WiRe (Women in Research) November 2013

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WiRe (Women in Research) November 2013

  1. 1. WIRe Women in work, and diversity in Australia Erica van Lieven Managing Director November 2013 1
  2. 2. Diversity is an important issue for economic success in Australia The recent Business Council of Australia report acknowledges that despite the two waves of change we have already had (legislation for equality in 1999 and specific training by employers), there is a growing acknowledgement that organisations are inherently gendered. Gender diversity is about having and valuing diversity in teams, styles and thinking, different perceptions of problems and different viewpoints. Diversity is not comfortable, but offers superior organisational effectiveness The diversity issue cuts both ways in Australia; young males do less well in school, particularly in literacy and subsequently tertiary education; then we lose the training we have invested in women in their late 20s to mid 30s as they fail to progress to leadership roles in organisations. Women in work, and diversity in Australia 2
  3. 3. Education: Australian girls are ahead of boys on Literacy 15 year old girls out perform boys on reading literacy in Australia. At age 15, girls outperform boys in reading in every PISA participating country and economy. The reading performance gender gap is equivalent, across OECD countries, to one years worth of schooling. In mathematics, boys outperform girls in some countries and economies but differences are generally smaller. In science, gender differences are small and there is no consistent pattern across countries. OECD REPORT 2012 Maths Science and Reading scores on PISA, 15 Years old Source: OECD 2004 Learning for Tomorrow’s World – First results from PISA 2003 Women in work, and diversity in Australia 3
  4. 4. On average year 12 males are less likely to complete yr 12 than female students Since 1984, female students have been more likely to continue through to Year 12 than male students. In a pattern reflecting almost all OECD countries, while many boys perform well, on average boys achieve less than girls. Boys are less likely than girls to complete high school, and are less likely to go to university. In 2010, this had increased to 73% of young men and 83% of young women who completed high school in Australia. Source: ABS 2001 Transition from Education to Work Survey; 2002-2010 Surveys of Education and Work Women in work, and diversity in Australia 4
  5. 5. From a slow start women in Australia have increased their participation in tertiary education Women in work, and diversity in Australia 5
  6. 6. Women out number men in enrolments for bachelor degrees Women outnumber men graduating from bachelor degrees and advanced diplomas. In 1987 more men than women were students of higher education. In 2011 however, 57% of enrolments were women. 42% of women are enrolled in a bachelor degree versus 37% of men. Similar proportions of men and women are enrolled in postgraduate degrees. Participation trends in higher education in Australia reveal a reversal in the gender gap. Source: ABS 2011 Survey of Education and Work Women in work, and diversity in Australia 6
  7. 7. Yet median starting salaries for women are consistently lower than males… The transition from education to paid work is a crucial moment which lays the foundation for many of the inequalities encountered in the labour market throughout women’s working lives. In 2012 the starting salary for recent female bachelor degree graduates was 90% of a male graduates salary…$50,000 compared with $55,000. The salary disparity between men and women for post graduate work is more pronounced than that of bachelor degree candidates: 2010 median full time salary for females masters by course work graduates was $70,000 compared with $85,000 for male graduates, despite similar numbers of enrolments. Source: ABS Gender Indicators Australia, Australian Social Trends July 2012 Women in work, and diversity in Australia 7
  8. 8. In 13 fields of education mens starting salaries were greater than womens Fields of education where men earned more than women in 2012 and 2011 2012 Industry Architecture and building Dentistry Optometry Law Economics, business Art and design Accounting Mathematics Veterinary science Paramedical studies Social work Psychology Agricultural science Male ($, 000) 52 92 82 55 50 42.5 50 58.1 46 53 50.9 49.5 50.5 Female ($, 000) 43 77.6 75 50.7 47 40 48 56 45 52 50 49 50 2011 Male ($, 000) 50 80 72 52 50 42 48 55 43 52 49 50 45 Female ($, 000) 43 75 70 50 45 40 46 55 45 50 50 47 46 Source: Workplace Gender Equality Agency | GradStats – starting salaries | www.wgea.gov.au Women in work, and diversity in Australia 8
  9. 9. We are wasting the investment in education Australia has one of the most highly educated female populations in the world, but we rank behind countries like Finland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Israel, Canada, France, USA and Germany in the gap in labour force participation across ages 15-64 years. Source: Gender Equality in Education, Employment and Entrepreneurship: OECD, May 2012 Women in work, and diversity in Australia 9
