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Introduction workshops

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From Benedict Wauters (ESF Flanders)

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Introduction workshops

  1. 1. Europees Sociaal Fonds Back to yesterday morning… Reflecting on the A&E case
  2. 2. CRESSI and A&E • Functioning: hospital staff want to do their daily jobs without threats of non-physical aggressive behaviour (SECURITY) – They value this – There is widespread agreement they have reason to do so • Capability: – people are constrained on a daily basis regarding this functioning – can the opportunities for staff to engage in that functioning be expanded? – can staff do that themselves (exert agency)?
  3. 3. CRESSI and A&E • What does it work on? – internal conversion factors are individual ones (physical, mental characteristics) • Some staff may have greater difficulty coping with the threat than others – “external conversion factors relate to constraints deriving from social or family dynamics, formal rules or informal regulations (culture) as well as our physical environment” • This is the hospital environment – agency= staff capacity to create new possibilities to engage in the functioning The whole service design process is a way to do that, tackling… …cognitive frames: “aggression” is just an unavoidable fact of life in A&E?… …social capital: staff work with patients, experts, designers, management… …institutions: change the “patterns of behaviour” in A&E
  4. 4. CRESSI and A&E • What does it work on? – internal conversion factors are individual ones (physical, mental characteristics) • Some staff may have greater difficulty coping with the threat than others – “external conversion factors relate to constraints deriving from social or family dynamics, formal rules or informal regulations (culture) as well as our physical environment” • This is the hospital environment – agency= staff capacity to create new possibilities to engage in the functioning People project: concepts for staff to recover from the stresses of the workplace Guidance project: lower the likelihood of having to deal with aggression on the workfloor People project: a system for more established staff members to promote reflection on managing violence and aggression
  5. 5. CRESSI and A&E • Did the project enhance? – Power over: ability to resist manipulation by others (e.g. patients) – Power to: create new possibilities – Power with: to act in groups i.e. changing aspects in one’s life at group level – Power from within: to enhance self-respect and self-acceptance Should be part of impact evaluation
  6. 6. TRANSIT and A&E • The project delivers a new service (aggression management) to a newly conceptualised need in the hospital context for staff
  7. 7. TRANSIT and A&E • But it does not challenge fundamentally how the care process in A&E actually functions… • The project is not creating a “niche” to challenge the regime, nor is this always needed -only when the current system is unsustainable
  8. 8. Europees Sociaal Fonds Back to yesterday morning… Reflecting on Ideas 42 higher education interventions
  9. 9. CRESSI and Ideas 42 • Functioning: young people want to engage in proper education to achieve their potential in life • They value this – There is widespread agreement they have reason to do so • Capability: – young people are constrained: many do not access tutoring, financial aid… though these “resources” are there equally for all – can the opportunities to engage in the functioning be expanded? – can young people do that themselves (exert agency)?
  10. 10. CRESSI and ideas 42 • What do they work on? – internal conversion factors are individual ones (physical, mental characteristics) • Some young persons may have greater difficulty with self-control than others and hence keep delaying on FAFSA, … – “external conversion factors relate to constraints deriving from social or family dynamics, formal rules or informal regulations (culture) as well as our physical environment” • Some young persons have more friends that tell them that they delay on FAFSA (hence they also delay) – agency= their capacity to create new possibilities to engage in the functioning Typically, Ideas 42 engages with contexts where resources are already there (e.g. financial aid, tutors), people are just not using them due to “human nature”. They do not “choose” to delay FAFSA, it rather “happens” to them; Ideas 42 in this case helps people to create new opportunities to get educated by dealing with human nature
  11. 11. CRESSI and ideas 42 • What do they work on? – internal conversion factors are individual ones (physical, mental characteristics) • Some young persons may have greater difficulty with self-control than others and hence keep delaying on FAFSA, … – “external conversion factors relate to constraints deriving from social or family dynamics, formal rules or informal regulations (culture) as well as our physical environment” • Some young persons have more friends that tell them that they delay on FAFSA (hence they also delay) – agency= their capacity to create new possibilities to engage in the functioning The whole IDEAS 42 process is a way to do that, tackling… …cognitive frames: “college” is bit for people like me (that find FAFSA hard) …social capital: ideas 42 works with teachers, families, young people,… …institutions: change the “patterns of behaviour” regarding access to FAFSA, tutoring,…
