Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Tank	
  Basics	
  
API	
  650	
  Fabrica3on	
  
www.epcmconsultants.co.za
Tank	
  Basics	
  -­‐	
  API	
  650	
  Fabrica3on	
  
	
  
The	
  Uniqueness	
  of	
  Tanks	
  ~	
  Different	
  Components...
API	
  650	
  -­‐	
  Organiza3on	
  
API	
  650	
  is	
  primarily	
  organized	
  by	
  fabrica>on	
  sequence.	
  
	
  
...
Material	
  Selec3on	
  
API	
  650	
  allows	
  specific	
  materials	
  4.2.1.1	
  
Some>mes	
  need	
  materials	
  with...
Bo>om	
  –	
  Major	
  Concepts	
  
Why	
  is	
  the	
  tank	
  bo3om	
  generally	
  thinner	
  than	
  the	
  bo3om	
  s...
Bo>om	
  –	
  Design	
  Issues	
  
•  Min.	
  New	
  Thickness	
  -­‐6	
  mm	
  (0.236")	
  5.4.1	
  
•  Minimum	
  Annula...
Shell	
  –	
  Major	
  Concepts	
  
•  Shell	
  is	
  designed	
  for	
  the	
  "sta>c	
  head"	
  pressure	
  from	
  the...
Shell	
  -­‐	
  Design	
  
•  The	
  wall	
  thickness	
  for	
  each	
  course	
  must	
  be	
  calculated	
  Lower	
  co...
Shell	
  -­‐	
  Thickness	
  
•  1-­‐Foot	
  Method	
  -­‐	
  used	
  for	
  tanks	
  <	
  200	
  feet	
  5.6.3.1	
  
•  V...
Shell	
  –	
  Minimum	
  Thickness	
  
API	
  650	
  Formula	
  
•  Td=	
  [2.6	
  D	
  (	
  H-­‐1)]/Sd	
  	
  G	
  +	
  C...
Shell	
  –	
  NewThickness	
  
New	
  Thickness	
  -­‐	
  Pick	
  largest	
  of	
  the	
  following:	
  
1.	
  Calc	
  -­‐...
Shell	
  -­‐	
  Fabrica3on	
  
•  Cu[ng	
  &	
  Rolling	
  Plates	
  6.1.2/3	
  
•  Preheat	
  Temperatures	
  Table	
  7-...
Shell	
  -­‐	
  RT	
  
RT-­‐	
  Primary	
  NDE	
  method	
  for	
  shell	
  welds	
  
Number	
  of	
  Radiographs	
  8.1.2...
NDE	
  General	
  
NDE	
  Technician	
  Qualifica>on	
  
•  RT&	
  UT-­‐ASNT	
  (SNT-­‐TC-­‐IA)	
  8.1.3.2/8.3.2.4	
  &	
  ...
Shell	
  –	
  Inspec3on	
  &	
  Test	
  
•  Other	
  Weld	
  InspecGon	
  
	
  No	
  cracks,	
  arc	
  strikes	
  8.5.1.a	...
Tank	
  Roof	
  
•  Primary	
  funcGon	
  -­‐	
  Keep	
  product	
  in	
  and	
  keep	
  the	
  atmosphere	
  out	
  
•  T...
Floa3ng	
  Roof	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Design	
  InformaGon	
  for	
  FloaGng	
  Roofs	
  
•  Appendix	
  C	
  -­‐	
...
Tank	
  Seals	
  
Primary	
  Seal	
  	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  Secondary	
  Seal	
  
Normally	
  a	
  Mechanical	
   	
...
Tank	
  Roof	
  
•  Design	
  
Lap	
  welded	
  single	
  full	
  fillet	
  on	
  top	
  5.1.5.9	
  
Plate	
  thickness	
  ...
Shell-­‐to-­‐Bo>om	
  Weld	
  
•  This	
  weld	
  and	
  surrounding	
  area	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  highest	
  stres...
Roof-­‐to-­‐Shell	
  Weld	
  
•  On	
  most	
  Cone	
  Roofs	
  this	
  joint	
  is	
  designed	
  to	
  fail	
  It's	
  c...
Other	
  
•  Welding	
  9.2/3/4	
  
	
  Procedures	
  &	
  Welders	
  Qualified	
  ASME	
  Sect	
  IX	
  
	
  Weld	
  ID	
 ...
Tank	
  Inspec3on	
  
API	
  653Sec3on	
  1	
  Thru	
  6	
  &	
  App	
  B	
  
Module	
  Objec3ves	
  
Let’s	
  Inspect	
  &	
  Evaluate	
  
At	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  this	
  module	
  you	
  should	
 ...
API	
  653	
  -­‐	
  Scope	
  
"What	
  is	
  the	
  purpose	
  of	
  API	
  653?“	
  
•  To	
  decide	
  Tank	
  Inspec>o...
Tank	
  Roof	
  Evalua3on	
  
Verify	
  structural	
  integrity	
  of	
  roof	
  
Minimum	
  roof	
  thickness	
  
•  Aver...
Tank	
  Shell	
  Evalua3on	
  
•  How	
  Corrosion	
  Types	
  are	
  Evaluated	
  v	
  Uniform	
  Corrosion	
  
•  Use	
 ...
Uniform	
  Corrosion	
  
The	
  tmin	
  for	
  a	
  Shell	
  Course	
  is:	
  
	
   	
   	
   	
   	
   	
  	
  
	
   	
  ...
Minimum	
  Shell	
  Calc	
  Notes	
  
1.	
  tmin	
  (minimum	
  thickness)	
  -­‐	
  Based	
  on	
  calc,	
  but	
  can	
 ...
So	
  here’s	
  the	
  work	
  process:	
  During	
  tank	
  design,	
  the	
  designer	
  
	
  calculates	
  tmin	
  usin...
Joint	
  Efficiency	
  –	
  “E”	
  
•  Joint	
  Efficiency	
  is	
  a	
  safety	
  factor	
  based	
  on	
  the	
  joint	
  ty...
Joint	
  Efficiency	
  –	
  “E”	
  
Shell	
  Corrosion	
  Averaging	
  
The	
  tmin	
  for	
  a	
  corroded	
  area	
  is:	
  
	
  
4.3.3	
  .	
  1.b	
  
	
  ...
Shell	
  Corrosion	
  Averaging	
  
Minimum	
  Shell	
  Calc	
  Notes!	
  
	
  
1.	
   	
  tmin	
  (minimum	
  thickness)	...
Shell	
  Corrosion	
  Averaging	
  
1. 	
  	
