Learning Session 2-2 Get the best of both worlds Apprenticeship and a College Degree (2 of 2)

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Apprenticeship gives concrete, hands-on skills that can be put to work in a chosen occupation. A college degree opens up a wide range of opportunities for advancement and career flexibility. Each offers an official credential certifying participants’ skills and knowledge. Together, they can provide young adults with a unique and valuable education. In this workshop Jeanine Nagrod, Executive Director of NJ Place, at Rutgers University, and Liem Tran, of the Wentworth Institute of Technology, will describe how their programs are designed to enable young adults to attain both.

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  • Intro
  • New Jersey Pathways Leading Apprentices to a College Education (NJ PLACE) is a statewide collaboration promoting apprenticeship not as an alternative to a college education, but as an exciting and promising pathway to it. NJ PLACE’s goal is to remove the wall that traditionally separates vocational and academic courses of study.  We do this by valuing the skills that people attain through apprenticeship and reward it with the possibility of earning meaningful college credit.  Discuss student tracking - college vs. work New understanding of apprenticeship and other experiential learning - not as an alternative to a college education, but as a pathway to a college degree.
  • Our mission is to create degree pathways in our state’s public education system by stacking our highly-skilled registered apprenticeship programs with our public colleges’ coursework into an associate degree developed specifically for apprenticeship -- AAS in Technical Studies. This portion of the workshop will describe how NJ PLACE is transforming the traditional college pathway by combining experiential and academic education and hopefully give you some food for thought on how you can replicate our model in your area.
  • Background: NJ PLACE is a statewide collaboration among a number of partners Began in late 2004 a statewide program of the NJ State Employment and Training Commission (SETC) funded by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development (LWD) administered by the University College Community at Rutgers – a unit dedicated to Rutgers’ non-traditional and adult students Supported by NJ's 19 Community colleges, organized labor, employer associations, federally registered apprenticeship programs, educational institutions, and several state agencies.  Expanded to 12 apprenticeship program partners representing 17 apprenticeable trades, and that list is growing. Lead in: Together, our stakeholders developed a statewide model to award college credit for graduates of participating registered apprenticeship programs.
  • Classroom component of apprenticeship varies by sponsor – recall Donna’s presentation Many examples around country of colleges giving credit for their own certificates and non-credit training that’s part of an apprenticeship. NJ PLACE has these too – not discussing today. NJ PLACE is unique in way we have statewide agreement in a very autonomous post-secondary education structure: Largest apprenticeship partners providing their own instruction Community colleges are autonomous – no centralized system This is where we began to develop our model – the most difficult circumstances – so this is what I’ll describe today.
  • Translating apprenticeship into college credits is a two step process When an apprenticeship’s classroom training is provided outside of a college setting, Step 1 is to evaluate it for college credit equivalency. Step 2 is to turn the evaluation into reality. The NJ PLACE model uses articulation agreements to accomplish this. Go into detail on steps in next slides.
  • Step 1. Rigorous Evaluation of Apprenticeship Training Programs When a registered apprenticeship program provides it’s own classroom instruction or uses a non-college training provider… rigorous review from a third party evaluation service. National – ACE, National Clg Credit Recommendation Svc (PONSI) NJ- TESC The evaluation teams review each apprenticeship program’s: curriculum and materials teaching objectives learning assessment tools Instructor credentials record keeping practices teaching environments and more Once the review is complete: the team determines the credit hour equivalent for each course with a formal, written recommendation. Usually available on-line. (our partners’ are on our website)
  • College credit recommendations are important, BUT it’s only a recommendation until accepted and placed on a student’s transcript. Brings to Step 2 . Articulation of Credit Recommendations into College Degree Programs 1st, create a degree where credits could most easily go. Multi-year process for common Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in Technical Studies degree Then, broker articulation agreements between 19 colleges and participating apprenticeship programs specify a minimum number of credits from the recommendations which the college has agreed to count toward the degree, as well as a recommended course of study For current programs, minimum of 25 credits To complete the requirements for this degree, apprentices will take: a core of general education courses (math, science, social science, English, and humanities) career elective courses. Some schools offer students and opportunity to concentrate these electives in construction management or business management. HIGHLIGHT: Bergen County College - construction management concentration - 9 credits counts toward degree, & certificate Individual colleges may go beyond established floor: allow a student to transfer more than the minimum credits on a case-by-case basis Agreement by trade
  • Remember this picture? Articulations Agreements stack apprenticeship education with additional college coursework missing from apprenticeship to equal college degree.
  • Made this accessible by establishing common NJ PLACE principles among NJ’s Community Colleges – unprecedented Purpose: facilitate degree completion for apprentices who may live, work, or attend apprenticeship classes in different counties In-county tuition rates : Regardless of county of residence, NJ PLACE participants qualify for in-county tuition rates at the community college in which they enroll. For example, if participants want to enroll in the college closest to their training center, or participants want to enroll in a college offering a degree concentration unavailable in their home county, they can do so without being penalized financially. Location flexibility : Participants can take credit classes at any NJ community college and the community college in which they’re enrolled will consider those classes “native” credits as long as they offer the same course. For example, participants can take general education courses at the community college most convenient to their home or jobsite, even if they’ve enrolled at a different community college, and the courses will still count toward their degree. With enough student interest, a training center may be able to host community college courses too.
  • Moved NJ PLACE’s home from the NJCCC to Rutgers to open up a dialogue about creating pathways to bachelor degrees at NJ’s 4-year institutions. First success – 2009- Rutgers’ School of Management and Labor Relations created the first pathway for apprentices completing their AAS in Technical Studies to the school’s Bachelor of Science in Labor and Employment Relations. Further expansion was a challenge b/c AAS was not addressed in transfer law. Changed - NJ PLACE participants graduating with an AAS in Technical Studies now part of the transfer law. The amendment to the law took effect in 2011. This law opens the doorway to creating bachelor degree pathways at the colleges that fit our target population’s needs NJ PLACE Presentation to NNJFS&H Council 9/14/2011
  • Marrying Apprenticeship and College Worlds Learn each other’s lingo Understand each side’s goals and find common ground Identify Risk-Takers Participant Enrollment Answering “WHY?” Paying for college - $ is tight in this economy (time is tight in good economy) - Time commitment Placement Testing Credit Evaluation Finding economical state-based solution – challenging in a decentralized system, but not impossible NJ PLACE Presentation to NNJFS&H Council 9/14/2011
  • If you want to get started with an initiative like this in your state: 1. Low hanging fruit: ID apprenticeship programs using colleges for classroom instruction 2. Next: ID apprenticeship programs using national curriculum already evaluated for college credit equivalency 3. Whatever you do, be sure to involve multiple stakeholders and treat as them as a coalition – have someone at the helm who knows how to balance their different interests and perspectives, speaks all the languages, and can find common ground. 4. Find the Risk-Takers and Take the Risks! No one makes progress by sitting on their hands.
  • Encourage exploring website
  • Learning Session 2-2 Get the best of both worlds Apprenticeship and a College Degree (2 of 2)

