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Week 1 -Chapter 1-Introduction of ECE.pptx

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Week 1 -Chapter 1-Introduction of ECE.pptx

  1. 1. Week 1: Introduction of Early Childhood Education BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  2. 2. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education Subtopics for Today! 1. What is ECE? 2. ECE in Malaysia 3. Types of early childhood education setting 4. Characteristics become a preschool teacher 5. Roles for Early Childhood Professionals 6. Contemporary Issues
  3. 3. What is Early Childhood Education? • Serves children birth through age 6 • There various name given to these centres; kindergarten, nursery, day- care, and others. • a) Nursery (0-4 years) • b) Kindergarten (4-6 years) BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  4. 4. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION IN MALAYSIA BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  5. 5. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  6. 6. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  7. 7. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  8. 8. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  9. 9. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  10. 10. Types of early childhood setting BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  11. 11. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  12. 12. • the term child care typically refers to care and education provided for young children during the hours that their parents are employed. • two types of group programs: child care centres and family child care homes. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education Child Care
  13. 13. Preschool • serve 3- and 4-year-olds prior to their entrance into kindergarten • often operate half-day, although extended hours—the school day—are becoming more common. • Two particular types of preschool are designed primarily for children from low-income families: public prekindergarten and Head Start BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  14. 14. Bredekamp. Effective Practices in Early Childhood Education, 2e. © 2014, 2011 by Pearson Education, Inc. All Rights Reserved 1-14 Public Prekindergarten • Funded by state and local departments of education • Fastest growing sector of the field • Improves school readiness Head Start • Federally funded preschool program • Serves children 3, 4, and 5 • Low-income families • Comprehensive services including parent involvement • Promotes school readiness skills Early Head Start • Serves low income mothers, infants, and toddlers • Promotes healthy family functioning Head Start and Early Head Start BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  15. 15. Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education • Serves children with disabilities or special needs • early intervention services for infants and toddlers who are at risk of developmental delay and their families. • This trend, called inclusion providing children with a wide range of learning opportunities, activities, and environments. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  16. 16. Characteristics become a preschool teacher? BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  17. 17. Patient Good and Engaging Personality Energetic Knowledgeable and Up-to-date Flexible Good Listener and Communicator Organized Passion for Teaching Compassionate Innovative BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  18. 18. Roles for Early Childhood Professionals • Teacher as expert on child development and how children learn. • Teacher as instructional leader • Teachers as intentional curriculum planner • Teacher as maximizer of instructional time • Teacher as designer of performance-based accountability for learning • Teacher as literacy and reading expert BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  19. 19. Roles for Early Childhood Professionals • Teacher as integrator of content and technology in the teaching / learning process • Teacher as leader in twenty-first century skills • Teacher as promoter of inclusion • Teacher as collaborator • Teacher as coach and mentor • Teacher as reflective,ongoing learner BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  20. 20. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  21. 21. Why become an early childhood educator? BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  22. 22. • Working with children involves daily interaction and direct responsibility for children’s care and education and includes positions such as classroom teacher or family child care provider. • Working for children involves work that supports children’s development and education, whether in proximity to the children, such as being a child care center director, or at a further distance, such as being a teacher- education professor. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  23. 23. Contemporary Issues • Achievement gaps-individual outcomes • Opportunity gaps-factors contribute to educational achievement. (races, ethnicity, socioeconomic status….) -These gaps occur because minority and low-income children often have fewer opportunities to prepare and develop young learners, reduced access to a high-quality school. • Maternal educational achievement gap BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  24. 24. continued…… • Issues of wellness and healthy living (Dental caries/Asthma/ lead poisoning/vaccine-preventable diseases/diabetes/obesity) • Violence • Bullying (teasing/slapping/pushing/unwanted touch/taking personal belonging/insulting remarks about looks, behaviour or culture) • Abuse • Racism BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  25. 25. Quotes for this week BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  26. 26. References BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  27. 27. BJEC1003 Introduction to Early Childhood Education

Editor's Notes

  • This course serves as a foundation for students to understand the early childhood education with emphasis on historical perspectives, theories, practice, and current trends and developments.
  • https://akjournals.com/view/journals/063/11/4/article-p396.xml

    preschool education in the 1950s focused on children from the upper income classes due to the high service fees charged. Concurrently, there were preschools sponsored and managed by Christian organizations that operate churches (Chiam, 2008). However, this has led to ECCE opportunities being limited to only the rural areas in Malaysia.
  • KEMAS
    The first public preschool in Malaysia was established in the early 1970s by the Department of Community Development (KEMAS) under the Ministry of Rural Development's responsibilities. 
    preschools in the urban areas where there are ‘Rukun Tetangga’ /
    These preschools are commonly known as TABIKA PERPADUAN. 
    The main characteristic of TABIKA PERPADUAN is the encouragement of enrollment of children from various races in Malaysia. 
  • in the form of a pilot project called an ‘annex' to an existing primary school known as ‘prasekolah.'
  • To accommodate work schedules, child care is usually available for extended hours, such as from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
  • https://padlet.com/liaueva/9wp2cihm839kf03y
  • instructional leader
    Classroom and program instruction

    curriculum planner
    Plan the lesson/activity,need to clear what we want to teach, purpose& objective

    maximizer
    Expected to maximize the full length of instructional time with activities and content that provide students with valuable learning experiences every day.

    designer of performance-based
    Evaluate children performance-we need to know what did the children learn? Did the children able to perform well and move to the next level?
  • technology
    We need to know how to incorporate technology when teaching, updated technology knowledge

    Twenty-first-century skills
    Critical thinking/problem solving/creativity

    Inclusion
    Means early childhood education and special education merging together, so, all teachers to have knowledge and skills that enable them to teach in inclusive classrooms.

    collaborator
    Not only teaching in school, we also need to Building relationship with families and community to better understand their children

    Teacher as coach and mentor
    is sometimes necessary to provide strategic support to colleagues that goes beyond collaborating,Coaching and mentoring allow veteran teachers to provide assistance to their more novice peers as they adapt to their new school's values,beliefs,and culture. Coaches and mentors can,for example,share effective teaching strategies or help a new teacher under stand and meet curriculum expectations.

    Teacher as reflective,ongoing learner
    seek ongoing professional learning experiences that enhance the quality of teaching and learning experiences that they facilitate for children
  • So, preschool teacher is……
  • Think of it….
  • Achievement gaps
    Traditionally, low income and minority children have not performed as well as their peers. When they cant perform well, then of course the outcome will also different.

    Maternal educational achievement gap
    Gaps between children of highly educated mothers and children of less-educated mothers
  • Violence
    Gun violence/ domestic violence

    Racism
    Promote cultural diversity in our classroom.
  • http://youtube.com/watch?v=T0HkePBag7Y

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