  Find	
  "t2"	
  -­‐	
  minimum	
  thickness	
  in	
  corroded	
  area	
  
2...
Cri3cal	
  Length	
  Notes	
  
1.  "L	
  "	
  is	
  always	
  3.7	
  (Dt2	
  )	
  1/2.	
  There	
  is	
  no	
  limit	
  to...
Liquid	
  Height	
  Calcs	
  -­‐	
  LTA	
  
•  Product	
  Fill	
  Height	
  -­‐	
  LTA	
  
H	
  =	
  Set/2.6	
  DG	
  
	
 ...
Shell	
  -­‐	
  Pilng	
  
1.	
  Length	
  Evalua>on	
  
a.	
  In	
  8"	
  verGcal	
  line,	
  sum	
  length	
  of	
  Pits	...
Other	
  Deteriora3on	
  
•  Shell	
  distorGons	
  -­‐	
  Evaluate	
  Other	
  Flaws	
  
•  Cracks	
  -­‐	
  thoroughly	
...
Tank	
  Bo>om	
  Evalua3on	
  
Bo3om	
  Leaks	
  –	
  The	
  tank	
  failures	
  are	
  a3ributed	
  to	
  
Top-­‐side	
  ...
Inspec3ng	
  Tank	
  Bo>oms	
  
Special	
  tools	
  have	
  been	
  developed	
  for	
  inspec>ng	
  tank	
  boAoms.	
  Co...
Tank	
  Bo>om	
  Calcula3on	
  
Future	
  Thickness	
  (MRT)	
  
	
  
MRT	
  =	
  RT	
  –	
  Or	
  (StPr	
  +	
  UPr)	
  
...
Table	
  4.4:	
  Bo>om	
  Plate	
  
Minimum	
  Thickness	
  
Min.	
  Bo3om	
  Thickness	
   Tank	
  Bo3om	
  and	
  
Found...
Bo>om	
  Evalua3on	
  Notes	
  
1.	
  Current	
  Remaining	
  Thickness	
  (RT)	
  -­‐	
  The	
  lowest	
  boAom	
  thickn...
Tank	
  Bo>om	
  Evalua3on	
  
The	
  CriGcal	
  Zone	
  -­‐	
  Within	
  3"	
  of	
  shell	
  
•  This	
  is	
  a	
  high...
Annular	
  Plates	
  
*	
  Minimum	
  Thickness	
  
•  Specific	
  Gravity	
  <1.0	
  
	
  API	
  653	
  Table	
  4-­‐5	
  ...
Tank	
  Founda3on	
  
•  Calcining	
  (loss	
  of	
  water	
  of	
  hydra>on)	
  
	
  Exposed	
  to	
  high	
  temperature...
Bri>leness	
  and	
  Toughness	
  
•  Bri3leness:	
  "Separa>on	
  of	
  a	
  solid	
  accompanied	
  by	
  liAle	
  or	
 ...
Material	
  Selec3on	
  
•  For	
  new	
  materials	
  used	
  during	
  repairs	
  &	
  alteraGon	
  
•  API	
  653	
  "m...
What	
  Affects	
  Toughness?	
  
1.	
  Material	
  Type	
  -­‐	
  Some	
  materials	
  have	
  higher	
  toughness.	
  
	
...
Past	
  Bri>le	
  Failures	
  
•  All	
  reported	
  bri3le	
  fracture	
  failures	
  have	
  occurred	
  at	
  either:	
...
Bri>le	
  Fracture	
  Evalua3on	
  
•  Evaluate	
  bri3le	
  fracture	
  potenGal	
  when	
  changing	
  service	
  to:	
 ...
Bri>les	
  Fracture	
  Evalua3on	
  
Internal	
  Alterna3ves	
  
Robo>cs	
  -­‐	
  If	
  only	
  boAom	
  thickness	
  measurements	
  are	
  needed	
  (6.4.1....
Scheduled	
  Inspec3ons	
  
Inspec:on	
  
type	
  
Inspec:on	
  Interval	
   Inspector	
  
Qualifica:on	
  
Key	
  Factor	
...
Se>lement	
  Surveys	
  
•  SeAlement	
  surveys	
  should	
  periodically	
  be	
  done	
  
	
  The	
  interval	
  is	
  ...
 
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Excessive	
  seAlement	
  increases	
  the	
  stress	
  in	
  the	
  boAom-...
Types	
  of	
  Se>lement	
  
Uniform	
  -­‐	
  BoAom	
  stays	
  flat	
  
	
  Minor	
  problems	
  
	
  Pipe	
  alignment	
...
Acceptance	
  Criteria	
  
•  Out-­‐of-­‐Plane	
  Se3lement	
  
–  Use	
  Cosine	
  Curve	
  to	
  determine	
  deflec>on	
...
Acceptance	
  Criteria	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Example:	
  EvaluaGng	
  a	
  Bo3om	
  Depression	
  
Depression	...
Edge	
  Se>lement	
  
•  Edge	
  Se3lement	
  EvaluaGon	
  
	
  Fig.	
  B.I	
  1	
  SeAlement	
  is	
  parallel	
  to	
  b...
Edge	
  Se>lement	
  Evalua3on	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Note!	
  Many	
  tank	
  floors	
  are	
  
	
  installed	
  wit...
Se>lement	
  Example	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Note!	
  What	
  if	
  the	
  seAlement	
  is	
  som...
Repairs,	
  Altera>ons	
  &	
  
Reconstruc>on	
  
API	
  653	
  -­‐	
  Sec>ons	
  7	
  thru	
  13	
  API	
  653	
  
Cer>fic...
Mobile	
  Objec3ves	
  
In	
  this	
  module	
  you	
  will	
  learn	
  specific	
  requirements	
  for	
  Repairs,	
  Alte...
Reconstruc3on	
  Materials	
  
•  Structural	
  
	
  Reused	
  -­‐	
  ASTMA	
  7	
  as	
  a	
  minimum	
  
	
  New	
  -­‐	...
Which	
  Code?	
  
•  As-­‐built	
  (original	
  construc>on)	
  Standard	
  
	
  Exis>ng	
  Welds	
  
	
  Exis>ng	
  Pene...
Shell	
  Design	
  
•  Shell	
  Welds	
  
	
  BuA	
  Welds	
  with	
  complete	
  Penetra>on/Fusion	
  
•  Allowable	
  St...
Shell	
  Replacement	
  Plates	
  
•  Plate	
  Thickness	
  
–  ≥to	
  tnominal	
  of	
  thicker	
  neighbor	
  
	
  
•  V...
Shell	
  Replacement	
  Plates	
  
•  Plate	
  Size	
  Fig.	
  9-­‐1	
  
–  Based	
  on	
  plate	
  thickness	
  
–  Minim...
Shell	
  Lap	
  Patches	
  
•  Three	
  applicaGons	
  
	
  
1.	
  Cover	
  up	
  holes	
  (9.3.2)	
  
	
  Weld	
  inside	...
Shell	
  Repairs	
  Op3ons	
  
•  Grind	
  out	
  9.4	
  
–  O|en	
  done	
  for	
  crack	
  
–  Adequate	
  remaining	
  ...
Shell	
  Repairs	
  Op3ons	
  
Exis3ng	
  Weld	
  Defects	
  
•  Cracks,	
  Lack	
  of	
  Fusion,	
  Rejectable	
  Slag	
  
	
  Evaluate	
  if	
  it	
  n...
Penetra3ons	
  
•  Adding	
  Reinforcement	
  Plates	
  to	
  exis>ng	
  
	
  API	
  650	
  
	
  API	
  653	
  Fig.	
  9.3...
Nozzle	
  Spacing	
  
•  If	
  replacement	
  bo3om	
  causes	
  nozzles	
  to	
  be	
  too	
  close	
  to	
  bo3om	
  
• ...
Bo>om	
  Repairs	
  –	
  Cri3cal	
  Zone	
  
•  The	
  "Cri>cal	
  Zone"	
  
	
  High	
  stressed	
  boAom	
  area	
  
•  ...
Bo>om	
  Repairs	
  –	
  Cri3cal	
  Zone	
  
Defini>on:	
  
Cri>cal	
  Zone:	
  Por>on	
  of	
  tank	
  boAom	
  within	
  ...
Bo>om	
  Repairs	
  –	
  Non	
  Cri3cal	
  Zone	
  