  12. 12. CRESSI and Ideas 42 • Did the project enhance? – Power over: ability to resist manipulation by others (e.g. friends) – Power to: create new possibilities – Power with: to act in groups i.e. changing aspects in one’s life at group level – Power from within: to enhance self-respect and self-acceptance Should be part of impact evaluation
  13. 13. TRANSIT and Ideas 42 • The project delivers incremental innovation • But the approach can be used to strengthen all kinds of innovation
  14. 14. TRANSIT and ideas 42 • But it does not challenge fundamentally the process of supporting low income youngsters to get educated … • The project is not creating a “niche” to challenge the regime, nor is this always needed -only when the current system is unsustainable
  15. 15. Europees Sociaal Fonds Workshops International seminar on supporting social innovation with the European Social Fund 26-27th October 2015 , Brussels, Hotel Bloom
  16. 16. Our “gift” to you
  17. 17. Videos (quick intro’s) • Video 1: Guy Kawasaki and the art of innovation • Video 2: Marc Stickdorn and service design • Video 3: Tom Kelley and unlocking creativity • Video 4: Frans Johansson on diversity and perseveration
  18. 18. Cases • Case 1: UK Life programme by Participle • Case 2: Improving A&E in a UK hospital • Case 3: dealing with low completion rates of postsecondary education in the US via nudging • Case 4: PLAN C in Flanders: seeking a transition from waste to materials management in sustainable development • Case 5: Living labs approach with example from Spain • Case 6: U-lab in Scotland • Case 7: reforming the Singapore Prison Service • Case 8: Stichting MAAT: systemic innovation in care • Case 9: IDRC: systemic innovation regarding equal opp’s for women
  19. 19. Tools • TOOL 1: descriptive part of a call for proposals on social innovation • TOOL 2: manual for project promotors to move from ideas to scaling • TOOL 3: Lego serious play • TOOL 4: creating and testing an experience map as a deliverable for phase 1 of an innovation project • TOOL 5: business model canvas • TOOL 6: guidance on how to organize challenge competitions / prizes • TOOL 7: project proposal form • TOOL 8: manual for completing the project proposal form • TOOL 9: appraisal form for project evaluators of phase 1 proposals • TOOL 10: appraisal form for project evaluators of a concept and phase 2 plan • TOOL 11: coaching questions to support promoters by ESIF [region or country] during PHASE 2 • TOOL 12: guidance concerning methods for impact evaluation of innovations • TOOL 13: innovation jam • TOOL 14: Social impact bond (SIB)
  20. 20. Chapters • 1 Social innovation and the EU – Inventory of EU publications • 2 The big picture: – Capability approach – Service innovation, incl. “nudging” – Transition theory – Theory U – A new synthesis for public administration
  21. 21. Chapters • 3 Innovation strategy for ESIF programmes (IVE, IVA, set a challenge or not,…) • 4 The innovation process at the level of a project • 5 Capacities required at the level of the project • 6 Implications for processes of ESIF funding organizations (appraising, M&E, coaching) • 7 Implications in terms of overall organization and staff requirements for an ESIF programme (what roles, with technical assistance or…) • 8 Implementation plan (how to get started)
  22. 22. Our aim for the rest of the event • Acquaint you with some key tools and guidance in the toolkit • Help you think about possible issues / choices to make • NOT an “how to” training
  23. 23. Europees Sociaal Fonds International seminar on supporting social innovation with the European Social Fund 26-27th October 2015 , Brussels, Hotel Bloom What kind of calls for proposals? Innovation via exploration versus innovation via adaptation? Setting the challenge or allowing it to be proposed? Workshop 1
  24. 24. Individualwell-beingand development? TOOL 1
  25. 25. What is the ultimate aim? • In phase 2, a new service is to be developed • by the end of phase 2 this has to be evaluated – The service needs to demonstrate that it supports the “well- being and development” of citizens in a better way – This in turn contributes to relevant policy objectives • well-being of an individual is defined as: – “engaging in activities and enjoying conditions that individuals have reason to value” – more generally this refers to being able to realize one’s potential and flourish • development is then understood as expanding people’s opportunities to engage in such a life as well as, through agency, being able to create such opportunities on one’s own initiative TOOL 1
  26. 26. IVE and…? • IVE focuses on challenges rather than concepts! • It is the innovation process that we put forward that provides at the end of phase 1 several inputs that allow us to decide whether to fund the more expensive phase 2 • But what if people already have a concept?
