated tests. Proposals will be submitted to theappl...
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines

2,837 views

Published on

20 Megawatt wind turbines are feasible, according to a new report from the EU-funded UpWind project. UpWind explored the design limits of upscaling wind turbines to 20 Megawatt (MW) and found that they would have rotor diameters of around 200 metres, compared to some 120 metres on today's 5 MW turbines. March 2011.

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,837
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
91
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Upwind - Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines

  1. 1. UpWindDesign limits and solutions for very large wind turbinesA 20 MW turbine is feasibleMarch 2011Supported by: Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 1
  2. 2. Photo: Nordex 2 March 2011
  3. 3. Contents1. UpWind: Summary - a 20 MW turbine is feasible ................................................................ 10 The need for the UpWind project: exploring the design limits of upscaling ........................................... 11 UpWind methodology: a lighthouse approach .................................................................................... 13 UpWind: 20 MW innovative turbine ................................................................................................... 14 UpWind: rooted in history ................................................................................................................ 16 UpWind: continuous innovation ........................................................................................................ 182. UpWind: Scientific integration ................................................................................................. 202.1 Work Package 1A1: Standards and integration .................................................................................. 22 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 22 Results ............................................................................................................................................. 23 Subtask A: Reference wind turbine and cost model ........................................................................... 23 Subtask B: Integral design approach methodology ............................................................................. 23 Subtask C: Development of (pre)standards for the application of the integral design approach ............. 25 Subtask D: Integration, review and planning workshops ..................................................................... 26 References ........................................................................................................................................ 262.2. Work Package 1A2: Metrology......................................................................................................... 27 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 27 Results ............................................................................................................................................. 28 The metrology database .................................................................................................................. 28 Advances in metrology .................................................................................................................... 28 Verification of anemometer calibrations ............................................................................................ 29 References ........................................................................................................................................ 312.3. Work Package 1A3: Training and education ...................................................................................... 32 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 32 Results and conclusions..................................................................................................................... 33 Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 3
  4. 4. Contents 3. UpWind: Technology integration.............................................................................................. 36 3.1 Work Package 1B1: Innovative rotor blades (Innoblade)..................................................................... 38 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 38 Results ............................................................................................................................................. 38 Blade aerodynamic design and load calculation................................................................................. 38 Materials selection, structural design and structural verification ......................................................... 39 Sensor monitoring with response actions.......................................................................................... 39 Blade joint ...................................................................................................................................... 40 References ........................................................................................................................................ 41 3.2 Work Package 1B2: Transmission and conversion .............................................................................. 44 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 44 Results ............................................................................................................................................. 44 Mechanical transmission ................................................................................................................. 44 Generators ..................................................................................................................................... 46 Power electronics ............................................................................................................................ 47 3.3 Work Package 1B3: Smart rotor blades and rotor control ................................................................... 48 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 48 Research activities and working methods ............................................................................................ 48 Task 1: Aerodynamic controls and aeroelastic modelling .................................................................... 49 Task 2: Smart structures ................................................................................................................. 49 Task 3: Control systems .................................................................................................................. 50 Task 4: Smart wind turbine wind tunnel model .................................................................................. 50 Task 5: Interfaces ........................................................................................................................... 51 References ........................................................................................................................................ 52 3.4 Work Package 1B4: Upscaling .......................................................................................................... 54 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 54 Activities ........................................................................................................................................... 55 4 March 2011