•  Weld	
  overlay	
  
	
  Size	
  not	
  limited	
  
	
  Remove	
  su...
Roofs	
  
•  Fixed	
  Roofs	
  
	
  Replacement	
  plates:	
  3/16"+	
  CA	
  
	
  Supports:	
  Don't	
  exceed	
  API	
  ...
Hot	
  Taps	
  
•  Nozzle	
  size-­‐to-­‐shell	
  thickness	
  limita>ons	
  Table	
  9-­‐1	
  
•  New	
  Nozzle	
  Loca>o...
Hot	
  Taps	
  –	
  Nozzle	
  Spacing	
  
This	
  table	
  applies	
  if	
  any	
  of	
  the	
  following	
  apply:	
  
1....
Tank	
  Dismantling	
  
•  Cu[ng	
  the	
  Tank	
  
–  Any	
  Size	
  Pieces	
  
•  Shell	
  Cu[ng	
  Op>ons	
  
–  Shells...
Tank	
  Dismantling	
  
Shell	
  to	
  BoAom	
  Weld	
  Op>ons	
  
1.	
  Cut	
  at	
  "A-­‐A	
  "	
  &	
  "B-­‐B	
  "	
  i...
Reconstruc3on	
  -­‐	
  Welding	
  
•  Weld	
  Spacing	
  
	
  Don't	
  align	
  shell	
  ver>cal	
  welds	
  with	
  boAo...
Reconstruc3on	
  -­‐	
  Welding	
  
•  Thickness	
  Limits	
  
	
  If,	
  t>l",	
  then	
  warm	
  base	
  to	
  140	
  °F...
Reconstruc3on	
  -­‐	
  Welding	
  
•  Tack	
  Welds	
  
	
  Remove	
  all	
  ver>cal	
  tacks	
  if	
  joint	
  weld	
  i...
Welding	
  Misc.	
  
•  ASMESectlX	
  
	
  WPS	
  qualifica>on	
  
	
  Welders	
  qualifica>on	
  
•  Weldability	
  of	
  s...
NDE	
  General	
  
•  Procedures:	
  ASME	
  SecGon	
  V	
  
•  Acceptance	
  Criteria:	
  ASME	
  SecGon	
  Via	
  
•  Pe...
MT	
  &	
  PT	
  Methods	
  
•  Cavi>es	
  from	
  grinding	
  and	
  gouging	
  
	
  Nozzle	
  fillet	
  welds;	
  
	
  no...
Tank	
  Bo>oms	
  
•  New	
  Shell-­‐to-­‐Bo3om	
  Welds	
  
	
  1st	
  weld	
  pass	
  -­‐	
  light	
  diesel	
  oil	
  (...
NDE	
  -­‐	
  Radiography	
  
•  Follow	
  API	
  650	
  PLUS:	
  
New	
  plate-­‐to-­‐new	
  plate:	
  no	
  addiGon	
  r...
1.	
  Minimum	
  diagnos>c	
  length	
  ofRT:	
  6"	
  
2.	
  Exis>ng	
  welds	
  evaluated	
  per	
  construc>on	
  std.	...
Hydrosta3c	
  Tes3ng	
  
•  A	
  hydrotest	
  is	
  required	
  for	
  all:	
  
	
  Reconstructed	
  Tanks	
  (never	
  ex...
Defini>on	
  Major	
  Repair	
  &	
  AlteraGon:	
  Not	
  clearly	
  defined,	
  but	
  includes	
  all	
  the	
  
	
  follo...
Hydrosta3c	
  Tes3ng	
  
•  Perform	
  Se3lement	
  Survey	
  
	
  Before,	
  during,	
  and	
  a|er	
  filling	
  
	
  Acc...
Marking	
  &	
  Recordkeeping	
  
•  Major	
  Types	
  of	
  Records	
  (6.8)	
  
	
  Construc>on	
  Records	
  
	
  Inspe...
Reconstruc3on	
  Records	
  
•  AddiGonal	
  Nameplate	
  
	
  AAach	
  next	
  to	
  exis>ng	
  
	
  5/32"	
  leAers	
  (...
Cathodic	
  ProtecGon	
  &	
  Linings	
  
API	
  651	
  -­‐	
  CPfor	
  Tanks	
  API	
  652	
  -­‐	
  
Linings	
  for	
  T...
CP	
  Objec3ves	
  
•  At	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  this	
  module	
  you	
  should:	
  Know	
  how	
  a	
  corrosion	
  cell...
Corrosion	
  Cell	
  
•  Component	
  of	
  a	
  Corrosion	
  Cell	
  
	
  Anode	
  
	
  Cathode	
  
	
  Metallic	
  path	...
Corrosion	
  Cell	
  is	
  an	
  Electrical	
  Circuit	
  
Corrosion	
  Cell	
  
•  Dissimilar	
  materials	
  -­‐	
  See	
  Galvanic	
  Series	
  Differences	
  between:	
  weld,	
 ...
Cathodic	
  Protec3on	
  (CP)	
  
•  CP	
  provides	
  an	
  anode	
  thus	
  protecGng	
  the	
  anode	
  -­‐	
  the	
  t...
Galvanic	
  CP	
  
Anodes	
  are	
  placed	
  around	
  or	
  under	
  tank	
  
Anodes	
  are	
  usually	
  magnesium	
  o...
Impressed	
  Current	
  CP	
  
•  Electrical	
  current	
  supplied	
  from	
  A.C.	
  source	
  
•  Rec>fier	
  changes	
 ...
Opera3onal	
  Issues	
  
•  Stray	
  currents	
  
•  Desired	
  current	
  density	
  is	
  1-­‐2	
  milliamps/|2	
  
•  D...
Inspec3on	
  Issues	
  
•  Impressed	
  Current	
  System	
  -­‐	
  Quick	
  Check	
  
	
  Every	
  2	
  months	
  
	
  Sy...
Linings	
  Objec3ves	
  
At	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  this	
  module	
  you	
  should:	
  
•  Know	
  the	
  types	
  of	
  L...
Corrosion	
  Mechanics	
  
•  Chemical	
  corrosion	
  
•  Concentra>on	
  cell	
  corrosion	
  
	
  Occurs	
  when	
  a	
...
Thin-­‐Film	
  Lining	
  
•  20	
  mils	
  or	
  less	
  in	
  thickness	
  
•  Apply	
  2-­‐3	
  coats	
  for	
  thin-­‐fi...
Thick-­‐Film	
  Lining	
  
•  Greater	
  than	
  20	
  mils	
  in	
  thickness	
  v	
  Apply	
  1-­‐4	
  coats	
  for	
  t...
Lining	
  Installa3on	
  
•  Surface	
  prepara>on	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  cri>cal	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  lining	
  opera...
Lining	
  Installa3on	
  
•  Surface	
  roughness	
  required	
  is	
  1.5-­‐4	
  mils	
  
•  and	
  increases	
  with	
  ...
Inspec3on	
  
•  All	
  inspectors	
  should	
  be	
  NACE	
  cer>fied	
  or	
  persons	
  who	
  have	
  demonstrated	
  
...
ASME	
  B	
  &	
  PV	
  Sec3on	
  V	
  
Module	
  Objec3ves	
  
•  At	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  this	
  module	
  you	
  should	
  know:	
  
•  The	
  purpose	
  of	...
The	
  Codes	
  Purpose	
  
•  Sec>on	
  V	
  sets	
  requirements	
  to	
  assure	
  that	
  a	
  
	
  "quality"	
  NDE	
...
Organiza3on	
  of	
  Code	
  
•  Two	
  major	
  Subsec>ons	
  
	
  SubsecGon	
  A:	
  Provides	
  guidance	
  for	
  each...
Ar3cle	
  2	
  -­‐	
  Radiography	
  
