Making Audiovisual Heritage Accessible and Valuable through EUscreenXL

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Presentation about the audiovisual domain, EUscreenXL and their connection to Europeana, by Erwin Verbruggen &
Joris Pekel at the Joint IASA-BAAC conference in Vilnius, September 2013

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  • The i2010 strategy announced the intention to promote and support the creation of a European digital library which aims to foster growth in the information society and media industries.
    EDLnet was aimed at building a prototype of a cross-border, cross-domain, user-centred service. It was funded by the European Commission under its eContentplus programme, one of the research and development funding streams of i2010.
    The New Renaissance Report by Comite des Sages - about bringing Europe’s cultural heritage online - said ‘All public domain masterpieces should be brought into Europeana’ and that ‘Public funding for digitisation should be conditional on free accessibility through Europeana’.
  • Image is the dominant type
    Text is increasing
    Video and sound are still more challenging and costly to digitise with copyright and production issues
    Europeana actively tries to increase the video and audio content, which is also reflected in its content strategy.
  • Example used is:
    http://preview.europeana.eu/portal/record/90402/174D436CF5C61F8AA999090C98DA48B9C7024087.html
    Een vrouw met een kind in een kelderkamer by Pieter de Hooch, Rijksmuseum, public domain
  • An aggregator in the context of Europeana is an organisation that collects metadata from a group of data providers and transmits them to Europeana. Aggregators also support the data providers with administration, operations and training.
    Europeana aims to create strong partnerships and to support the developments of aggregators on a national level in Europe and of pan-European aggregators representing a specific domain or sector.
    Besides getting direct data contributions from national aggregation initiatives, Europeana gets contributions from pan-European aggregators as, for example, EU-funded projects representing a specific segment or sector, like the Euroepan Film Gateway. These projects enable large amounts of data to be provided to Europeana. The aggregators also improve data, solve language issues and develop new technologies.
  • An aggregator in the context of Europeana is an organisation that collects metadata from a group of data providers and transmits them to Europeana. Aggregators also support the data providers with administration, operations and training.
    Europeana aims to create strong partnerships and to support the developments of aggregators on a national level in Europe and of pan-European aggregators representing a specific domain or sector.
    Besides getting direct data contributions from national aggregation initiatives, Europeana gets contributions from pan-European aggregators as, for example, EU-funded projects representing a specific segment or sector, like the Euroepan Film Gateway. These projects enable large amounts of data to be provided to Europeana. The aggregators also improve data, solve language issues and develop new technologies.
  • At a working level, we operate in a network of aggregators. We can’t work directly with 2,200 organisations, so we rely on aggregators to
    collect data, harmonise it, and deliver to Europeana.
    Aggregators are important because they share a background with the organisations whose content they bring together, so there is close understanding.The aggregation model enables Europeana to collect huge quantities of data from thousands of providers, through only a handful of channels.
  • Europeana’s content providers/aggregators represent or are linked to an estimated 60,000 content suppliers. 2,200 of those are actively supplying metadata via 150 aggregators.
    28 current projects are supplying content on specific content areas for example newspapers, audiovisual records, fashion.
    21 national initiatives are operating or starting in 2013.
    28% of metadata comes from aggregators, 30% from projects and 32% from others such as direct suppliers.
  • EUscreenXL is the pan-European audiovisual aggregator for Europeana
    Exists out of a consortium of television and audiovisual archives
    Consortium goes back four projects in which it has built experience with publishing AV content
  • The mission has always been to bring television heritage to the web
    Now our ambition has grown bigger: we intend to bring
  • In EUscreen made Europe’s television history accessible through its multilingual portal.
    More than 40.000 video clips, documents, photographs and audio recordings from over 20 audiovisual archives across Europe are freely accessible online.
    In EUscreenXL we thoroughly extend this operational Euscreen platform
  • The portal already supports:
    multi-faceted search
    A multi-lingual thesaurus
    Metadata and annotations provided in two languages
  • And linked the collection to Europeana
  • Researchers and archivists have created a series of online exhibitions to help users explore the richness of the EUscreen collection.
    The exhibitions bring a storyline approach to the diverse collection of audiovisual heritage materials
    and provide a narrative context for original source materials from different cultural spheres and eras.
  • “The XL in EUscreenXL”
    31 Partners: leading television archives
    24 Countries
  • Ingesting at least 1.000.000 metadata sets to Europeana.eu
    Giving Europeana comprehensive access to
    basic metadata and digitised audiovisual content
    published online by participating providers
  • Expanding EUscreen’s Core Collection from 40.000 to at least 60.000 contextualized high quality items
    In order to demonstrate historical change and changes in production, Content Providers are encouraged to provide whole series.
    Where this is not possible, episodes or editions within one series (clips or programmes) can be sampled
    by time (at regular intervals) or by topic (around a particular subject or historical theme drawn from the list of ‘Historical Topics’
  • Participatory cultures as challenge and chance for archives and heritage institutions
    3 User Engagement pilots:
    General audience
    Researchers (also in their roles as teachers)
    Creative industry
  • WP3:
    user requirements of end-users
    designs three user engagement pilots
    performs a user centred system and portal evaluation
  • Creating a sustainable European policy for audiovisual heritage
    Facilitating trans-European exchange and (re-)use of audiovisual heritage
    Expanding the network of collaborating institutions
  • Making Audiovisual Heritage Accessible and Valuable through EUscreenXL

