Introducción a la service science

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Presentación de IBM en el marco del Acto de inauguración del curso académico 2012-2013 celebrado el 25 de septiembre de 2012

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Introducción a la service science

  1. 1. Service Science, Management, and Engineering (and Design) (and Art)Introducción a la Service Science Jordi Busquets Salome Valero Tomàs Cerdà – Septiembre 20121 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  2. 2. Grado de Informática y Servicios  La ingeniería orientada a la excelencia en los servicios. ¿Hace falta un nuevo ingeniero en el mundo de los servicios?  El sector servicios se ha convertido, en el principal contribuidor del PIB y la principal fuente de ocupación de las economías de los países desarrollados.  Del paradigma industrial centrado en el producto, hacia un paradigma de servicios centrado en el cliente o usuario.  Es en este contexto en el que una nueva disciplina académica, profesional y empresarial aparece: SSME (Service Science, Management and Engineering) y que está redefiniendo el papel de los profesionales y en particular los ingenieros que necesita la economía de los servicios.  UAB e IBM: Acuerdo Marco de Colaboración. Escola Gimbernat i Tomàs Cerdà: Grado de Informática y Servicios.2 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  3. 3. What is Service Science or SSME(D)? Today, SSME is a call foracademia, industry, andgovernments to focus onbecoming more systematicabout innovation in theservice sector, which is thelargest sector of the economy inmost industrialized nations, andis fast becoming the largestsector in developing nations aswell. SSME is also a proposedacademic discipline andresearch area that wouldcomplement – rather thanreplace – the many disciplinesthat contribute to knowledgeabout service.3 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  4. 4. What is Service Science or SSME(D)?Service Science, Management,and Engineering (SSME) is aterm introduced by IBM todescribe Service Science, aninterdisciplinary approach to thestudy, design, andimplementation of servicessystems – complex systems inwhich specific arrangements ofpeople and technologies takeactions that provide value forothers. More precisely, SSMEhas been defined as theapplication of science,management, and engineeringdisciplines to tasks that oneorganization beneficiallyperforms for and with another.4 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  5. 5. Global Service Economy Ten Nations US Employment History & TrendsTotal 50% of World Wide Labor A = Agriculture, G = Goods, S = Services 1980-2010 2010 PC Age United StatesNation A G S Service % % % Growth (A) Agriculture: Value fromChina 50 15 35 191% harvesting natureIndia 60 17 23 28%U.S. 3 27 70 21% (G) Goods: Value fromIndonesia 45 16 39 35% making productsBrazil 23 24 53 20% (S) Services: Value from enhancing theRussia 12 23 65 38% capabilities of things (customizing, distributing, etc.) and interactions between thingsJapan 5 25 70 40%Nigeria 70 10 20 30%Bangladesh 63 11 26 30%Spain 3.4 30 66 53% The largest labor force migration in human International Labor Organization history is underway, driven by global communications, business and technology growth, urbanization and low cost labor5 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  6. 6. Where the growth is… US Gross Domestic Product Products Services Material 11% 30% Information 9% 50% & Organization -Based on Uday Karmarkar, UCLA (Apte & Karmarkar, 2006)6 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  7. 7. Service sector employmentIn 2006 the service sector’sshare of global employmentovertook agriculture for thefirst time, increasing from39.5% to 40%. Agriculturedecreased from 39.7% to38.7%. The industry sectoraccounted for 21.3% of totalemployment. - International Labour Organizationhttp://www.ilo.org/public/english/region/asro/bangkok/public/releases/yr2007/pr07_02sa.htm Fitzsimmons & Fitzsimmons (2008)7 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  8. 8. Knowledge-Intensive Service Activities (KISA) More jobs require expert thinking and complex communication skills 15 Expert Thinking Specialization and 10 Complex integration are both 5 Communication Routine Manual important! 0 Routine Cognitive Fission and fusion -5 Non-routine Manual -10 1969 1974 1979 1984 1989 1994 1999 Percentile change in skill descriptions 1969-1999 Based on U.S. Department of Labor’s Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) From Levy and Marnane (2004), Autor, Levy Marnane (2003) 8 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  9. 9. IBM’s business Revenue Growth by Segment 100 80 Revenue ($B) Services 60 Software Systems 40 Financing 20 0 1982 1988 1994 1998 2004 2008 2010 Year9 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  10. 10. Not just IBM…10 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  11. 11. Why innovation in services matter?11 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  12. 12. IBM IBM Global Services12 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  13. 13. Something about services  Value co-creation  “Servitization” of products  Front-office/Back-office  Customer experience  Complex systems / Service Systems13 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  14. 14. Value co-creation James Teboul, “Services is Front Stage. We are all in services… more or less” (2007)14 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  15. 15. New view of value-creation processes PRODUCTION CONSUMPTION SYSTEM SYSTEM Exchange Process Preparations Behavioral Outcome ValueWith service processes, the responsecustomer provides significant Outputinputs into the production process. Infrastructure -Sampson & Froehle (2006) Goods-dominant logic view PRODUCTION CONSUMPTION SYSTEM SYSTEMThe customer is always a Process Co-productionco-producer. Preparations Outcome -Vargo & Lush (2004) Interactions Contract Service-dominant logic view Paul Lillrank, “An event-based approach to services,”15 Presented at Frontiers in Service Conference, October 2008 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  16. 16. “Servitization” of goods16 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  17. 17. Service Encounter17 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  18. 18. Front-office / Back-office Integrated Product/Service design Customer Front Stage Back Stage Facing Sales Products offering Service mix offering Value Force Information Client Systems Co-creation & Product request Service demand Channels Channel Delivery Technology Product fullfilment18 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  19. 19. Global / Local delivery19 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  20. 20. Mairi McIntyre, Univ. of Warwick20 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  21. 