Our	
  focus	
  will	
  primarily	
  be	
  on	
  Radiography.	
  There	
  a	
  numbe...
Radiography	
  RT	
  
•  Principles	
  of	
  RadiaGon	
  
	
  Radia>on	
  penetrates	
  maAer	
  
	
  Radia>on	
  that	
  ...
How	
  Radiography	
  Works	
  
1.	
  The	
  film	
  becomes	
  exposed	
  when	
  RTrays	
  (gamma	
  rays)	
  strike	
  t...
RT	
  Setup	
  Technique	
  
•  Single-­‐wall	
  Technique	
  
	
  Radia3on	
  only	
  passes	
  through	
  1	
  wall	
  (...
RT	
  Setup	
  Teqncique	
  
•  DWTech	
  -­‐	
  Single	
  Wall	
  Viewing	
  
Source	
  is	
  placed	
  on	
  one	
  side...
Penetrameters	
  -­‐	
  IQIs	
  
•  The	
  funcGon	
  of	
  the	
  Penetrameter	
  
	
  It's	
  how	
  the	
  sensi>vity	
...
IQIs	
  Size	
  &	
  Number	
  
•  Penetrameter	
  Size	
  
	
  Use	
  Table	
  T-­‐276	
  to	
  select	
  IQI	
  
	
  Wat...
Back	
  Sca>er	
  
•  Backsca3er	
  definiGon	
  
	
  Radia>on	
  bounces	
  off	
  an	
  obstruc>on	
  and	
  strikes	
  th...
RT	
  Markings	
  
•  RT	
  IdenGficaGon	
  -­‐	
  Each	
  RT	
  marked:	
  (T-­‐224)	
  
	
  Contract	
  
	
  Weld	
  Numb...
Film	
  Evalua3on	
  
•  Previously	
  we	
  have	
  focused	
  on	
  performing	
  the	
  RT	
  examinaGon,	
  now	
  it'...
Evalua3on	
  Film	
  Density	
  
Film	
  Density	
  is	
  the	
  darkness	
  of	
  the	
  film,	
  Density	
  is	
  measure...
Evalua3on	
  IQI	
  
•  Check	
  IQI	
  Placement	
  
	
  Hole-­‐type	
  IQI	
  -­‐	
  adjacent	
  to	
  weld	
  or	
  acr...
Evalua3on	
  of	
  Backsca>er	
  
•  Backsca3er	
  definiGon	
  
	
  Radia>on	
  bounces	
  off	
  of	
  obstruc>ons	
  and	...
Evalua3on	
  Geometric	
  Unsharpness	
  
•  Geometric	
  Unsharpness	
  is	
  the	
  shadow	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  seen	...
Other	
  NDE	
  Methods	
  
•  The	
  other	
  NDE	
  Ar>cles	
  are	
  organized	
  similarly	
  to	
  RT.	
  
	
  Equipm...
Quality	
  Welds	
  
ASME	
  B	
  &	
  PV	
  Sec3on	
  IX	
  
Module	
  Objec3ves	
  
•  At	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  this	
  module	
  you	
  should	
  know:	
  
	
  The	
  purpose	
  of...
Sec3on	
  IX	
  Qualifica3on	
  
During	
  qualifica>on	
  tes>ng	
  (either	
  welder	
  or	
  procedure),	
  a	
  test	
  ...
Test	
  Posis3ons	
  
Test	
  PosiGons	
  are	
  used	
  during	
  the	
  Welder's	
  Qualifica>on	
  tes>ng.	
  The	
  tes...
Tank Basics API 650 Fabrication
Tank Basics API 650 Fabrication
Tank Basics API 650 Fabrication
Tank Basics API 650 Fabrication
Tank Basics API 650 Fabrication
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Tank Basics API 650 Fabrication