  5. 5. 4. UpWind: Research activities .................................................................................................... 564.1 Work Package 2: Aerodynamics and aeroelastics .............................................................................. 58 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 58 Research activities and results ........................................................................................................... 59 Structural dynamics — large deflections and non-linear effects .......................................................... 59 Advanced aerodynamic models ........................................................................................................ 59 Aerodynamic and aeroelastic modelling of advanced control features and aerodynamic devices ............ 60 Aeroelastic stability and total damping prediction including hydroelastic interaction ............................. 60 Computation of aerodynamic noise .................................................................................................. 604.2 Work Package 3: Rotor structures and materials ............................................................................... 61 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 61 Results ............................................................................................................................................. 62 Task 1: Applied (phenomenological) material model ........................................................................... 62 Task 3.2 Micro-mechanics-based material model ............................................................................... 63 Task 3.3: Damage-tolerant design concept........................................................................................ 64 Task 3.4: Upscaling — cost factors .................................................................................................. 664.3 Work Package 4: Foundations and support structures........................................................................ 67 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 67 Results ............................................................................................................................................. 69 Task 1: Integration of support structure and wind turbine design ........................................................ 69 Task 2: Support structure concepts for deep-water sites .................................................................... 70 Task 3: Enhancement of design methods and standards.................................................................... 71 References ........................................................................................................................................ 724.4 Work Package 5: Control systems..................................................................................................... 74 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 74 Results ............................................................................................................................................. 75 Supervisory control implications of advanced control ......................................................................... 75 Online estimation of mechanical load for wind turbines ...................................................................... 76 Dual pitch control for out-of-plane-blade load reduction ...................................................................... 77 Identification of wind turbines operating in closed loop ...................................................................... 78 LIDAR-assisted collective pitch control .............................................................................................. 79 Validation of load reducing controllers in full-scale field tests ............................................................. 80 Hardware-in-the-loop testing of pitch actuators .................................................................................. 81 Riding through grid faults ................................................................................................................. 82 Impact of the drive train on wind farm VAR Control ............................................................................ 82 References ........................................................................................................................................ 83 Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 5
  6. 6. Contents 4.5 Work Package 6: Remote sensing ..................................................................................................... 84 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 84 Results ............................................................................................................................................. 85 SODAR – calibration and design improvements ................................................................................. 85 LIDAR testing in flat terrain .............................................................................................................. 86 LIDAR measurements in complex terrain........................................................................................... 86 Power curve testing ......................................................................................................................... 86 IEC 61400-12-1 revision.................................................................................................................. 87 LIDAR turbulence measurements ..................................................................................................... 87 References ........................................................................................................................................ 88 4.6 Work Package 7: Condition monitoring .............................................................................................. 89 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 89 Results ............................................................................................................................................. 90 Optimised condition monitoring systems for use in wind turbines of the next generation ...................... 90 “Flight leader” turbines for wind farms.............................................................................................. 90 Fault statistics ................................................................................................................................ 92 Standardisation .............................................................................................................................. 92 Conclusions ................................................................................................................................... 92 References. ....................................................................................................................................... 93 4.7 Work Package 8: Flow ...................................................................................................................... 94 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 94 Results ............................................................................................................................................. 95 References ........................................................................................................................................ 97 4.8 Work Package 9: Electrical grid ........................................................................................................ 98 Challenges and main innovations ........................................................................................................ 98 Results ............................................................................................................................................. 99 Wind farm reliability ........................................................................................................................ 99 Power system requirements ........................................................................................................... 100 Wind farm electrical design and control .......................................................................................... 101 Upscaling ..................................................................................................................................... 102 6 March 2011