    1. 1. Presented by Jeanine Nagrod Executive Director
    2. 2. Use apprenticeship as a pathway to a college degree by removing the wall that traditionally separates vocational and academic courses of study.
    3. 3. Apprenticeship Certificate College Coursework: General Ed + Electives AAS in Technical Studies
    4. 4. <ul><li>Relevant State Government Departments/Commissions </li></ul><ul><li>US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship </li></ul><ul><li>State County College Consortium </li></ul><ul><li>All 19 NJ Community Colleges </li></ul><ul><li>State University </li></ul><ul><li>Labor Organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Employer Representatives </li></ul><ul><li>Apprenticeship and Training Programs </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>Automotive Technicians </li></ul><ul><li>Carpenters </li></ul><ul><li>Certified Nursing Assistants </li></ul><ul><li>Culinary Workers </li></ul><ul><li>Electrical Workers </li></ul><ul><li>HVAC Refrigeration Technicians </li></ul><ul><li>Insulators </li></ul><ul><li>Iron Workers </li></ul><ul><li>Plumbers </li></ul><ul><li>Sheet Metal Workers </li></ul><ul><li>State Corrections Officers </li></ul><ul><li>Steamfitters </li></ul>Avenues for Partner Expansion: Stage Technicians, Health Care, Advanced Manufacturing, Childcare, and more
    6. 6. <ul><li>Rigorous Evaluation of Apprenticeship Training Programs for College Credit </li></ul>Articulation of Credit Recommendations into College Degree Programs
    7. 7. <ul><li>Review each apprenticeship program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>curriculum and materials </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>teaching objectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>learning assessment tools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instructor credentials </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>record keeping practices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>teaching environments </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Determine credit hour equivalent for each course in the apprenticeship program </li></ul><ul><li>Make formal, written recommendation </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>Developed common Associate of Applied Science (AAS) in Technical Studies degree program </li></ul><ul><li>Boiler-plate statewide articulation agreements between 19 colleges and participating apprenticeship programs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>transfer a minimum number of apprenticeship credits based upon evaluation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Apprentices take general education and career electives </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Individual colleges may go beyond the minimum </li></ul>
    9. 9. Apprenticeship Certificate College Coursework: General Ed + Electives AAS in Technical Studies
    10. 10. <ul><li>Purpose : facilitate degree completion for apprentices who may live, work, or attend apprenticeship classes in different counties </li></ul><ul><li>In-county tuition rates regardless of county residence </li></ul><ul><li>Location flexibility among the community colleges for completing remaining courses. </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><ul><li>Rutgers’ SMLR created 1 st pathway to B.S. in Labor and Employment Relations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NJ PLACE incorporated into NJ Transfer law </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opens doorway to creating more bachelor degree pathways around NJ </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>Marrying Apprenticeship and College Worlds </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn each other’s lingo </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Understand each side’s goals and find common ground </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify Risk-Takers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Participant Enrollment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Why do I need a degree?” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Paying for College </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time commitment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Placement Testing </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Credit Evaluation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finding economical state-based solution </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. <ul><li>ID apprenticeship programs using colleges for classroom instruction </li></ul><ul><li>ID apprenticeship programs using national curriculum already evaluated for college credit equivalency </li></ul><ul><li>Involve multiple stakeholders and treat as coalition </li></ul><ul><li>Find the Risk-Takers and Take the Risks! </li></ul>
    14. 14. Faculty Director: Susan J. Schurman, Ph.d. Executive Director: Jeanine Nagrod, M.L.I.R. NJ PLACE University College Community Continuing Studies Conference Center 178 Ryders Lane New Brunswick, NJ 08901 Phone: 732-932-7924 Fax: 732-932-7872 [email_address] www.njplace.com

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