8,972 views

Published on

Tank Basics API 650 Fabrication

Published in: Engineering

Tank Basics API 650 Fabrication

  1. 1. Tank  Basics   API  650  Fabrica3on   www.epcmconsultants.co.za
  2. 2. Tank  Basics  -­‐  API  650  Fabrica3on     The  Uniqueness  of  Tanks  ~  Different  Components  with  specific  requirements     1)  Five  Major  Components   a.  Founda>on   b.  BoAom   c.  Shell   d.  Roof   e.  Nozzle   2)  Two  Major  Welds   a.  BoAom-­‐to-­‐Shell   b.  Shell-­‐to-­‐Roof   Each  component  has  specific  requirements  for;  Design,  Erec>on,  Inspec>on,   and  Tes>ng  
  3. 3. API  650  -­‐  Organiza3on   API  650  is  primarily  organized  by  fabrica>on  sequence.     Sec>on  1  -­‐  Scope  (What's  covered  by  this  Code)   Sec>on  4  -­‐  Materials  (What's  allowed,  restric>ons)   Sec>on  5  -­‐  Design  (Thickness,  joint  designs)   Sec>on  6  -­‐  Fabrica>on  (Cu[ng  and  Rolling  Plate)   Sec>on  7-­‐Erec>on  (Field  Assembly  of  Components)   Sec>on  8  -­‐  Inspec>on  (Qualifica>ons,  Acceptance  Standards)   Sec>on  9  -­‐  Welding  (Qualifica>ons,  Markings)   Sec>on  10  -­‐  Markings  (Nameplates,  Cer>fica>on)  
  4. 4. Material  Selec3on   API  650  allows  specific  materials  4.2.1.1   Some>mes  need  materials  with  appropriate  "toughness“   How  to  find  whether  Impact  test  are  required   •  Find  Material  Group  for  Plate  Table  4-­‐4b   •  Determine  Minimum  Design  Metal  Temperature  Fig.  4-­‐1b   •  Determine  Lowest  One  Day  Temp  Figure  4-­‐2   •  Add  15  °F  to  this  Low  Temp   •  If  this  temperature  is  above  the  Minimum  Design  Metal  Temperature  -­‐   Build  the  tank   •  If  not  -­‐  Either  select  another  material  or  impact  test  
  5. 5. Bo>om  –  Major  Concepts   Why  is  the  tank  bo3om  generally  thinner  than  the  bo3om  shell  course  ?   •  The  boAom  is  a  membrane  to  prevent  leaks   •  Generally  the  boAom  is  a  low  stresses  area   •  Near  the  boAom-­‐to-­‐shell  weld  the  stresses  are  higher   Defini>ons   •  Annular  Plate:  BoAom  plate  that  the  shell  rests  on  that  has  buA-­‐joints.    Generally  the  annular  plates  form  a  donut  with  the  inside  edges  straight   •  Sketch  Plate:  BoAom  plate  that  the  shell  rests  on  that  has  lap  joints.    Generally  the  sketch  plate  is  the  same  thickness  as  other  boAom  plates.   •  Three  Plate  Lap:  Intersec>on  of  right  angle  boAom  welds.  (3  plates  thick)   •  Plate  Extension:  Part  of  boAom  plate  that  extends  outside  the  shell  
  6. 6. Bo>om  –  Design  Issues   •  Min.  New  Thickness  -­‐6  mm  (0.236")  5.4.1   •  Minimum  Annular  Plate  Thick  Table  5-­‐1b   •  BoAom  Plate  Extension  -­‐2"  5.4.2   •  Sketch  Plates  Joints  -­‐  Single  Fillets  5.1.3.4   •  Annular  Plate  Joints  -­‐  BuA  5.1.5.6   •  Other  BoAom  -­‐  Full  Single  Fillet  5.1.5.4.   •  All  welds  -­‐  complete  penetra>on  &  fusion  (generally  welded  both  sides)   5.1.5.2/3   •  Ver>cal  joints  offset  by  "5t"  5.1.5.2.b   •  Courses  should  have  a  common  centerline  
  7. 7. Shell  –  Major  Concepts   •  Shell  is  designed  for  the  "sta>c  head"  pressure  from  the  product   •  Ver>cal  welds  are  much  higher  stressed  that  the  horizontal  welds           Which  shell  weld  is  most  cri>cal?  –  VERTICAL  
  8. 8. Shell  -­‐  Design   •  The  wall  thickness  for  each  course  must  be  calculated  Lower  courses  are   thicker.   The  shell  is  designed  to  hold  the  pressure  resul>ng  from  "sta>c  head"  (the   pressure  resul>ng  from  the  height  of  the  product.)  The  pressure  increases  as   the  liquid  height  increase.   Since  the  pressure  near  the  boAom  increases,  the  shell  must  be  thicker!  
  9. 9. Shell  -­‐  Thickness   •  1-­‐Foot  Method  -­‐  used  for  tanks  <  200  feet  5.6.3.1   •  Variable  Design  Point  Method  -­‐  required  on  tanks  >  200  feet  and  can  be   used  on  all  tanks  with  purchaser's  approval  5.6.4.1  (not  in  scope  )   •  Use  greater  of  "calculated  thickness"  or  the  "arbitrary  thickness"  5.6.1.1   Note!!!  Each  course  has  a  unique  reGrement  thickness.  The  reGrement    thickness  applies  to  the  whole  course!  A  tank  shell  with  5  courses  will    have  5  reGrement  thicknesses.   The  1-­‐Foot  Method  is  basically  a  form  of  "Barlow  s  formula"!!!   You  will  use  The  1-­‐Foot  Method  on  the  API  Exam.  You  will  not  be  responsible   to  calculate  tank  shell  thickness  using  the  Variable  Point  Design  Method  
  10. 10. Shell  –  Minimum  Thickness   API  650  Formula   •  Td=  [2.6  D  (  H-­‐1)]/Sd    G  +  CA        or   •  Tt=  [2.6  D  (  H-­‐1)G]/St   H  =  Liquid  height  from  boAom  of  course  G  =  Specific  Gravity   Sd  =  Allowable  Stress  -­‐  Product  Design  Stress   St  =  Allowable  Stress  –  Hydrosta>c  Design  Stress   Here's  how  to  solve  a  calcula>on.   1.  Draw  Sketch-­‐Useful  for  determining  "H"   2.  Copy  formula  from  Code   3.  List  data   4.  Solve  problem  (input  numbers)  below  the  formula   5.  Work  problem  ver>cally  down.  Don  't  jump  all  over  the  paper.   6.  Highlight  your  answer.  (Don't  forget  the  units!!!)  
  11. 11. Shell  –  NewThickness   New  Thickness  -­‐  Pick  largest  of  the  following:   1.  Calc  -­‐  td  Based  on  Product  Gravity  with  CA   2.  Calc-­‐A  Based  on  Hydrotest  without  CA   3.  Arbitrary  thickness  5.6.1.1     Why  2  Formulas?  -­‐  Product  &  Hydrotest   1.  The  tank  must  be  "strong  enough  "  to  hold  the  product  in  the  corroded   condi>on.   2.  It  must  also  be  "strong  enough  "  to  hold  the  hydrotest  in  the  non-­‐corroded    condi>on.  Since  the  hydrotest  is  a  "1  >me  event"  the  allowable  stresses    for  the  hydrotest  are  a  bit  higher  than  for  the  product  condi>on.  
  12. 12. Shell  -­‐  Fabrica3on   •  Cu[ng  &  Rolling  Plates  6.1.2/3   •  Preheat  Temperatures  Table  7-­‐1  b  No  welding  when:   Any  Moisture  -­‐  Atomic  hydrogen  enters  base  metal  Windy  and  Unshielded  -­‐   Lose  shielding  gas   •  Undercut  Limits  8.5.1.  b   •  Reinforcement  Limits  8.5.1.d&  8.1.3.4   •  Misalignment  Limits  7.2.3.1/2   DefiniGons   •  Peaking:  Affects  ver>cal  tank  welds.  Caused  from  not  ge[ng  the  end  of  a   plate  rolled.  The  weld  "pooches-­‐out".   •  Banding:  Affects  horizontal  tank  welds.  Distor>on  caused  from  shrinkage   of  weld  metal  as  it  cools.  The  weld  "sucks-­‐in  ".   Misalignment  Limits  