  7. 7. Contract number: 019945 (SES6)Duration: 60 monthsCo-ordinator: Risø National Laboratory - DTUCover picture: www.iStockphoto.comPROJECT PARTNERS:Risø National Laboratory - DTU, Denmark (Risø - DTU), Project CoordinatorAalborg University (AaU), DenmarkEnergy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), The NetherlandsStichting Kenniscentrum Windturbine Materialen en Constructies (WMC), The NetherlandsDelft University of Technology (DUT), The NetherlandsCentre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES), GreeceNational Technical University of Athens (NTUA), GreeceUniversity of Patras (UP), GreeceInstitut für Solare Energieversorgungstechnik Verein an der Universität Kassel (ISET), GermanyUniversität Stuttgart (Usttut), GermanyDONG Energy Power A/S (DONG), DenmarkVattenfall Vindkraft A/S, DenmarkGE Wind Energy Zweigniederlassung der General Electric Deutschland Holding GmbH (GEGR-E), GermanyGamesa Innovation and Technology (GIT), SpainFiberblade Eólica S.A., SpainGL Garrad Hassan and Partners Ltd. (GL GH), United KingdomWerkzeugmaschinenlabor, Aachen University (RWTH – WZL), GermanyLM Glasfiber A.S. (LM), DenmarkGermanischer Lloyd Windenergie GmbH (GL), GermanyRamboll Danmark A.S.(Ramboll), DenmarkFundación Robotiker (ROBOTIKER), SpainVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), FinlandSAMTECH S.A (SAMTECH), BelgiumShell Windenergy BV (SHELL), The NetherlandsRepower Systems AG (REP), GermanyBosch Rexroth AG (BRM-GT), GermanyDet Norske Veritas, Danmark A/S, DenmarkLohmann und Stolterfoht GmbH, GermanyUniversity of Edinburgh (UEDIN), United KingdomInstytut Podstawowych Problemow Techniki PAN (IPPT), PolandInstitute of Thermomechanics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (IT ACSR), Czech Republic Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 7
  8. 8. Contents Lulea University of Technology (LTU), Sweden Council for the Central Laboratory of the Research Councils (CCLRC), United Kingdom Vrije Universiteit Brussels (VUB), Belgium QinetiQ Ltd. (QinetiQ), United Kingdom Vestas Asia Pacific A/S (Vestas APAC), Denmark Smart Fibres Ltd. (SmartFibres), United Kingdom University of Salford (USAL), United Kingdom European Wind Energy Association (EWEA), Belgium Ecotècnia S.C.C.L. (ECOTECNIA), Spain Fundación CENER - CIEMAT, Spain Fraunhofer-Institut fur Windenergie und Energiesystemtechnik (IWES), Germany Institute for Superhard Materials of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (ISM), Ukraine Department of Civil Engineering, Thapar University (TIET), India China University of Mining and Technology (Beijing), State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Mine Safety (CUMTB), China CWMT Fraunhofer (CWMT), Germany SUPPORTED BY: The Sixth Framework Programme for Research and Development of the European Commission (FP6) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AUTHORS: Nicolas Fichaux, European Wind Energy Association Jos Beurskens, Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Peter Hjuler Jensen, Risø National Laboratory – DTU Justin Wilkes, European Wind Energy Association 8 March 2011
  9. 9. WORK PACKAGES AUTHORS:Nicolas Fichaux, European Wind Energy AssociationSten Frandsen, Risø National Laboratory – DTUJohn Dalsgaard Sørensen, Aalborg University and Risø National Laboratory - DTUPeter Eecen, Energy Research Centre of the NetherlandsCharalambos Malamatenios, Centre for Renewable Energy SourcesJoaquin Arteaga Gomez, GamesaJan Hemmelmann, GE Global ResearchGijs van Kuik, Delft University of TechnologyBernard Bulder, Energy Research Centre of the NetherlandsFlemming Rasmussen, Risø National Laboratory – DTUBert Janssen, Energy Research Centre of the NetherlandsTim Fischer, Universität StuttgartErvin Bossanyi, GL Garrad Hassan and PartnersMike Courtney, Risø National Laboratory – DTUJochen Giebhardt, Fraunhofer-Institut fur Windenergie und EnergiesystemtechnikRebecca Barthelmie, Risø National Laboratory – DTUOle Holmstrøm, DONG EnergySPECIAL CONTRIBUTION OF:Dorina Iuga, European Wind Energy AssociationSharon Wokke, European Wind Energy AssociationEDITING:Sarah Azau, European Wind Energy AssociationChris Rose, European Wind Energy AssociationDesign and production: De Visu Digital Document DesignDesign coordinator: Raffaella Bianchin, European Wind Energy AssociationPublished in March 2011LEGAL NOTICE:Neither the European Commission nor any person acting on behalf of the Commission isresponsible for the use which might be made of the following information.The views expressed in this publication are the sole responsibility of the author and do notnecessarily reflect the views of the European Commission. Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 9
  10. 10. xxx Photo: Stiftung Offshore Energie/D. Gehrin 1 UPWIND: SUMMARY A 20 MW TURBINE IS FEASIBLE 10 March 2011
  11. 11. “ They did not know it was impossible, so they did it.” Mark Twain, American novelist, 1835 - 1910The need for the UpWind project: Thus a significant part of the required future installed wind power will be located offshore. For offshore ap-exploring the design limits of plication new technologies and know how are neededupscaling beyond the existing knowledge base, which is mainly fo- cused on onshore applications. Going offshore impliesThe key objective of the European wind industry‘s not only new technologies but also upscaling of windresearch and development strategy for the next ten turbine dimensions, wind farm capacities and requiredyears is to become the most competitive energy source – not yet existing – electrical infrastructure. The needby 2020 onshore and offshore by 2030 1, without for upscaling found its origin in the cost structure of off-accounting for external costs. shore installations and is the “motor” of modern wind energy research. The results will not be applicable toIn October 2009, the European Commission published offshore wind energy technology only, but will also leadits Communication “Investing in the Development of to more cost effective onshore installations.Low Carbon Technologies (SET-Plan)”, stating that windpower would be “capable of contributing up to 20% of Ultimately, all research activities, aside from other im-EU electricity by 2020 and as much as 33% by 2030” plementation measures, are focused on reductions towere the industry‘s research needs fully met. The wind the cost of energy. The industry is taking two pathwaysindustry agrees with the Commission‘s assessment. towards cost reductions in parallel:Significant additional research efforts in wind energy Incremental innovation: cost reductions throughare needed to bridge the gap between the 5% of the economies of scale resulting from increased marketEuropean electricity demand which is currently covered volumes of mainstream products, with a continuousby wind energy, and one-fifth of electricity demand in improvement of the manufacturing and installation2020, one-third in 2030 and half by 2050. methods and products; Breakthrough innovation: creation of innovative prod-Meeting the European Commission‘s ambitions for wind ucts, including significantly upscaled dedicated (off-energy would require