  10. 10. Representation of women in senior executive positions in ASX 200 companies has not exceeded 13% for the past decade 38.5% of ASX 200 companies and 56.2% of ASX 500 companies do not have a female director The industry sectors with the highest percentage of female directors across both ASX 200 AND 500 are insurance and banking “A wide gap remains between intention and outcome, there has been no improvement in the perceptions of a level playing field for women. In fact there has been a decline, with only 15% of women believing they have equal opportunity for promotion to senior management positions.” Bain & Co report EMT: executive management team, the most senior person in the organisation ( CEO,MD) and those that report directly to that person. Executive Key Management personnel (executive KMP) defined in the Australia accounting standard as the person with authority, responsible for planning, directing & controlling activities of entity directly or indirectly Source: Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency ; 2012 Australian Census of Women in Leadership Women in work, and diversity in Australia 10
  11. 11. what stops women from reaching the top? Source: What stops women from reaching the top? Confronting the tough issues, BAIN & Co 2011 Women and men acknowledge they have different styles, but men don’t see the impact on women's opportunities for advancement. There are no gender differences in attributes for making commercially sound decisions, managing high pressure situations or delivering significant transformative change. However men and women agree they achieve these outcomes with significantly different styles: women collaborate more whereas men promote their points of view more effectively. 1. Perception about challenges associated with competing work-life priorities and that women's style is different from men, and less valued 2. Women and men both recognize that they have different styles, but men don’t recognize the obstacle this presents for women’s promotability 3. The underlying view of women's style affects perceptions of their ability to lead Women in work, and diversity in Australia 11
  12. 12. “ When all the details fit in perfectly, something is probably wrong with the story. Women in work, and diversity in Australia 12
  13. 13. Warren Buffet is bullish on women “ We’ve seen what can be accomplished when we use 50 per cent of our human capacity. If you visualise what 100 per cent can do, you’ll join me as an unbridled optimist. Warren Buffet , Fortune Magazine May 20, 2013 “ Women should never forget that it is common for powerful and seemingly self-assured males to have more than a bit of the Wizard of Oz in them. Pull the curtain aside, and you'll often discover they are not supermen after all. (Just ask their wives!) Fortune Magazine May 20, 2013 Women in work, and diversity in Australia 13
  14. 14. References Australian Bureau of Statistics 2013, Australian Social Trends, cat. no. 4102. 0, ABS, Canberra. Australian Bureau of Statistics 2012, Australian Social Trends, cat. no. 4102. 0, ABS, Canberra. Australian Bureau of Statistics 2012, GenderIndicators, cat. no. 4125.0, ABS, Canberra Australian Bureau of Statistics 2011, Australian Social Trends, cat. no. 4102. 0, ABS, Canberra. Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006, Australian Social Trends, cat. no. 4102. 0, ABS, Canberra. Australian Government & Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency 2012, Australian Census of Women in Leadership, Australian Government & Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Agency, Canberra. Toohey, T Colosimo, D Boak, A 2009, Economics:Australia's Hidden Resource: The Economic Case For Increasing Female Participation', Goldman Sachs JBWere Investment Research, Australia. OECD 2012, 'Gender Equality in Education, Employment and Entrepreneurship: Final Report to the MCM 2012', OECD, Paris. Sanders, M Hrdlicka, J Hellicar, M Cottrell, D Knox, J 2011 'What stops women from reaching the top? Confronting the tough issue', Bain & Company, Sydney. Sandberg, S 2013, 'Lean in: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead', Alfred A.Knope, New York. Fortune Magazine, May 2013 Warren Buffett is bullish ... on women; Increasing the number of Women in Senior Executive Positions, Business Council of Australia Report BY Meredith Hellicar Nov 2013 Graduate Careers Australia (2012), Postgraduate Destinations Report 2011, http://www.graduatecareers.com.au/Research/Resear chReports/PostgraduateDestinations 14
  15. 15. Thank You Lets Connect! Erica van Lieven Managing Director November 2013 www.directionfirst.com Linked in: au.linkedin.com/in/ericavanlieven/ Twitter: @erica_dfirst Email: erica.vanlieven@directionfirst.com 15

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