  13. 13. Shell  -­‐  RT   RT-­‐  Primary  NDE  method  for  shell  welds   Number  of  Radiographs  8.1.2  &  Fig.  &  Fig  8.1   Requirements  same  for  each  Welder   Thicker  plate  requires  more  RTs   VerGcal  welds  more  RTs  than  Horizontals   More  RTs  at  IntersecGons   Minimum  diagnosGc  length  -­‐  6“     •  Ver3cal  spot  radiograph  in  accordance  with  6.1.2.2,  Item  a:  one  in  the  first  3  m  (10  U)  and  one  in  each  30  m  (100   U)  thereaUer,  25%  of  which  shall  be  at  intersec3ons.   •  Horizontal  spot  radiograph  in  accordance  with  6.1.2.3:  one  in  the  first  10  feet  and  one  in  each  60  m  (200  U)   thereaUer.   •  3Ver3cal  spot  radiograph  in  each  ver3cal  seam  in  the  lowest  course  (see  6.1.2.2,  Item  b).  Spot  radiographs  that   sa3sfy  the  requirements  of  Note  1  for  the  lowest  course  may  be  used  to  sa3sfy  this  requirement.   •  Spot  radiographs  of  all  intersec3ons  over  10  mm  (3/8  in.)  (see  6.1.2.2,  Item  b).   •  Spot  radiograph  of  bo>om  of  each  ver3cal  seam  in  lowest  shell  course  over  10  mm  (%  in.)  (see  6.1.2.2,  Item  b).   •  Complete  radiograph  of  each  ver3cal  seam  over  25  mm  (1  in.).  The  complete  radiograph  may  include  the  spot   radiographs  of  the  intersec3ons  if  the  film  has  a  minimum  width  of  100  mm  (4  in.)  (see  6.1.2.2,  Item  c).  
  14. 14. NDE  General   NDE  Technician  Qualifica>on   •  RT&  UT-­‐ASNT  (SNT-­‐TC-­‐IA)  8.1.3.2/8.3.2.4  &  App.  U   •  MT&  PT  –  Eye  vision  &  Competent  8.2.3/8.4.3   •  Visual  -­‐  Not  specified   •  Vacuum  Box  -­‐  Eye  Vision  and  Competent  8.6.4     NDE  Methods  per  ASME  B&PV  Sec>on  V  Acceptance  Standards   •  RT  -­‐  ASME  B&PVSec>on  VIII  8.1.5   •  UT  -­‐  Agreement  between  purchaser  &  manufacturer  8.3.2.5   •  MT  -­‐  ASME  B&PV  Sec>on  VIII  8.2.4   •  PT-­‐ASME  B&PV  Sec>on  VIII  8.4.4  
  15. 15. Shell  –  Inspec3on  &  Test   •  Other  Weld  InspecGon    No  cracks,  arc  strikes  8.5.1.a    Surface  Porosity  Limits  8.5.  1.  c     •  Other  InspecGons  (  Dimensional  InspecGons  )    Plumbness  1/200  of  tank  height  7.5.2    Roundness  Table  in  7.5.3    Peaking  &  Banding  1/  2"  7.5.4     •  Hydrotest  or  Air/Vacuum  Test  7.3.5/6  
  16. 16. Tank  Roof   •  Primary  funcGon  -­‐  Keep  product  in  and  keep  the  atmosphere  out   •  The  roof  is  generally  designed  for  low  pressure.   •  Two  basic  types  -­‐  Fixed  and  floaGng   •  FloaGng  Roof-­‐  Minimize  emissions  by  minimizing  the  airspace  
  17. 17. Floa3ng  Roof             Design  InformaGon  for  FloaGng  Roofs   •  Appendix  C  -­‐  External  Floa>ng   •  Appendix  H  -­‐  Internal  Floa>ng  
  18. 18. Tank  Seals   Primary  Seal              Secondary  Seal   Normally  a  Mechanical        Normally  a  wiper   Shoe                Minimizes  most  vapor  losses               Mechanical  Shoes   •  Many  companies  have  special  designs  for  mechanical  shoes.  Normally  the   major  design  differences  pertain  to  the  method  used  to  push  the  shoe   against  the  tank  shell.  Coil  springs,  lever  springs,  and  weights  have  been   used.  BeAer  designs  allow  for  in-­‐service  maintenance.   •  Shoes  can  be  used  on  riveted  tanks.  Obviously  there  will  be  more  vapor   losses  since  the  shoe  travels  over  the  rivets.  
  19. 19. Tank  Roof   •  Design   Lap  welded  single  full  fillet  on  top  5.1.5.9   Plate  thickness  -­‐  3/16"  +  CA  5.10.2.2     •  FabricaGon   Reasonableness  7.2.5     •  InspecGon  OpGons  7.3.7   Gas>ght  roof-­‐  Air  test  or  Vacuum  test   Non-­‐gas>ght  roof  -­‐  Visual  
  20. 20. Shell-­‐to-­‐Bo>om  Weld   •  This  weld  and  surrounding  area  is  one  of  the  highest  stressed  parts  of  the   tanks   •  Weld  can  fail  due  to  seAlement  or  corrosion   •  Design  5.1.5.7   Fillet  weld  both  sides  of  the  shell.  Weld  size  -­‐  Normally   Not  less  than  the  thinner  of  the  parts  joined  or  Table  in  5.1.5.7   Not  greater  than  ½  "   •  Inspec>on  -­‐  Various  Op>ons  7.2.4.1   Magne>c  Par>cle   Various  Penetrants  (penetrant  or  light  diesel  oil)   Right  Angle  Vacuum  Box   Air  Test  -­‐  Pressure  Test  between  the  fillets    
  21. 21. Roof-­‐to-­‐Shell  Weld   •  On  most  Cone  Roofs  this  joint  is  designed  to  fail  It's  called  a  "frangible   joint“  5.10.2.6   If  the  roof-­‐to-­‐shell  weld  does  not  fail  then  the  shell-­‐to-­‐bo3om  weld  will  fail.   •  Design   Fillet  weld  size  does  not  exceed  3/16"   The  roof  slope  does  not  exceed  2"  rise  in  12"  run   Design  details  per  Figure  F-­‐2  a-­‐e   •  Inspec>on  7.3.2.2   Visual   •  Tank  Overpressure   The  tank  pressure  may  increase  by:   1.  Blocked  or  non-­‐opera>ng  vent   2.  Product  inflow  is  greater  than  vent  capacity   3.  Internal  "poof“  
  22. 22. Other   •  Welding  9.2/3/4    Procedures  &  Welders  Qualified  ASME  Sect  IX    Weld  ID  -­‐  All  welds  except  roof  and  flange-­‐to-­‐nozzle    Stamp  weld  every  3  feet,  or    Weld  map     •  Nameplates  10.1.1    A3ach  adjacent  to  manhole    Le3ers  not  less  than  5/32"  high     •  Repads  7.3.4    PneumaGc  test  at  I5psig  
  23. 23. Tank  Inspec3on   API  653Sec3on  1  Thru  6  &  App  B  
  24. 24. Module  Objec3ves   Let’s  Inspect  &  Evaluate   At  the  end  of  this  module  you  should  know:   •  Scope  of  API  653   •  Types  of  tank  inspecGons  and  specific  requirements  for  these  inspecGons   •  How  to  evaluate  corrosion  pa3erns;  generalized,  localized,  and  pilng   •  How  to  evaluate  bo3om  se3lement  ,     And...  much  more  !!!     Most  of  653  is  on  the  closed-­‐book  por>on  of  the  exam.  Included  in  the  open-­‐ book  por>on  of  the  exam:   1.  Calcula>ons  (except  Corrosion  Rates  &  Intervals)   2.  Tables  &  charts  (except  Minimum  BoAom  Thickness)   3.  Some  details  (e.g.  design  stress  -­‐  reconstructed  tanks)  
  25. 25. API  653  -­‐  Scope   "What  is  the  purpose  of  API  653?“   •  To  decide  Tank  Inspec>on(How,  When,  Where  )   •  To  repair  boAoms,  shells  ,  roof   •  To  decide  altera>on  (  reducing  height  or  change  in  specific  gravity  )   •  Reconstruc>on  Requirements     Defini>ons   Repair:  Work  needed  to  Restore  tank  to  a  Suitable  Safe  condi>on  (RESTORE)   AlteraGon:  Work  performed  that  changes  Physical  Dimensions  (PHYSICAL   CHANGE)  