meeting EWEA‘s high scenario of shore) turbines, to be considered as new products.265 GW of wind power capacity, including 55 GW ofoffshore wind by 2020. The Commission‘s 2030 target The UpWind project explores both innovation pathways.of 33% of EU power from wind energy can be reached by In formulating the UpWind project the initiators realisedmeeting EWEA‘s 2030 installed capacity target of 400 that wind energy technology disciplines were ratherGW wind, 150 GW of which would be offshore. Up to fragmented (no integrated verified design methods2050 a total of 600 GW of wind energy capacity would were available), that essential knowledge was still miss-be envisaged, 250 GW would be onshore and 350 GW ing in high priority areas (e.g. external loads), measur-offshore. Assuming a total electricity demand of 4,000 ing equipment was still not accurate or fast enough,TWh in 2050 this amount of installed wind power could and external factors were not taken into considerationproduce about 2,000 TWh and hence meet 50% of the in minimising cost of energy (grid connection, founda-EU‘s electricity demand. tions, wind farm interaction).1 http://www.ewea.org/fileadmin/ewea_documents/documents/publications/EWI/EWI_2010_final.pdf Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 11
  12. 12. 1 UpWind: summary - A 20 MW turbine is feasible In order to be able to address all shortcomings in an For instance, the development of control methods for effective way a comprehensive matrix project structure very large rotors requires the full wind behaviour, includ- was designed, where disciplinary, scientific integration ing wind shear and turbulence, to be taken into account. and technology integration were included (see page 18). A key issue for integrating various research results was This in turn means the anemometer values must be developing an overall engineering cost model. corrected based on the rotor effects and therefore ad- vanced wind measurement technologies need to be This unique UpWind approach quantifies the contribu- used. UpWind therefore developed and validated the tion of the different types of innovation resulting from measurement devices and models able to provide such the project. Not only are upscaling parameters incor- measurements (LIDAR). porated, but also innovation effects are defined as a separate independent parameter. At the time of writing UpWind also developed the tools and specified the the full results of the integration process through cost methods to enable large designs. These tools and modelling was not yet available, but will be published in methods are available to optimise today‘s designs, 2011. However, some early conclusions may already be and are used to improve the reliability and efficiency of drawn, such as the benefits of distributed aerodynamic current products, such as drive trains. blade control. UpWind demonstrates that a 20 MW design is feasible. The question often arises whether there is one single No significant problems have been found when upscal- “optimum” technology. UpWind did not seek to define ing wind turbines to that scale, provided some key one unique optimum technology but rather explored var- innovations are developed and integrated. These innova- ious high-potential solutions and integrated them with tions come with extra cost, and the cost / benefit ratio respect to the potential reduction of cost of energy. An depends on a complex set of parameters. The project optimised wind turbine is the outcome of a complex resulted for instance in the specification of mass / function combining requirements in terms of efficiency strength ratios for future very large blades securing the (electricity production), reliability, access, transport and same load levels as the present generation wind tur- storage, installation, visibility, support to the electricity bines. Thus in principle, future large rotors and other network, noise emission, cost, and so on. turbine components could be realised without cost in- creases, assuming the new materials are within certain UpWind‘s focus was the wind turbine as the essential set cost limits. component of a wind electricity plant. Thus external con- ditions were only investigated if the results were needed to optimise the turbine configuration (e.g. grid connec- As the UpWind project‘s scope is very wide and tion options) and the other way around (control options the project has laid the basis for essential future for wind turbines) in order to optimise wind farms. strategies for decreasing cost of energy, UpWind contributed considerably to the recommendations UpWind did not seek the optimal wind turbine size, but of the European Wind Energy Technology Plat- investigated the limits of upscaling, up to, approxima- form and the foundation for the European Wind tely, 20 MW / 250 m rotor diameter. Looking at very Initiative. It is clear from the conclusions of Up- large designs, attention is focused on physical phenom- Wind that the European Wind Initiative‘s research ena or model behaviour that are relevant for large-scale agenda is both feasible and necessary and should structures but have negligible effects at lower scales. therefore be financed without delay by the Euro- pean Commission, national governments and the European wind energy sector. 12 March 2011
  13. 13. UpWind methodology – The lighthouse concept is a virtual concept design of a wind turbine in which promising innovations, eithera lighthouse approach mature or embryonic, are incorporated. The lighthouseFor its assessment of the differences between the pa- is not a pre-design of a wind turbine actually to berameters of the upscaled wind turbine, UpWind adopt- realised, but a concept from which ideas can be drawned a reference 5 MW wind turbine. This reference was for the industry’s own product development. One of thebased on the IEA reference turbine developed by the innovations, for example, is a blade made from thermo-National Renewable Energy Laboratorys (NREL). As plastic materials, incorporating distributed blade control,a first step, this reference design was extrapolated including a control system, the input of which is partly(“upscaled”) to 10 MW. The 20 MW goal emerged fed by LIDARs.progressively during the project, while the industry inthe meantime worked on larger machines. The largest The 20 MW concept provides values and behaviour usedconcepts which are now on the drawing board measure as model entries for optimisation. It is a virtual 20 MWclose to 150 m rotor diameter and have an installed turbine, which could be designed with the existing tools,power capacity of 10 MW. While a 10 MW concept pro- without including the UpWind innovations. This extrapo-gressively took shape, UpWind set its mind to a larger lated virtual 20 MW design was unanimously assessedwind turbine, a turbine of about 250 m rotor diameter as almost impossible to manufacture, and uneconomic.and a rated power of 20 MW. Also the idea of the The extrapolated 20 MW design would weigh 880 tonneslighthouse concept was adopted to present the many on top of a tower making it impossible to store today atresults of UpWind in one image. a standard dockside, or install offshore with the current installation vessels and cranes. Reference wind Extrapolated Extrapolated virtual turbine turbine 5 MW turbine 10 MW 20 MW Rating MW 5.00 10.00 20.00 Wind regime IEC class 1B 2 IEC class 1B IEC class 1B No of blades 3 3 3 Rotor orientation Upwind Upwind Upwind Variable speed, Variable speed, Variable speed, Control control pitch control pitch control pitch Rotor diameter M 126 178 252 Hub height M 90 116 153 Max. rotor speed Rpm 12 9 6 Rotor mass Tones 122 305 770 Tower top mass Tones 320 760 880 Tower mass Tones 347 983 2,780 Theoretical electricity GWh 369 774 1,626 production2 IEC 61400 class IB is an average wind speed at hub height of 10 m/s, V50 extreme gusts 70 m/s, 16% characteristic turbulence, wind shear exponent is 0.2. Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 13
