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Summarizing web-inar

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Shaping the way we teach webinars, presented by Elena Rusu at the ETRC

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Summarizing web-inar

  1. 1. Summarizing WebinarsShaping our way to teach<br />
  2. 2. BYTHE END OF THIS SEMINAR, YOU WILL BE ABLE TO:<br />i.Define and distinguish between ice breakers and warm ups<br />ii.List the reasons for using ice breakers and warm ups<br />iii.Identify best practices, including when and how to use activities with teens<br />iv.Create a list of some examples PBL<br />
  3. 3. According to brain-based learning theory, we learn better when we are relaxed <br />The human brain functions more effectively and at a higher level when stress is reduced<br />
  4. 4. Theory 1: Activity is learning<br />Theory 2: Learning involves the whole body/mind<br />Theory 3: Learning is shared<br />
  5. 5. Ice breakers are a way for learners to get to know each other<br />
  6. 6. ICEBREAKERS<br />Must <br />Enable students to get to know each other <br />Allow for plenty of communication<br />Should <br />Be easy activities with <br />few rules<br />Be fun!<br />Can <br />Be loud or quiet activities<br />Use speaking, listening, reading and/or writing<br />Be separate from lesson<br />Involve mother tongue<br />
  7. 7. Examples <br />Question swamp<br />Find someone who…<br />Picture me<br />Line up<br />Ball toss<br />
  8. 8. WARM UPS<br />•Set the tone for the lesson <br />•Focus learners on the class <br />•Activate learners’ schema <br />•Introduce topic for the day <br />•Provide structure to lesson <br />•Create autonomy<br />
  9. 9. WARM UPS<br />Must be <br />In English<br />Should be <br />Kept under 10 minutes<br />Easy activities with few rules<br />Connected to the lesson <br />Communicative<br />Can be<br />Loud or quiet activities<br />Speaking and listening or reading and writing<br />
  10. 10. WHEN DO WARM UPS?<br />At the beginning of any class<br />To give the students a break<br />Before starting a new topic or grammar point<br />To wake up sleepy students<br />
  11. 11. Examples <br />Circulating story<br />Listening for a song<br />Reading for a story<br />Sentence completion<br />Who am I?<br />Simon says<br />What do these objects have in common?<br />
  12. 12.
  13. 13. 12-14 years<br />•Natural egoism<br />•Emotional and melodramatic<br />•Extreme physical changes<br />•Sensitive to appearance<br />•Want to belong to the “pack”<br />•Influenced by peers and fads<br />•Wavering between independence and need for security<br />•Think they have “figured things out”<br />•Strive to create a “system” to analyze what they see<br />•Test hypotheses and think critically about abstract ideas and concepts<br />•Strong opinions<br />•See things in black and white<br />
  14. 14. 14-17 years<br />•Physically mature<br />•Able to work independently<br />•Good planners and can manage group work without much supervision<br />•Less reliant on the group for support<br />•More focus on individual relationships<br />•Stronger sense of place in society<br />•Aware of the opposite sex and begin to mix groups (girls and boys)<br />•Understand there is not only one answer to every question and not everything is black and white<br />
  15. 15. APPROACH TO TEACHING TEENS<br />Engage teens by creating language awareness activities which foster an understanding of, and an interest in, how language function.<br />Encourage students to become precise critical thinkers and to link their language study to other areas of their education.<br />Promote group work and collaborative learning through class projects.<br />(LEWIS, 2007)<br />
  16. 16. 12 things to keep in mind<br />Bring (pop) music into the classroom<br />2.Find cool, up-to-date topics<br />3.Use group work<br />4.Use role-play activities<br />5.Encourage learner autonomy<br />6.Find ways to bring in students’ outside interests<br />7.Liven up your class with variety and humor<br />8.Give students a chance to move around<br />9.Use effective classroom management<br />10.Use of mother tongue strategically<br />11.Use games and competition<br />12.Use project work<br />
  17. 17. PUTTING THE LEARNER AT THE CENTER (LEWIS, 2007)<br />Take an interest in your students’ lives:“Teenagers, especially younger ones, are the center of their own attention. Ask questions about the student. How do they feel? What do they think?”<br />Encourage students to be honest and candid:“Afford opportunities for students to express their opinions.”<br />Make students responsible for their actions:“Teenagers strive to be independent. They want more responsibility. Grant this and all the rights and obligations it implies, but hold students accountable for both their work and their behavior.”<br />Get students involved in setting class goals:“Negotiate the syllabus with your students. Allow students to make suggestions about how to conduct activities… Give students choices.”<br />
  18. 18. Examples of activities<br />The director’s cut<br />Sample Dialogue<br />Real life communication<br />Personal stories<br />Non-verbal storytelling<br />Digital stories<br />Teacher for a day<br />Project based instruction<br />
  19. 19. BENEFITS OF PBL<br />Enabling students to make and see connections between disciplines<br />Providing opportunities to contribute to their school or community<br />Increasing self-esteem. (Jobs for the Future, n.d.)<br />Allowing children to use their individual learning strengths and diverse approaches to learning(Thomas, 1998)<br />Providing a practical, real-world way to learn to use technology (Kadel, 1999; Moursund, Bielefeldt, & Underwood, 1997).<br />
  20. 20. BENEFITS OF PBL<br />Enabling students to make and see connections between disciplines<br />Providing opportunities to contribute to their school or community<br />Increasing self-esteem. (Jobs for the Future, n.d.)<br />Allowing children to use their individual learning strengths and diverse approaches to learning(Thomas, 1998)<br />Providing a practical, real-world way to learn to use technology (Kadel, 1999; Moursund, Bielefeldt, & Underwood, 1997).<br />
  21. 21. Develops 21st-Century Skills<br />Collaboration<br />Problem solving<br />Negotiating<br />Critical thinking<br />Digital literacy<br />Global awareness<br />Adaptability/self-direction<br />
  22. 22. Sources of Feedback<br />1.Teacher: teacher gives summative and formative feedback.<br />2.Peer: students give each other feedback about content and form.<br />3. Self: students reflect on what they did, what went well and what they might change<br />
  23. 23. Thank you for your attention<br />

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