  26. 26. Tank  Roof  Evalua3on   Verify  structural  integrity  of  roof   Minimum  roof  thickness   •  Average  thickness  0.090"  in  any  100  in2   •  No  holes   •  Floa>ng  roofs  -­‐  no  holes  by  next  inspec>on   Pipe  columns  -­‐  check  for  inside  corrosion   Other  evaluaGon  criteria   •  External  Floaters  -­‐  API  650  Appendix  C   •  Internal  Floaters  -­‐  API  650  Appendix  H   What  is  the  basis  for  this  rule?  The  minimum  average  thickness  can  not  be  less   than  0.090"  in  any  100  in2?   An  area  of  100  in2  is  about  the  size  of  your  shoe!  They  don't  want  you  to  fall   through  the  roof!  
  27. 27. Tank  Shell  Evalua3on   •  How  Corrosion  Types  are  Evaluated  v  Uniform  Corrosion   •  Use  tmin  calcs  from  API  653  (with  "H-­‐1")    Localized  Corrosion  (LTA)   •  Corrosion  Averaging  and  use  tmin  calcs  from    API  653  (with  "H"  only)    Pi[ng   •  Evaluate  both  pit  depth  &  ver>cal  length     Defini>ons   LTA:  Localized  Thin  Area  (a  locally  corroded  area)   This  is  a  common  term  that  found  in  API  5  79.   (Fitness  for  Service)  
  28. 28. Uniform  Corrosion   The  tmin  for  a  Shell  Course  is:                                4.3.3.     This  is  similar  to  the  I-­‐foot  formula  in  API  650,  but  some    differences.  This   formula  includes  an  "E",  and  "S"  comes  from   API  653  ,  
  29. 29. Minimum  Shell  Calc  Notes   1.  tmin  (minimum  thickness)  -­‐  Based  on  calc,  but  can  not  be  less  that  0.100  "     2.  D  &  G  (Diameter  and  Specific  Gravity)  -­‐  No  changes  from  API  650     3.  H  (Liquid  Height)  -­‐  Distance  from  boAom  of  course  to  top  of  product     4.  S  (Allowable  Stress)  -­‐  See  Table  4-­‐1.  Based  on  the  course.     5.  E  (Joint  Efficiency)  -­‐  See  Table  4-­‐2.  Based  on  tank  construc>on  code   Note!  The  tmin  for  a  shell  course  of  an  exis>ng  tank  can  be  calculated  using  the    tmin  formula  in  4.3.3.   This  formula  looks  the  same  as  the  tmin  formula  in  API  650.  But,  the  allowable   stresses  are  higher.  This  results  in  a  thinner  tmin  as  compared  to  the  API  650  tmin   calcula>on.   API  653  has  a  lower  safety  factor.  
  30. 30. So  here’s  the  work  process:  During  tank  design,  the  designer    calculates  tmin  using  API  650  and  adds  corrosion  allowance.  Then    picks  appropriate  nominal  plate  thickness.  But,  once  oil  is  put  into    the  tank,  you  can  throw  away  the  designer's  tmin  and  recalculate    using  the  API  653  formula.  
  31. 31. Joint  Efficiency  –  “E”   •  Joint  Efficiency  is  a  safety  factor  based  on  the  joint  type  &  amount  of   inspec>on  of  the  welds   •  "E"for  welded  tanks  -­‐  See  Table  4-­‐2   •  E  =  1.0  when  corroded  area  is  away  from  welds   •  (Greater  of  1”or  twice  the  plate  thickness)  
  32. 32. Joint  Efficiency  –  “E”  
  33. 33. Shell  Corrosion  Averaging   The  tmin  for  a  corroded  area  is:     4.3.3  .  1.b     This  is  similar  to  the  1-­‐foot  formula  in  API  650,  but  there  are  some  differences.   This  formula  includes  "E"  and  does  not  have  an  "H-­‐l“.  Also  "S"  comes  from  API   653     H  -­‐  Liquid  Height     Distance  from  the  BOTTOM  OF  THE  CORRODED  AREA  to   the  top  of  the  product  
  34. 34. Shell  Corrosion  Averaging   Minimum  Shell  Calc  Notes!     1.    tmin  (minimum  thickness)  -­‐  Based  on  calc,  but  can  not  be  less  that   0.100“   2.    D  &  G  (Diameter  and  Specific  Gravity)  -­‐  No  changes  from  API  650   3.    H  (Liquid  Height)  -­‐  Distance  from  boAom  of  "L  "  to  top  of  product   4.    S  (Allowable  Stress)  -­‐  See  Table  4-­‐1.  Based  on  which  course.   5.    E  (Joint  Efficiency)  -­‐  See  Table  4-­‐2.  Based  on  tank  construc>on  code    Welded  tanks:  E  =  1.0  when  corroded  area  is  away  from  the  weld  by  the    greater  of  I"  or  twice  the  plate  thickness.   6.    LTA  can  also  be  evaluated  by  ASME  B&PV  Code  Sec>on  VIII  Div.  2  
  35. 35. Shell  Corrosion  Averaging   1.    Find  "t2"  -­‐  minimum  thickness  in  corroded  area   2.    Calc  Cri>cal  Length  "L  "  -­‐  the  ver>cal  limits  for  averaging   3.    Select  ver>cal  line(s)  to  measure  (may  need  mul>ple  lines)   4.    Take  equally  spaced  thickness  readings  along  each  linefo,    a  distance  of  "L  "  (at  least  5  readings  per  line)   5.    Average  the  readings  for  each  line.   6.    Determine  "t/"  -­‐  the  lowest  average  thickness  of  the  lines   7.    Calculate  tmin  per  API  653  4.3.3.1.b   8.    Evalua>on  criteria:   a.    t,  >  tmiH  +  (CR  x  Interval)      and   b.    t2  >  0.60  tmin  +  (CR  x  Interval)  
  36. 36. Cri3cal  Length  Notes   1.  "L  "  is  always  3.7  (Dt2  )  1/2.  There  is  no  limit  to  the  horizontal  dimension   of  the  corroded  area!     2.    "L  "  can  not  exceed  40  inches     3.    Take  a  minimum  of  five  equally  spaced  readings  along  each  line.  You  can    take  more.  O|en  5  readings  are  very  far  apart!  The  ver>cal  line  does  not    need  to  include  the  "t2  "  measurement  but  generally  it  is  taken  at  center    and  then  ver>cal  lines  are  drawn.  
  37. 37. Liquid  Height  Calcs  -­‐  LTA   •  Product  Fill  Height  -­‐  LTA   H  =  Set/2.6  DG     Hydrotest  Fill  Height  –LTA   H  =  Set/2.6  D     Formula  Differences:   1)  No  Specific  Gravity.  For  water  G=  1.0   2)  St  is  hydrotest  allowable  stress  from  Table  4-­‐1    These  "H's"  are  from  boAom  of  the  corroded  area.  Opera>ons    needs  overall  fill  height.  To  determine  "H,Mi"  add  the  distance    from  tank  boAom  to  the  boAom  of  corroded  area.  
  38. 38. Shell  -­‐  Pilng   1.  Length  Evalua>on   a.  In  8"  verGcal  line,  sum  length  of  Pits  -­‐  "Ps"   b.  Acceptance  Criteria:  Ps  ≤  2"     2  Depth  Evalua>on   a)  Calculate  "trem  ";  (remaining  thickness)    trem  =  tact  -­‐  tpit   b)  Acceptance  Criteria:  trem  ≥  0.5  tmin  
  39. 39. Other  Deteriora3on   •  Shell  distorGons  -­‐  Evaluate  Other  Flaws   •  Cracks  -­‐  thoroughly  examine   •  Cracks  in  shell-­‐to-­‐boAom  weld  -­‐  This  is  cri>cal  and  must  be  repaired  
  40. 40. Tank  Bo>om  Evalua3on   Bo3om  Leaks  –  The  tank  failures  are  a3ributed  to   Top-­‐side  corrosion   •  Product   •  Water   •  Sediment   Bo3om-­‐side  corrosion   •  Pad  Materials   •  Debris  in  pad   •  Ground  Water   Se3lement  issues   BoAom  -­‐  Rela>vely  thin   BoAom-­‐side  not  visible  