  27. 27. TOOL 1
  28. 28. It must be demonstrated this works better than existing solutions and that it is underutilised in our region / country! Just a “good idea” is hard to fund with public money In IVE, it is phase 1 that provides assurance, in IVA it is evidence for the innovative practice in a different context.
  29. 29. Discussion: 20 min • Innovation via exploration and innovation versus adaptation: – What do you think are strengths? – What weaknesses? – What questions do you have? – Write it on the flipcharts!
  30. 30. “In this call ESIF wants to give space to stand back from solutions already conceived. It is quite possible that one thinks one already has a good idea but in many cases it appears, if one can stand back a little, that much better solutions exist. This is why ESIF in this call in the first instance is looking for challenges, rather than solutions. Phase 1 of the project must serve to look for opportunities to innovate. Only at the end of phase 1 does ESIF expect concepts to address the challenge.” TOOL 8
  31. 31. Rather… • “The early dependence on others by the elderly faces society, in particular the immediate family and the elderly themselves, with a challenge. The average age that men become dependent is 75 years while their life expectancy is 81 years. For women this is respectively 77 and 83 years. The lack of physical activity is a major reason for this. At the same time the provisions for these dependent elderly lag behind because it was underestimated how much this group would grow. This problem is important because of the high human cost, namely the loss of quality of life in the elderly, including the loss of social contact, as well as for their immediate environment in which the elderly often play an important part in looking after grandchildren or dependent family members. But also the financial cost for society is very high. For example 80% of the costs for healthcare (118 billion EURO) are incurred in the last two years of life. Allowances for around 1 million dependent people cost around 4 billion per year.” TOOL 8
  32. 32. Rather not… • “We want to create an HR-toolbox to screen the development points among workers. There is still too little knowledge among many HR managers about how employees are best helped to identify their development points.” TOOL 8
  33. 33. Discussion: 15 min • What is for you the advantage / disadvantage in having a call that ASKS for a challenge rather than asks to RESPOND to a given challenge? • Write it down on the flipchart!
  34. 34. Europees Sociaal Fonds International seminar on supporting social innovation with the European Social Fund 26-27th October 2015 , Brussels, Hotel Bloom What kind of project proposal forms and appraisal criteria for exploration? Workshop 2
  35. 35. Proposal form (see hand-out) • What is the social challenge you want to address with your project? For which final target group (from the wider group of people in work and /or job-seekers) does this challenge apply? How big is this final target group? What are the relevant characteristics of this final target group? Does this challenge relate to a vulnerable group (because of their socio-economic situation, geographic location, language or culture, mental, physical handicap, …)? How is this final target group developing in the current situation with regard to the challenge (e.g. is the problem ever increasing, is the target group growing,…)? • How far has attention already been paid to this challenge in the past? • Why is this a challenge that must be addressed as a priority? Also argue for this on the basis of social costs and benefits. • Is there a longer term vision that leads you to formulate the challenge? If so, describe this. What has already happened in the past? What is in the pipeline? • Are there already other stakeholders who share this vision? Is there a wider dynamic involved regarding this vision? If so, describe this: who is already involved and how? • Draw up your schedule for phase 1 fieldwork, analysis, formulation of insights, generation of ideas and selection, concept formulation, concept test and pitch (which person from which organisation from the partnership carries out what action when and how and what is delivered)? How do you implement each step (method, tool, …)? • Which stakeholders not part of the project team (organisations and/or people, inside or outside of the partner organisations) would you involve when and how in the course of phase 1? • What is the mission and what are the key competences of the promoter and partners? How does this fit in with the challenge? • What is the experience of the project implementers from the promoter and partners with innovation in general (not only in ESIF)? If possible describe a few successful innovations on which the project implementers have worked and explain why you consider these successful or not. • In which relevant networks are project implementers active? Will you rely on them within this project? If so, how? TOOL 7
  36. 36. Appraisal criteria (see hand-out) • Quality and aspiration of the challenge: – To what extent is an important social challenge mentioned that is incorporated in a wider vision and dynamic? And which is relevant both for the final target group and the policy area? – 0=Not at all 1=Hardly 2=Reasonably 3=Considerably 4=Very considerably (Score of 0-4) (see CHALLENGE AND VISION) • Schedule: – To what extent is a clear approach set out in which crucial stakeholders are fully involved? And is this approach based mainly on taking different perspectives (incl. from the final target group) to the challenge? And do these different perspectives of the challenge arise from extensive fieldwork? (Score 0-4) (see PLAN) • Capacity: – To what extent do the promoter/ partners have a strong background and position both as regards innovation as well as the substance of the challenge? (Score 0-4) (see POSITION and TEAM) • Coherence of the whole – To what extent does the proposal as a whole form a coherent and convincing story? TOOL 9
  37. 37. Discussion • Take the example case • Decide which criterion you would like to apply and discuss • Use the case to discuss the criterion – Each criterion refers to the relevant proposal questions – For each criterion, extra guidance is provided the help argue for / against the proposal • What do you think is a strong / weak point ? • Write it down on the flip chart!