  14. 14. 1 UpWind: summary - A 20 MW turbine is feasible The support structures able to carry such mass placed After reducing fatigue loads and applying materials with at 153 m height are not possible to mass manufacture a lower mass to strength ratio, a third essential step today. The blade length would exceed 120 m, making is needed. The application of distributed aerodynamic it the world‘s largest ever manufactured composite ele- blade control, requiring advanced blade concepts with ment, which cannot be produced as a single piece with integrated control features and aerodynamic devices. today‘s technologies. The blade wall thickness would Fatigue loads could be reduced 20-40% (WP2). Various exceed 30 cm, which puts constraints on the heating of devices can be utilised to achieve this, such as trail- inner material core during the manufacturing process. ing edge flaps, (continuous) camber control, synthetic The blade length would also require new types of fibres jets, micro tabs, or flexible, controllable blade root cou- to resist the loads. pling. Within UpWind, prototypes of adapting trailing edges, based on piezo electrically deformable materi- However, the UpWind project developed innovations to als and SMA (shape memory alloys) were demonstrat- enable this basic design to be significantly improved, ed (WP1B.3). However, the control system only works and therefore enable a potentially economically sound if both hardware and software are incorporated in the design. blade design. Thus advanced modelling and control al- gorithms need to be developed and applied. This was investigated in WP1B3. UpWind: 20 MW innovative turbine Further reducing the loads requires advanced rotor con- Key weaknesses of the extrapolated virtual 20 MW de- trol strategies (WP5) for “smart” turbines. These con- sign are the weight on top of the tower, the correspond- trol strategies should be taken into account in the de- ing loads on the entire structure and the aerodynamic sign of offshore support structures (WP4). The UpWind rotor blade control. The future large-scale wind turbine project demonstrated that individual pitching of the system drawn up by the UpWind project, however, is blades could lower fatigue loads by 20-30%. Dual pitch smart, reliable, accessible, efficient and lightweight. as the first step towards a more continuous distributed blade control (pitching the blade in two sections) could A part of UpWind (WP3) 3 analysed wind turbine materi- lead to load reductions of 15%. In addition, the future als. This enabled the micro-structure of the blade ma- smart turbine will use advanced features to perform terials to be studied and optimised in order to develop site adaptation of its controller in order to adapt to stronger and lighter blades. However, this would not be local conditions (WP5). sufficient unless fatigue loading is also reduced. Advanced control strategies are particularly relevant Reducing fatigue loading means longer and lighter for large offshore arrays, where UpWind demonstrated blades can be built. The aerodynamic and aeroelastic that 20% of the power output can be lost due to wake qualities of the models were significantly improved effects between turbines. within the UpWind project, for example by integrat- ing the shear effect over large rotors WP2. Significant Optimised wind farm layouts were proposed, and inno- knowledge was gained on load mitigation and noise vative control strategies were developed, for instance modelling. lowering the power output of the first row (thus making these wind turbines a bit more transparent for the air UpWind demonstrated that advanced blade designs flow), facing the undisturbed wind, allowing for higher could alleviate loads by 10%, by using more flexible overall wind farm efficiency (WP8). materials and fore-bending the blades (WP2). 3 The reference WP in brackets refers to the specific ‘work package’ or sub-programme fiche provided within this report. 14 March 2011
  15. 15. Control and maintenance strategies require load sen- UpWind demonstrated the need to take the wind shearsors, which were adapted and tested within UpWind. into account for large rotors (WP6 and WP2). The 20To avoid sensor failures causing too much loss of en- MW rotor is so large that the wind inflow needs to beergy output, loss of sensor signals was incorporated treated as an inhomogeneous phenomenon. One pointinto the control strategies (WP5) and a strategy was de- measurement, as recommended by IEC standards, isveloped to reduce the number of sensors. The fatigue not representative anymore. A correction method wasloading on individual wind turbines can be estimated developed and demonstrated within UpWind.from one heavily instrumented turbine in a wind farmif the relationship of fatigue loading between wind tur- The smart control strategies and high resolution mod-bines inside a wind farm is known. The so-called Flight elling described above require a highly accurate windLeader Concept 4 was developed in WP7. measurement, since a small deviation can have a sig- nificant impact on reliability. In the metrology domain,Those load sensors can be Bragg sensors, which were UpWind considerably improved knowledge on windtested and validated within the project (WP7). UpWind measurement accuracy within the MEASNET 5 commu-demonstrated the efficiency and reliability of such nity. Cup anemometers, LIDARs, SODARs and sonicsensors, and assessed the possibility of including optic anemometers (WP1A.2 and WP6) were tested, demon-fibres within the blade material without damaging the strated and improved. UpWind‘s WP1A.2 had access tostructure (WP3). almost all existing wind measurement databases.However, using sensors implies the rotor is only react- The advanced control strategies of smart blades usinging to the actual loading phenomenon. As a result of smart sensors enable loads to be lowered considerably,the system inertia, the load will be partly absorbed. so lighter structures can be developed. The improvedA step further is to develop preventative load alleviation modelling capability means the design safety factorsstrategies by detecting and evaluating the upcoming can be less conservative, paving the way to lighter struc-gust or vortex before it arrives at the turbine. A nacelle- tures (WP1A1). UpWind investigated this path, develop-mounted LIDAR is able to do this (WP6), and can be ing accurate integral design tools that took into accountused as an input signal for the individual blade pitching, transport, installation, and operation and maintenanceor in distributed blade control strategies (WP5). (O&M). Onshore, the transport of large blades is a par- ticular challenge, and UpWind developed innovativeIn recent years, UpWind has been a focal point for LIDAR blade concepts (WP1B1) enabling a component to bedevelopment, and has considerably helped the market transported in two sections without endangering itspenetration of LIDAR technologies. Although LIDARs structural safety or aerodynamic efficiency.are still considerably more expensive than SODARs forinstance, their technical performance, and thus poten- Integral design tools were also developed to improve thetial, is substantial. UpWind demonstrated that LIDARs reliability of the entire drive train (WP1B.2), and to inves-are sufficiently accurate for wind energy applications. tigate the possibility of developing proportionally lighter(WP1A2). LIDARs can be used for the power curve generators for large wind turbine designs. UpWind inves-estimation of large turbines, for control systems, for tigated ten different generator configurations and foundresource assessment in flat terrain, including offshore promising potential weight reductions for permanentand soon in complex terrains (WP1A2 and WP6), and magnet transversal flux generators.for measuring the wind shear over the entire rotor area.4 The "flight leader " is a term used in aircraft technologies. The idea behind the “flight leader turbines” is to equip selected turbines at representative positions in the wind farm with the required load measurement. The flight leader turbines are thus subject to higher, or at least similar, loads to other turbines in a wind farm.5 www.measnet.com Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 15
