Video-resumes in teaching English

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How to make a video resume, presented by Daniela Munca. September 2010.

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Video-resumes in teaching English

  1. 1. Student-made Video Resumes<br />Daniela Munca, PhD<br />ASEM University Lecturer<br />English Language Instructor at ALC<br />
  2. 2. Getting a good job in Moldova is …<br />?<br />
  3. 3. ? <br /> Getting a good job in a competitive organization in Moldova requires job hunters …<br />
  4. 4. Key word: <br />CREATIVITY !!!<br />
  5. 5. Video Resumes by Fox News<br />Task: 1 Watch the Video News and answer the following questions:<br />1. How are video resume created?<br />2. Why did Stanley create a video resume?<br />3. What is employers’ attitude towards video resume?<br />What skills did the video resume require? <br />
  6. 6. How to stand out from the crowd?A Video CV: <br /><ul><li>a short video created by a candidate for employment
  7. 7. uploaded to the Internet for prospective employers to review
  8. 8. describes the individual's skills and experience and is typically used to supplement a paper resume
  9. 9. can be created by a professional or you can create your own
  10. 10. job search and networking sites (Jobster and MyWorkster)</li></li></ul><li>Video resumes (or Video CV)… <br />first introduced in the 1980s for use and distribution via VHS tape, but the idea never took off beyond the video taping of interviews. <br />with the modern capabilities of transmitting streaming video via the internet, video resumes have taken on new popularity.<br />Video resumes are now being widely accepted by companies throughout the world for varying professions<br />
  11. 11. A good teacher makes you think even when you don’t want to.<br />(Fisher, 1998, Teaching Thinking)<br />
  12. 12. CVs for Language Teachers<br />A professional CV is a complex “project”<br />It would require students to develop their English speaking skills<br />It is challenging and at the same time, motivating<br /> It would apply Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy of Learning Domains <br />
  13. 13. Why Video Resumes for Students?<br />Creative project<br />Combine essay writing skills and visuals<br />Challenge students to “think outside the box”<br />Give them an introduction to real world surviving skills<br />Offers teachers an opportunity to asses vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, sentence structure, oratorical skills, etc <br />
  14. 14. What can a <br />student write in a CV?<br /><ul><li>No jobs
  15. 15. No professional experience
  16. 16. No hiring history </li></li></ul><li>
  17. 17. Study Cases<br />Student Sample <br />Video Resume 1 and 2<br />Watch the videos and share opinions with your colleagues<br />
  18. 18. What did the students include in their video CVs?<br /><ul><li>Hobbies
  19. 19. Projects (photography)
  20. 20. Helping parents in an office
  21. 21. Attitude to studying and working
  22. 22. Dreams / plans (I will, I am going to)
  23. 23. Personal qualities (hard working, responsible, etc)
  24. 24. School experience (Head of the class, Day of Administration, French Club, etc)</li></li></ul><li>Pedagogical Implications <br />He who learns but does not think is lost<br />(Chinese Proverb)<br />
  25. 25. Reference to Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy <br /><ul><li>a classification of learning objectives within education
  26. 26. one of the best ways to differentiate the curriculum to meet student needs  
  27. 27. six levels of thinking
  28. 28. can provide a framework for planning units that incorporate low to high-level thinking activities
  29. 29. a planning framework encouraging student thinking at all levels</li></li></ul><li>Teaching EFL involves:<br />Drilling<br />Memorization<br />Reproduction<br />Dictations<br />Recite the poem<br />Lower-thinking Skills<br />
  30. 30. What is Higher-order thinking?<br />A guide to Productive Pedagogies: Classroom reflection manual<br />- involves the transformation of information and ideas<br /><ul><li>occurs when students combine facts and ideas and synthesise, generalise, explain, hypothesise or arrive at some conclusion or interpretation
  31. 31. manipulating information and ideas through these processes allows students to solve problems, gain understanding and discover new meaning</li></li></ul><li>The Teacher’s Task:<br /><ul><li>help students become producers of knowledge
  32. 32. create activities or environments that allow them opportunities to engage in higher-order thinking</li></li></ul><li>Taxonomy of Cognitive Objectives<br />1950s- developed by Benjamin Bloom<br />expressing qualitatively different kinds of thinking<br />adapted for classroom use as a planning tool<br />one of the most universally applied models <br />organizes thinking skills into six levels, from the most basic to the higher order levels of thinking<br />(Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, pp. 7-8)<br />
  33. 33. Initial Taxonomy<br />
  34. 34. 1990s- Lorin Anderson (former student of Bloom) revisited the taxonomy<br />
  35. 35. Original Terms New Terms<br /><ul><li>Evaluation
  36. 36. Synthesis
  37. 37. Analysis
  38. 38. Application
  39. 39. Comprehension
  40. 40. Knowledge
  41. 41. Creating
  42. 42. Evaluating
  43. 43. Analysing
  44. 44. Applying
  45. 45. Understanding
  46. 46. Remembering</li></ul>(Based on Pohl, 2000, Learning to Think, Thinking to Learn, p. 8) <br />