  38. 38. Europees Sociaal Fonds International seminar on supporting social innovation with the European Social Fund 26-27th October 2015 , Brussels, Hotel Bloom What could a “concept” for an innovative service look like? How to decide if it should be funded for development? Workshop 3
  39. 39. Phase 1 outputs • End of phase 1, we expect: –A concept description –An experience map –A high level business model –Results from the concept test with users and future service providers –A report on phase 1 –A plan for phase 2
  40. 40. Concept (see hand-out) Name Fill in here a name that shows which solution will be set up for which target group in what context Overarching challenge State what the fundamental need is on a social, emotional, intellectual, economic, physical, material… level for the final target group, on which the solution focuses. Specific question “How can we…?” Indicate here the more specific statement which was brainstormed. If work was done on behavioural theory insights, indicate here what type of behaviour change was aimed for (stopping, adjusting, refraining). Solution that offers an answer to the question Describe in a few sentences the solution that offers an answer to the specific question. Make it clear for whom in what context the solution is intended. This solution is further elaborated as an “experience map” (see below). How is impact on the overarching challenge achieved? Describe in what way this solution will address the fundamental need. What are the levers addressed in order to achieve the change, as discovered during the first phase? Describe to what extent and in what way the solution enables this impact to be achieved for the final target group more easily, with less effort, more quickly, more cheaply, more accessibly, more certainly, more pleasantly, less frustratingly, more predictably, with fewer concerns, with fewer errors, more functionally, more reliably, more acceptably, more fittingly, less riskily, more efficiently, … . If behavioural theory insights are used, state here what is addressed (Enthuse, Encourage, Engage, etc.). In addition, make clear to what extent the solution draws on the self-reliance of the wider community and to what extent it empowers the intended users (allow them to create more opportunities for themselves to realise the life they have reason to value). Measuring relevant impact in terms of well-being How will you measure whether the solution works for the users or not in terms of their well-being and development (where well-being of an individual is defined as engaging in activities and enjoying conditions that this individual has reason to value. More generally it refers to being able to realize one’s potential and flourish. Development is then understood as expanding people’s opportunities to engage in such a life)? Is this relevant for the policy area? Outside it? In how much time can this impact potentially be achieved for the final target group? What are the present alternatives for the solution? Who are the providers of this solution? What are their strengths / weaknesses? Describe what is at present used by the final target group to meet their needs, even if this is not intended directly for this need or is inappropriate. Make it clear who is involved in these solutions and what are their strengths and weaknesses compared with the new solution and the stakeholders who want to back them. Trends and wider framework (if relevant) Which trends does the solution address? In what wider framework? How is this specifically addressed? Future scaling up In what way could even more people be reached with this service provision? TOOL 2
  41. 41. Appraisal of concept (see hand-out) • Strategic importance / position of the concept – To what extent does the concept form an important component within a wider vision, carried by relevant stakeholders, to tackle the social challenge and to achieve a substantial impact in a reasonable time? • Advantage for the final target group: – To what extent does the concept supply a superior solution with respect to the present situation and the services which (may or may not) exist, for a well-defined target group? • Degree of innovation: – To what extent is the concept sufficiently different for the user and different from what may (or may not) already exist and be used in [region or country]? • Embedding: – To what extent is the concept fairly easy to launch after a successful evaluation, given the synergy with already existing activities and resources within the partnership? • Development: – To what extent is the concept fairly easy to develop, given the complexity of the concept and the familiarity/availability of the required knowledge and technology? • Finance: – To what extent is there sufficiently robust finance for the future solution once it would become operational after the ESF-funding stops? TOOL 10
  42. 42. Discussion • Decide which criterion you would like to discuss • Check what part of the concept enables to apply this criterion – Each criterion refers to the relevant output from phase 1 – For each criterion, extra guidance is provided the help argue for / against the proposal • What do you think is a strong / weak point ? – Of the concept description? – Of the criteria? • Write it down on the flip chart!