  16. 16. 1 UpWind: summary - A 20 MW turbine is feasible The UpWind project worked on ensuring the reliability of It will be challenging for the wind energy sector to at- large turbines, in particular for far offshore applications. tract and train the required number of engineers, post- UpWind focused on condition monitoring technologies graduates and PhD students to fulfil its needs. UpWind (WP7) and fault prediction systems. Such advanced sys- focused on training and education (WP1A3), and devel- tems enable fault detection and preventative mainte- oped free of charge advanced training modules on wind nance to be carried out, with a large potential for cutting energy, including the latest innovations in the field. This O&M costs. The reliability of the future large blades can content is distributed through the REnKnow database 6. be assessed using probabilistic blade failure simulation tools (WP3). UpWind: rooted in history Reducing the loads and the nacelle weight enables the offshore substructure design to be optimised (WP4). UpWind is the largest-ever EU-funded research and UpWind developed integrated wind turbine/substructure development project on wind energy. In terms of scope, design tools and investigated optimal offshore substruc- content and volume, the project can be compared to ture configurations according to the type of turbine, type typical national R&D programmes carried out in coun- of soil and water depth. Future deeper water locations tries like Denmark, Spain, the Netherlands and the were investigated and innovative cost-effective designs USA. The UpWind project was made up of 48 partners, were analysed. all leaders in their field, half from the private sector, and half from the research and academic sector. This Progress was made on deep water foundation analy- makes UpWind the largest public/private partnership sis, including the development of advanced model- ever designed for the wind energy sector. ling techniques and enhancements of current design standards which for example become very important The story of the UpWind project starts in 2001. At for floating designs. that time, the 2001 renewable electricity directive (2001/77/EC) was facilitating the rapid growth of wind With the improved intelligence of wind turbines, wind energy in Europe. By the end of 2000, the installed wind farms are operated more and more as power plants, capacity in Europe was 13 GW. Growth was based on providing services to the electricity system, such as 1 to 2 MW wind turbines, the work horses of that time, flexibility and controllability of active and reactive power, and demonstrators of 4 to 5 MW were under develop- frequency and voltage, fault-ride-through or black start ment, showing the potential for upscaling and innova- capabilities (WP9). Those capabilities will allow for sub- tion. Large cost reductions were envisaged. However, stantially increased penetration of wind power in the the wind energy sector needed to considerably acceler- grid in the near future. The future large offshore wind ate its innovation rate if the energy objectives were to farms, far from shore, will be connected to HVDC VSC, be achieved. forming the backbone of an integrated European off- shore grid, and supporting the emergence of a single electricity market. 6 http://www.renknow.net/ 16 March 2011
  17. 17. 2008 250 m Ø 160 m Ø 126 m Ø 126 m Ø ? Rotor diameter (m) 112 m Ø Airbus A380 wing span 80m 15 m Ø 85 87 89 91 93 95 97 99 01 03 05 10 ? 1ST year of operation .05 .3 .5 1.3 1.6 2 4.5 5 7.5 8/10 rated capacity (MW)An innovation accelerator was required that could set the European Wind Energy Technology Platform. TPWindclear pathways for future development and rapidly updated the Strategic Research Agenda and developedtransfer technological advances to the market. In or- an industry-led master plan with a total R&D budget ofder to shape such a vehicle, the wind industry created €6 billion up to 2020: the European Wind Industrial Ini-what was known as a ‘ Wind Energy Thematic Network ’ tiative (EWI). The recently created European Energy Re-(WEN), an initiative supported as a project by the Euro- search Alliance (EERA) reinforces this trend by puttingpean Commission. Through an extended consultation more emphasis on long-term research. The UpWind pro-process, WEN identified the key innovation areas and posal and consortium, financed by the European Com-put forward recommendations to address the declin- mission under the sixth Framework Programme (FP6),ing public R&D funding in the wind energy sector. The was developed in parallel with the creation of the Tech-WEN placed wind energy innovation in the context of nology Platform by the sector involving individual keythe newly adopted Lisbon strategy for the first time 7 : institutions and companies with the European Academywind energy was identified as being able to improve of Wind Energy (EAWE) and the European Wind EnergyEuropean competitiveness. Association (EWEA) as essential catalysers. Building on UpWind‘s achievements, EERA and EWI together coverIn 2005 WEN published a roadmap for innovation, which the main road of designing the European wind energywas the first Strategic Research Agenda for the wind technology of the future and helping to meet the EU‘senergy sector. This document was used as a basis for 2020 renewable energy targets, and beyond.7 One objective was a level of spending of 3% of the EU GDP in R&D in 2010. The Lisbon objective was not achieved, and the strategy was relaunched through the recent Europe 2020 strategy. Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 17
  18. 18. 1 UpWind: summary - A 20 MW turbine is feasible UpWind: continuous innovation These considerations led to a matrix structure shown below. In this structure, scientific and technical disci- UpWind is one of the few integrated projects launched plines are dealt with within horizontal work packages under FP6. Integrated projects were designed to cover (WP‘s), and integration through vertical activities. the whole research spectrum. Due to the broad range The vertical activities are themselves grouped into of innovation challenges to be covered in a single scientific and technology integration work WP‘s re- field, such projects required a high level of coordina- spectively. The earlier mentioned lighthouse approach 8 tion and consistency. Due to their size and complexity, forms the focus of the WP1A.1 Integrated Design high demands were put on the management. An inno- Approach and Standards and WP1B.4 Upscaling. vative management concept was designed, enabling All other WPs provide inputs. research to be carried out on specific issues, both sci- entific and technological ones, while at the same time integration of the results was guaranteed. ch on oa si pr er ap nv s n de io co rd ign at la s de d uc rb da es an la ed s to an d rb on ro st ed d an to si e d at gy g is tiv ro in an egr lo g m al va in t ro ns ar sc t in no In et Sm Tra Tra Up M In WP Number Work Package 2 Aerodynamics and aero-elastics 3 Rotor structure and materials 4 Foundations and support structures 5 Control systems 6 Remote sensing 7 Condition monitoring 8 Flow 9 Electrical grid 10 Management 1A1 1A2 1A3 1B1 1B2 1B3 1B4 Scientific integration Technology integration 8 UpWind investigated a lighthouse vision, which means a vision that defines the options and necessities for future very large wind turbines. 18 March 2011