  47. 47. Higher-order thinking<br />BLOOM’S REVISED TAXONOMYCreatingGenerating new ideas, products, or ways of viewing thingsDesigning, constructing, planning, producing, inventing. EvaluatingJustifying a decision or course of actionChecking, hypothesising, critiquing, experimenting, judging  AnalysingBreaking information into parts to explore understandings and relationshipsComparing, organising, deconstructing, interrogating, finding ApplyingUsing information in another familiar situationImplementing, carrying out, using, executing UnderstandingExplaining ideas or conceptsInterpreting, summarising, paraphrasing, classifying, explaining RememberingRecalling informationRecognising, listing, describing, retrieving, naming, finding <br />
  48. 48. Applying <br /><ul><li>Translate
  49. 49. Manipulate
  50. 50. Exhibit
  51. 51. Illustrate
  52. 52. Calculate
  53. 53. Interpret
  54. 54. Make
  55. 55. Practice
  56. 56. Apply
  57. 57. Operate
  58. 58. Interview
  59. 59. Paint
  60. 60. Change
  61. 61. Compute
  62. 62. Sequence
  63. 63. Show
  64. 64. Solve
  65. 65. Collect
  66. 66. Demonstrate
  67. 67. Dramatise
  68. 68. Construct
  69. 69. Use
  70. 70. Adapt
  71. 71. Draw </li></ul>Using strategies, concepts, principles and theories in new situations<br />Products include:<br /><ul><li> Photograph
  72. 72. Illustration
  73. 73. Simulation
  74. 74. Sculpture
  75. 75. Demonstration
  76. 76. Presentation
  77. 77. Interview
  78. 78. Performance
  79. 79. Diary
  80. 80. Journal </li></li></ul><li>Classroom Roles for Applying <br />Teacher roles<br />Shows<br />Facilitates<br />Observes<br />Evaluates<br />Organises<br />Questions <br />Student roles<br />Solves problems<br />Demonstrates use of knowledge<br />Calculates<br />Compiles<br />Completes<br />Illustrates <br />Constructs <br />Active recipient<br />
  81. 81. Applying: Potential Activities and Products<br />Practise a play and perform it for the class<br />Make a diorama to illustrate an event<br />Write a diary entry<br />Make a scrapbook about the area of study.<br />Take and display a collection of photographs on a particular topic.<br />Make up a puzzle or a game about the topic.<br />Write an explanation about this topic for others.<br />Continue the story…<br />
  82. 82. Analysing<br />The learner breaks learned information into its parts to best understand that information.<br /><ul><li>Comparing
  83. 83. Organising
  84. 84. Deconstructing
  85. 85. Attributing
  86. 86. Outlining
  87. 87. Finding
  88. 88. Structuring
  89. 89. Integrating</li></ul> <br />Can you break information into parts to explore understandings and relationships?<br />
  90. 90. Analyzing: Potential Activities and Products<br />Use a Venn Diagram to show how two topics are the same and different<br />Design a questionnaire to gather information.<br />Survey classmates to find out what they think about a particular topic. Analyse the results.<br />Classify the actions of the characters in the book<br />Make a family tree showing relationships.<br />Write a biography of a person studied.<br />Prepare a report about the area of study.<br />
  91. 91. Evaluating<br />The learner makes decisions based on in-depth reflection, criticism and assessment.<br /><ul><li>Checking
  92. 92. Hypothesising
  93. 93. Critiquing
  94. 94. Experimenting
  95. 95. Judging
  96. 96. Testing
  97. 97. Detecting
  98. 98. Monitoring</li></ul>  Can you justify a decision or course of action?<br />
  99. 99. Evaluating cont’<br /><ul><li>Judge
  100. 100. Rate
  101. 101. Validate
  102. 102. Predict
  103. 103. Assess
  104. 104. Score
  105. 105. Revise
  106. 106. Infer
  107. 107. Determine
  108. 108. Prioritise
  109. 109. Tell why
  110. 110. Compare
  111. 111. Evaluate
  112. 112. Defend
  113. 113. Select
  114. 114. Measure
  115. 115. Choose
  116. 116. Conclude
  117. 117. Deduce
  118. 118. Debate
  119. 119. Justify
  120. 120. Recommend
  121. 121. Discriminate
  122. 122. Appraise
  123. 123. Value
  124. 124. Probe
  125. 125. Argue
  126. 126. Decide
  127. 127. Criticise
  128. 128. Rank
  129. 129. Reject</li></ul>Judging the value of ideas, materials and methods by developing and applying standards and criteria.<br />Products include:<br /><ul><li> Debate
  130. 130. Panel
  131. 131. Report
  132. 132. Evaluation
  133. 133. Investigation
  134. 134. Verdict
  135. 135. Conclusion
  136. 136. Persuasive speech</li></li></ul><li>Classroom Roles for Creating<br />Teacher roles<br />Facilitates<br />Extends <br />Reflects<br />Analyses<br />Evaluates <br />Student roles<br />Designs<br />Formulates<br />Plans<br />Takes risks<br />Modifies<br />Creates<br />Proposes<br />Active participant<br />
  137. 137. Creating Video Resumes Task <br />
  138. 138. Video Resumes require students to …<br /><ul><li>Create a video which would present their best skills, achievements, qualities, talents, etc.
  139. 139. Convince a potential audience that they are or could be valuable employees
  140. 140. Develop presentation skills - The video is placed on a public website, which would make it accessible to a very large audience
  141. 141. Use various video, graphic, audio materials
  142. 142. Take a self “critical” approach
  143. 143. Engage creatively in a rather complex, challenging project
  144. 144. Learn real-world survival skills</li></li></ul><li>Creating Video Resumes<br />
  145. 145. Daniela Munca<br />danielamunca@olemiss.edu<br />

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