  43. 43. Europees Sociaal Fonds International seminar on supporting social innovation with the European Social Fund 26-27th October 2015 , Brussels, Hotel Bloom What roles could be taken up by whom (programme managers, beneficiaries, etc.) to support social innovation? Workshop 4
  44. 44. Roles in innovation processes • Activators: initiate process (put forward a need, a trigger); – lift others out of their routine and “provoke” them – key role for policy-makers – however, it is also possible that “activation” is taken up by a group of people e.g. stakeholders, the academic community, frontline workers… – Set scope (broad to more precise)
  45. 45. Roles in innovation processes • Browsers: search for information, throughout the process; – left entirely up to ESIF beneficiaries with no role for the ESIF authority… – …to ESIF authorities • providing access to information that is not available to single projects or only at a prohibitive cost, especially if narrow scope was set • helping developers to find execution partners if they are not able or willing to execute themselves
  46. 46. Roles in innovation processes • Creators: produce ideas (new concepts, possibilities, solutions) at any point of the process: – Should be owned by actors that would deliver the service – Can be supported in their process by ESIF auth. • Developers: turn ideas into products/services (invention); – Id.
  47. 47. Roles in innovation processes • Executors: bring innovation to the organisations that will use them and to the market (implementation); – Not ESIF itself – But ESIF can provide finance for sustaining an innovation while policy-makers adjust rules, policy, etc. to “mainstream” it • Facilitators: approve funding / deblock process (instrumentation) – Clearly task for ESIF authorities – But also activators can be involved in decision- making
  48. 48. I-team classification Role Creating solutions to solve specific challenges= intensive e.g. MINDLAB Engaging citizens, non-profits and businesses to find new ideas = medium e.g. Flemish Innovation Centres Transforming processes, skills and culture regarding innovation = light Achieving wider policy and systems change = deep and intensive e.g. transition platforms Activators: initiate process (put forward a need, a trigger) X Browsers: search for information, throughout the process X X X Creators: produce ideas (new concepts, possibilities, solutions) at any point of the process; X X X Developers: turn ideas into products/services (invention) X X Executors: bring innovation to the organisations that will use them and to the market (implementation) X Facilitators: approve funding / deblock process (instrumentation) X X X X See handout
  49. 49. I-team classification Role Creating solutions to solve specific challenges= intensive e.g. MINDLAB Engaging citizens, non-profits and businesses to find new ideas = medium e.g. Flemish Innovation Centres Transforming processes, skills and culture regarding innovation = light Achieving wider policy and systems change = e.g. transition platforms Activators: initiate process (put forward a need, a trigger) X Browsers: search for information, throughout the process X X X Creators: produce ideas (new concepts, possibilities, solutions) at any point of the process; X X X Developers: turn ideas into products/services (invention) X X Executors: bring innovation to the organisations that will use them and to the market (implementation) X Facilitators: approve funding / deblock process (instrumentation) X X X X Focus on service innovation Focus on system innovation
  50. 50. Beyond Technical Assistance? Light Intensive
  51. 51. What role for ESIF? • Do you think ESIF innovation support should consist of… – MINDLABS that do not just provide funding but are actively part of the service innovation process? – Innovation centres that help others create proposals for funding as well as give some advice on how to progress in the service innovation process? – Only providers of funding for service innovation? – A platform for longer term systemic innovation, which includes service innovations but also working on the system that may impede such services to take off? – Use the pre-prepared flipcharts

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