  19. 19. In addition to defining a clear way forward for wind In terms of project financing, UpWind shows the wayenergy technology, UpWind had the responsibility of forward for public-private partnership instruments.accelerating innovation within the sector. This required The scale of today‘s challenges, and the scarcity ofstrong involvement from the private sector. The involve- resources require developing innovative funding instru-ment in UpWind of leading wind turbine and component ments able to create a leverage effect. Those shouldmanufacturers, as well as software providers, techni- combine funding from the Framework Programmes,cal consultants and energy companies, demonstrated other Community programmes and Member States,the sector‘s high level of maturity. Handling Intellectual private capital, and European Investment Bank instru-Property within large EU-funded projects was secured ments. The future FP8 instruments are likely to be flex-by IP agreements and was dealt with inside the WP ible, with less red tape, and their structure is likelyconcerned. This proved to be a very effective model. to be shaped by the time-to-market of innovation, and able to combine those various sources of funding inThe strategy followed by UpWind was to focus on innova- a coordinated manner. Although UpWind was financedtion with a long-term aim: exploring the design limits of under the FP6, some specific WP activities werevery large-scale wind turbines, in the 10-20 MW range. co-financed by Member State programmes beyond theUpWind used upscaling as a driver for innovation, and financial scope of UpWind. One outstanding example ismoved away from the competitive arena. Along the way, the development of LIDAR remote sensing techniquesthe challenges dealt with in UpWind became a reality, (WP6). This made UpWind the first project within thewith the demonstration of 5 MW turbines, the current European Wind Initiative priorities that complementedtesting of 7 MW machines, and the development of support from the Framework Programmes with coordi-10 MW designs. The innovation developed within the nated calls for proposals from committed countries.project helped solve day-to-day challenges, such as Within EWI, UpWind is used as a reference case forwas the case in the field of WP1B.2 Transmission and such instruments.Conversion. UpWind had an international impact,through the IEA Wind Implementing agreement, wherethe UpWind results are included in several internation-al task activities. Partnerships, especially in the fieldof material research (WP3), were developed with India,Ukraine and China. Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 19
  20. 20. xxxxxxxx Photo: Vestas 2 UPWIND: SCIENTIFIC INTEGRATION 20 March 2011
  21. 21. UpWind: Scientific integration 1A1 Standards and integration 1A2 Metrology 1A3 Training and education ch on oa si pr er ap nv s n de io co s n at la s rd sig de d uc rb an da de la ed to rb on ro an d d st e an to si e d rat gy g is tiv ro in lo g an teg m al va in t ro ns ar sc in no In et Sm Tra Tra Up M WP Number In Work Package2 Aerodynamics and aero-elastics3 Rotor structure and materials4 Foundations and support structures5 Control systems6 Remote sensing7 Condition monitoring8 Flow9 Electrical grid10 Management 1A1 1A2 1A3 1B1 1B2 1B3 1B4 Scientific integration Technology integration Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 21
  22. 22. 2 UpWind: Scientific integration 2.1 Work Package 1A1: disciplines within the same framework. In this frame- work, manufacturing, transport, installation and O&M Standards and integration procedures become design parameters rather than constraints. It enables the system as a whole to be Mr. Sten Frandsen from RisøNational Laboratory - DTU optimised at a design stage. Finally, a large potential died during the month of October 2010. He was the Work for cost optimisation lies in the design safety levels. Package leader of WP 1A1. A probabilistic design of structural wind turbine com- ponents can be used to design components directly, The entire UpWind consortium would like to acknowledge thereby ensuring the design is more uniform and eco- the human and scientific abilities he demonstrated along nomic than that obtained by traditional design using his career. Mr. Frandsen was known as a man express- standards such as the IEC 61400 series. ing and standing for his ideas and his contribution to the UpWind project was invaluable. The challenge is to efficiently update the design stand- ards and to promote the use of an integrated design UpWind demonstrates that an integral design ap- approach. This will ensure consistency between the proach can significantly cut costs for current and up- advanced models and strengthen their integration into scaled products. UpWind was trying to find an optimal wind energy technology, improve the test methods and wind turbine design: cost-effective and with appropri- design concepts developed in UpWind and in turn pro- ate design safety levels, influenced by operation and vide a consistent scientific background for standards maintenance and installation strategies. and design tools. The approach has four parts: Providing a reference wind turbine for ease of com- munication between the work packages and integra- Challenges and main tion and benchmarking of their findings; Development of cost models for upscaling to very innovations large wind turbines (20 MW) – in cooperation with the upscaling work package; The UpWind project needed a baseline case study to Development and definition of an integral design benchmark innovation. UpWind defined a reference method; and 5  MW turbine, adapted from NREL’s 5  MW design. Development of (pre)standards for the application During the project, these reference design parameters of the integral design approach, including interfaces, were extrapolated to a virtual 20 MW machine. This data needs guidelines and proposals for a formal enables a comparison to be made between a virtual international standardisation process. extrapolated 20 MW machine and the UpWind innova- tive 20 MW machine. A cost model was developed in order to isolate and study the dimensioning cost pa- rameters of this upscaled wind turbine. However, as an optimal design should account for the external design constraints, an innovative design approach was devel- oped that includes both technical and non-technical 22 March 2011