21. Understanding service systems Service  Service is the application of competences for the benefit of another entity Service System  Value co-creation configurations of integrated resources: people, organizations, shared information and technology Service Science  Service science is the systematic study of service and service systems SSME  SSME is a discipline that brings together scientific understanding, engineering principles, and management practices to design, create, and deliver service systems21 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  22. 22. 22 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  23. 23. 23 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  24. 24. 24 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  25. 25. Typical Service Lifecycle  Service Strategy and Planning  Service Design  Service Engineering  Service Development and Project Management + Service Innovation  Service Marketing  Service Delivery and Operations  Service Quality  Service Analysis and Evaluation25 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  26. 26. Service Science principles SCIENCE formality repeatability testability simplicity models simulation26 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  27. 27. Science  Science is the of making hypotheses about the world, and supporting or refuting them with scientific methods  Scientific methods include:  Rigorous and methodical reasoning  Based on repeatable measurements and observations  Using controlled experiments and  The laws of logic and mathematics Einstein: "No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment27 can prove me wrong." © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  28. 28. Sample Hypotheses in Service Science  Customer satisfaction is a good predictor of business growth  A combination of technical and personal skills are necessary for customer facing service providers to achieve high satisfaction ratings  The cost of full refunds to dissatisfied customers is compensated for by return business  Automation of service processes is cost effective in terms of return on investment Hypotheses usually take the form of a mathematical model28 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  29. 29. Something about services… more  Value co-creation  “Servitization” of products  Front-office/Back-office  Customer experience  Complex systems / Service Systems  But many more aspects…  Business Service Modelling / Simulation  Stock, capacity and demand management  Services Quality  Service Design  Service Innovation  Resources management  ….29 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  30. 30. © 2005 IBM Corporation © 2012 IBM Corporation Need more T-shaped people – both deep and broad Science and Engineering Industrial and Systems EngineeringService Education is Interdisciplinary Computer Science & Info. Systems Math and Operations Research Economics and Social Sciences Business Anthropology Organizational Change & Learning Business and Management 30
  31. 31. Need for Academic Curricula Change Business Models Science & & Processes Technology SSME People & Culture The marketplace requires innovation that combines31 people, technology, value and clients © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  32. 32. What Are We Saying?  To Universities  Update your curricula - teach in context around services  Train your students to be more multi-disciplinary with skills in technology, business and people/culture  Help develop new scientific models and algorithms to improve profitability of services businesses  To Governments  Fund University research and curricula for Service Science to help your economy and develop skills for the 21st Century  To Industry Partners  Fund and participate in new Service Innovation Research  Help with University outreach  To IBMers  Get involved with University Outreach for SSME and develop training materials32 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  33. 33. Skills for 21st Century33 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  34. 34. Service Science Discipline Classification System A. General D. Service Management G.Service Arts 1. Service Science Education 1. Service Marketing 1. Service Arts Theory 2. Research in Service Science 2. Service Operations 2. Traditional Service Arts 3. Service Science Policy 3. Service Management 3. Performance Arts 4. History of Services 4. Service Lifecycle 4. History of Service Arts 5. Case Studies 5. Service Innovation Management 5. Service Arts Education 6. Miscellaneous 6. Service Quality 7. Human Resources Management H.Service Industries* B. Service Foundations 8. Customer Relationship Management 1. The Service Industry 1. Service Theory 9. Services Sourcing 2. Utilities 2. Service Philosophy 10. Services Law 3. Wholesale Trade 3. Economics of Services 11. Globalization of Services 4. Retail Trade 4. Theoretical Models of Services 12. Service Business Education 5. Transportation and Warehousing 5. Mathematical Models of Services 6. Information Services 6. Service Complexity Theory E. Human Aspects of Services 7. Finance and Insurance 7. Service Innovation Theory 1. Service Systems Evolution 8. Real Estate and Rental 8. Service Foundations Education 2. Behavioral Models of Services 9. Professional and Technical Services 3. Decision Making in Services 10. Management Services C. Service Engineering 4. People in Service Systems 11. Administrative and Support Services 1. Service Engineering Theory 5. Organizational Change in Services 12. Educational Services 2. Service Operations 6. Social Aspects of Services 13. Health Care and Social Assistance 3. Service Standards 7. Cognitive Aspects of Services 14. Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation 4. Service Optimization 8. Customer Psychology 15. Accommodation and Food Services 5. Service Systems Engineering 9. Education in Human Aspects of Services 16. Public Administration Services 6. Service Supply Chains 17. Other Service Industries 7. Service Engineering Management F. Service Design 8. Service Systems Performance 1. Service Design Theory 9. Service Quality Engineering 2. Service Design Methodology 10. New Services Engineering 3. Service Representation 11. Computer Services 4. Aesthetics of Services 12. Information Technology Services 5. Service Design Education 13. Service Engineering Education Claudio Pinhanez & Paul Kontogiorgis, “A proposal for a service science discipline classification systems,” Presented at Frontiers in Service Conference, October 200834 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  35. 35. University Response  Grado de Informática y Servicios, Escola Gimbernat i Tomàs Cerdà, UAB, Barcelona.  More than 240 Universities in 42 countries are teaching SSME courses  There are more than 102 degree programs in SSME worldwide  Numerous SSME Workshops  24 Service Research Centers Worldwide35 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  36. 36. IBM Systems Journal Dedicated to SSME - 200836 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  37. 37. http://www.ibm.com/university/ssme37 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation
  38. 38. thanks38 © 2012 IBM Corporation © 2005 IBM Corporation

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