    1. 1. Making Audiovisual Heritage Accessible and Valuable Erwin Verbruggen | Sound and Vision, NL Joris Pekel | Europeana, NL 09 October 2013, IASA-BAAC Conference, Vilnius
    2. 2. What is Europeana?
    3. 3. Europeana’s vision and mission  Europeana is a catalyst for change in the world of cultural heritage.  Our mission: The Europeana Foundation and its Network create new ways for people to engage with their cultural history, whether it’s for work, learning or pleasure.  Our vision: We believe in making cultural heritage openly accessible in a digital way, to promote the exchange of ideas and information. This helps us all to understand our cultural diversity better and contributes to a thriving knowledge economy.
    4. 4. History of Europeana  April 2005: Jacques Chirac wrote to European Commission President José Manuel Barroso, recommending the creation of a virtual European library  EC’s Information Society and Media Directorate had been supporting European digital information exchange projects for 15 years  September 2005: publication of EC’s i2010 strategy on digital libraries  2007: European Digital Library Network – EDLnet – began building Europeana, funded under i2010  November 2008: Europeana prototype launched  Summer 2010: prototype became an operational service funded under the EC’s CIP ICT-PSP (Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme)  January 2011: New Renaissance Report published - endorses Europeana as ‘the reference point for European culture online’  September 2012: Europeana metadata released under CC0 waiver, making it freely available for re-use
    5. 5. Europe’s cultural heritage portal  29m records from 2,200 European galleries, museums, archives and libraries  Books, newspapers, journals, letters, diaries, archival papers  Paintings, maps, drawings, photographs  Music, spoken word, radio broadcasts  Film, newsreels, television  Curated exhibitions  31 languages
    6. 6. The Digital Agenda for Europe ‘Europe has probably the world's greatest cultural heritage. Digitisation brings culture into people's homes and is a valuable resource for education, tourism, games, animation and the whole creative industry. Investing in digitisation will create new companies and generate new jobs.’ Europeana is Europe’s ‘flagship digitisation project’ and ‘one of Europe’s most amibitious cultural projects, and a successful one. It is a trusted source for our collective memory and a representation of European cultural heritage online.’ Neelie Kroes European Commission Vice-President for the Digital Agenda
    7. 7. What does Europeana provide?
    8. 8. Europeana data
    9. 9. What makes up a Europeana record? Thumbnail/preview Metadata Link to digital objects online
    10. 10. Why join Europeana        Consultancy and advice on legal and technical issues Tools Europeana Network Trusted source for documentation Continue to set standards on a legal and technical level Highlight and showcase your good work Metrics about usage of Europeana data
    11. 11. Who provides content to Europeana?
    12. 12. How does Europeana get its data?  Through its aggregation structure, Europeana represents 2,200 organisations across Europe  From 150 Aggregators • Promoting national aggregation structures • More efficient than working with every individual content provider • Helps to achieve international standardisation  End-user generated content • Crowd-sourcing projects such as Europeana 1914-1918 and Europeana 1989
    13. 13. Who submits data to Europeana? Domain Aggregators National initiatives Libraries National Aggregators e.g. Culture Grid, Culture.fr e.g. The European Library Regional Aggregators Archives e.g. APEX Audiovisual collections e.g. EUScreen, European Film Gateway Thematic collections e.g. Musées Lausannois e.g. Judaica Europeana, Europeana Fashion
    14. 14. Types of aggregators Cross domain Single Domain National Initiatives National Organisations National Organisations Direct Suppliers National Europeana Projects (themes) Projects (domain) Single Domain organisations Pan-European
    15. 15. Accessing and re-using Europeana data Pan-European Audiovisual Aggregator for Europeana
    16. 16. Television heritage
    17. 17. Based on EBUcore Mapped to the Europeana Data Model MAPPING TOOL Massive uploads Schema Mapping Service ANNOTATION TOOL Item and Group Level Annotation Connection with EUscreen Thesauri Quality Control Europeana Preview Services Search and Browsing Services Metadata
    18. 18. Ongoing: Exhibitions Contextua lisation
    19. 19. Partners
    20. 20. Aggreg ated Co llection
    21. 21. re o C le l o C t c n io
    22. 22. rkshops sig n W o De
    23. 23. Policy & Advocacy
    24. 24. Structure
    25. 25. Dates April 2014 Strategic workshop on awareness in IPR regulations concerning audiovisual material August 2014 First International Conference Info www.euscreen.eu info@euscreen.eu twitter – facebook
    26. 26. Participate 1.Share experience? Access & IPR Survey 2.Online much? Join the network Contact joris.pekel@kb.nl t: jpekel everbruggen@beeldengeluid.nl t: erwinverb

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