  23. 23. Results The cost model is based on a life-cycle approach including all capitalised costs. The main up-scalingSubtask A: Reference wind turbine and cost model parameter is typically the rotor diameter. The costAs reference wind turbine an NREL 5 MW model - was model is basically formulated as function of thisused (see [1]) and improved. An overall framework for design parameter using an up-scaling factor with anan optimal design of wind turbines was formulated, up-scaling exponent (typically 3) and a time-dependenttaking up-scaling and cost modelling into account [2] technology improvement factor.and [3]. The approach is based on a life-cycle analysisincluding all the expected costs and benefits through- Subtask B: Integral design approach methodologyout the lifetime of the wind turbine (wind farm). UpWind addresses the full life-cycle of the large-scale wind turbines of the future, including the technical andThe cost model was developed for wind turbine up- commercial aspects. However, non-technical disciplinesscaling up to 20 MW. These wind turbines are expect- do not use any kind of model that is compatible withed to have a rotor diameter of approximately 250m the technical disciplines. There is a strong need forand a hub height of 153m. A theoretical framework for new design paradigms that are able to account for botha risk-based optimal design of large wind turbines was technical and non-technical disciplines within the sameformulated. Three types of formulation were made: 1) framework so that manufacturing, transport, installa-a risk / reliability-based formulation, 2) a determinis- tion and O&M procedures become design parameterstic, code-based formulation and 3) a crude determin- rather than constraints. A new design approach wasistic formulation. These formulations are described in proposed in UpWind. This approach is based on the[2] and [3]. principles of systems engineering and features ele- ments of Multi-disciplinary Design Optimisation (MDO),In the third formulation (crude, deterministic), generic Knowledge Based Engineering (KBE) and Mono-discipli-cost models are given as a function of the design nary Computational Analysis Methods (MCAM).parameters using basic up-scaling laws adjusted fortechnology improvement effects. There, the optimal The approach requires knowledge on the design pro-design is the one which minimises the levelised cesses of the wind turbine and their subsystems to beproduction costs. The main design parameters are: the captured and written down. The wind turbine techno-rotor diameter, the hub height, the tip speed and where logies currently applied are in this approach, as well asthe wind turbines are placed in relation to one another those being studied and developed within the UpWindin wind farms. In a more detailed approach, the cross- project. The captured knowledge is analysed and trans-sectional dimensions (such as the geometry of the lated into knowledge applications through KBE. Theseblade or the tower), the O&M strategy, or more refined applications address the following areas of the design:input parameters can be included. External designparameters are fixed regarding the size of the wind farm(in terms of MW capacity and / or the geographical areacovered by the wind farm), the wind climate includingthe terrain (mean wind speed and turbulence), wave andcurrent climate (offshore), water depth, soil conditionsand distance from land (or nearest harbour). Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 23
  24. 24. 2 UpWind: Scientific integration The development of a parametric Multi Model This set of automated tools allows new wind turbine Generator (MMG) for existing and new wind turbine concepts to be designed. Furthermore, the tools are concepts. interconnected within what is known as a “Design and Automation of the prepared models and aerody- Engineering Engine” (DEE) [4, 5, 6]. This framework namic and structural analysis of the wind turbine enables the software tools to communicate through components. agents or functions and provides a loosely coupled Automation of the prepared models and aero-elastic demand-driven structure for the DEE. Within the frame- analysis of wind turbine components. work, each tool is considered an engineering service Automation of the prepared models and cost ana- providing functionality to the framework. lysis of wind turbine components including material, manufacturing, transport and installation. Standardisation of a communication framework between the different disciplines. Work package 1 External conditions Economic parameters Analysis Wind turbine within Wind turbine design data WP1 performance Conversion Conversion PROJECT INTERNET SITE Other work packages Wind turbine Analysis Wind turbine design data in other performance WP Figure 1 : The design and engineering engine 24 March 2011
  25. 25. Subtask C: Development of (pre)standards for the associated tests. Proposals will be submitted to theapplication of the integral design approach International Organisation for Standards for all electri-Broad standards were developed and formulated to cal, electronic and related technologies known as “elec-clarify the design requirements of multi megawatt tur- trotechnologies” (IEC) /ISO (International Organisationbines. Special emphasis has been put on probabilistic for Standardisation) and to the European Committeedesign of wind turbines, and recommendations of how for Standardisation (CEN)/European Committee forto implement research results in international design Electrotechnical Standardisation (CENELEC).standards [7]. Special emphasis was put on the synthesis and ex-A high reliability level and significant cost reductions trapolation of design load computations as requiredare required so that offshore and land-based wind in IEC 61400-1, in order to arrive at efficient schemesenergy generation becomes competitive with other for the derivation of design fatigue and extreme loadsenergy technologies. In traditional deterministic, code- (extrapolation of load effects).based design, the structural costs are determined inpart by the safety factors, which reflect the uncertainty The IEC 61400-1 and -3 recommend identifying the 50related to the design parameters. Improved design year extreme component load on the basis of limitedwith a consistent reliability level for all components load simulations through the use of statistical extrapo-can be obtained through probabilistic design methods, lation methods. Such methods are often the cause ofwhere uncertainties connected to loads, strengths and large variations in the extreme design load level. Thecalculation methods are part of the calculation. In prob- possibility of determining a robust 50 year extremeabilistic design, single components are designed to a turbine component load level when using statisticallevel of safety, which accounts for an optimal balance extrapolation methods was investigated, so that thebetween failure consequences, material consumption, 50 year load shows limited variations due to differentO&M costs and the probability of failure. Furthermore, turbulent wind seeds or inflow conditions. Case stud-by using a probabilistic design basis, it is possible to ies of isolated high extreme out of plane loads weredesign wind turbines so that site-specific information also dealt with, so as to demonstrate the underlyingon climatic parameters can be used. Probabilistic physical reasons for them. The extreme load extrapo-design of structural wind turbine components can be lation methodology was made robust through the useused for direct design of components, thereby ensur- of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and simulationing a more uniform and economic design than that data from two widely used aeroelastic codes wasobtained by traditional design using standards such applied. The results for the blade root out of planeas the IEC 61400 series. loads and the tower base fore-aft moments were investigated as those extrapolated loads have shownThe IEC 61400-1 and -3 standards were reviewed wide variability in the past and are essential for turbinewithin the UpWind project, and an assessment was design. The effects of varying wind directions andmade of design load computations and in particular the linear ocean waves on the extreme loads were alsoneeds related to very large wind turbines. The methods, included. Parametric fitting techniques that considertopics and results identified by UpWind create the all extreme loads including “outliers” were proposedneed for the revision or development of international and the physical reasons that result in isolated highstandards for the design of wind energy plants and extreme loads were highlighted [8]. The isolation of Design limits and solutions for very large wind turbines 25

×