  41. 41. Inspec3ng  Tank  Bo>oms   Special  tools  have  been  developed  for  inspec>ng  tank  boAoms.  Commonly  used   today  are  Magne>c  Flux  Leakage  (MFL)  tools.  MFL  can  be  used  to  find  both   top-­‐side  and  boAom-­‐side  corrosion.  It  works  using  the  same  principle  as  a   Magne>c  Par>cle  examina>on.   The  area  being  is  examined  is  saturated  with  magne>c  flux.  If  there  is  a  thin  area,   some  of  the  flux  "pops  out"  of  the  material.  The  bigger  the  void,  the  greater  the   amount  of  flux  that  "pops  out".  The  scanning  machine  has  a  device  that   measures  the  amount  of  flux  that  pop's  out.  MFL  can  not  precisely  size  the   remaining  wall,  but  can  provide  a  good  es>mate.  O|en  UT  follow-­‐up  is   performed  at  indica>ons  found  by  MFL.   The  MFL  tools  are  very  specialized.  API  653  Appendix  G  provides  a  way  to  qualify   tank  scanning  tools  and  tank  scanning  operators.  
  42. 42. Tank  Bo>om  Calcula3on   Future  Thickness  (MRT)     MRT  =  RT  –  Or  (StPr  +  UPr)     Future  Thickness  =  Current  Lowest  Thickness  –  Future  Corrosion  Loss   MRT  =  Minimum  Remaining  Thickness  (future)   RT=  Current  Remaining  Thickness   Or  =  In-­‐Service  Interval   StPr  =  Top-­‐side  Corrosion  Rate   UPr  =  BoAom-­‐side  Corrosion  Rate   &uture  =  tcurrent  -­‐  Iinterval  (Rtop-­‐side  +  Rbo>omside)  
  43. 43. Table  4.4:  Bo>om  Plate   Minimum  Thickness   Min.  Bo3om  Thickness   Tank  Bo3om  and   FoundaGon  Design   0.100”   No  means  to  detect  and  contain  a  boAom   leak   0.050”   Means  to  detect  and  contain  a  boAom   leak   0.050”   Applied  tank  boAom  reinforced  lining,  >   0.050  “  thick,  installed  per  API  652  
  44. 44. Bo>om  Evalua3on  Notes   1.  Current  Remaining  Thickness  (RT)  -­‐  The  lowest  boAom  thickness  AFTER    repairs  have  been  completed.   2.  Top-­‐side  Corrosion  Rate  (SrPr)  =  0  ipy  IF  top-­‐side  is  coated  AND  coa>ng  life    exceed  interval.   3.  BoAom-­‐side  Corrosion  Rate  (Upr)  =  0  ipy  IF  boAom  has  effec>ve  cathodic    protec>on.   4.  BoAom-­‐side  Corrosion  Rate  -­‐  Assume  "linear  rate  "  based  on  age  of  tank.   5.  Acceptance  standard:   MRT  >  minimum  allowed  per  API  653   a.  BoAom  away  from  cri>cal  zone  -­‐  Table  4.4  (either  0.100  "  or  0.050")   b.  Cri>cal  zone  -­‐  Paragraph  4.4.5.4   c.  External  floor  projec>on  -­‐  Paragraph  4.4.5.7  
  45. 45. Tank  Bo>om  Evalua3on   The  CriGcal  Zone  -­‐  Within  3"  of  shell   •  This  is  a  higher  stressed  area   •  Minimum  thickness   Smaller  of:  1/  2  tOrig  (of  bo3om)  or  'A  tmin  (of  shell)   But  must  be>  0.100"   •  External  ProjecGon   Minimum  thickness:  0.100"   Minimum  projec>on:  3/8"  (0.375")   •  Rest  of  Bo3om  -­‐  Table  4-­‐4   Either  0.100"  or  0.050"  
  46. 46. Annular  Plates   *  Minimum  Thickness   •  Specific  Gravity  <1.0    API  653  Table  4-­‐5   •  Specific  Gravity  >1.0    API  650  Table  3-­‐1    S1*  Course  Thickness  "t“   •  Nominal  thickness    "f  BoAom  Course  Stress  
  47. 47. Tank  Founda3on   •  Calcining  (loss  of  water  of  hydra>on)    Exposed  to  high  temperature    Causes  cracks   •  Chemical  AAack   •  Cracks    Hairline  cracks  -­‐  liAle  affect  on  strength    Moisture  in  cracks      Freeze  -­‐  swell  &  propagate  crack      Corrodes  exposed  rebar   •  Anchor  Bolts  Distor>on   SeAlement  or  overpressure  upli|.  
  48. 48. Bri>leness  and  Toughness   •  Bri3leness:  "Separa>on  of  a  solid  accompanied  by  liAle  or  no  macroscopic   plas>c  deforma>on.  Typically,  briAle  fracture  occurs  by  rapid  crack   propagaGon  with  less  expenditure  of  energy  than  for  duc>le  fracture.   •  Toughness:  "The  ability  of  a  metal  to  absorb  energy  and  deform  plas>cally   before  fracturing.  It  is  usually  measured  by  the  energy  absorbed  in  a  notch   impact  test..   Tank  materials  must  have  high  enough  toughness  to  resist  briAle  fracture.  
  49. 49. Material  Selec3on   •  For  new  materials  used  during  repairs  &  alteraGon   •  API  653  "must  meet  requirements  of  current  applicable  std”(That's   generally  API  650)   •  API  650  Material  SelecGon:   •  Sets  the  tank  Minimum  Design  Temperature  -­‐  Fig  4-­‐2    15  °F  above  lowest  one-­‐day  Temperature   •  Groups  materials  with  common  toughness.  (I-­‐VI)   •  Determines  when  impact  tes>ng  is  required  -­‐  Fig  4-­‐1b    Based  on  thickness  &  Group  Number   •  Sets  acceptance  stdsfor  impact  test  -­‐  Table  4-­‐5b    
  50. 50. What  Affects  Toughness?   1.  Material  Type  -­‐  Some  materials  have  higher  toughness.     2.  Metal  Temperature  -­‐  Generally,  the  lower  the  temperature,  the  lower  the   toughness.     3.  Metal  Thickness  -­‐  Generally,  the  thinner  the  material,  the  higher  the   toughness.  This  doesn  't  appear  to  make  sense,  but  during  fabrica>on,   stresses  get  "locked  into  "  materials.  Thicker  materials  have  more  stresses   "locked-­‐in  "  and  are  also  less  flexible.  This  tends  to  make  thicker  materials   more  briAle.    
  51. 51. Past  Bri>le  Failures   •  All  reported  bri3le  fracture  failures  have  occurred  at  either:   Hydrotest   First  filling  in  cold  weather   Change  to  lower  temperature  service   A|er  repair  or  altera>on        5.2.2     Key  API  653  Premise:   "Experience  shows  that  once  a  tank  has  demonstrated  the  ability  to  withstand   the  combined  effects  of  maximum  liquid  level  and  lowest  opera>ng   temperature  without  failing,  the  risk  of  failure  due  to  briAle  fracture  with   con>nued  service  is  minimal."5.2.2  
  52. 52. Bri>le  Fracture  Evalua3on   •  Evaluate  bri3le  fracture  potenGal  when  changing  service  to:    lower  temperature    higher  specific  gravity   •  Also  consider  impacts  of:    Non-­‐Code  repairs  &  altera>ons    Tank  deteriora>on  since  original  hydrotest      5.2.3   A  hydrotest  may  be  used  to  demonstrate  the  tank's  fitness  for  the  new  service   •  Safe  to  use  if  any  of  the  following  are  true:    Tank  built  to  API  650  7th  EdiGon  (1980)  or  later  and  operates  in  same  service    Prior  hydrotest  and  all  post-­‐hydro  repairs  met  Code    Shell  thickness  is  <  0.500"    Operates  at  temperature  >  60  °F    Actual  shell  stress  is  <  7000  psi    Steel  meets  API  650  toughness  requirements    Steel  meets  API  653  Figure  5.2    Tank  full  at  lowest  one-­‐day  temperature  
  53. 53. Bri>les  Fracture  Evalua3on  
  54. 54. Internal  Alterna3ves   Robo>cs  -­‐  If  only  boAom  thickness  measurements  are  needed  (6.4.1.2)   Risked  Based  Inspec>on  (RBI)  (6.4.2.4)   •  Factors  -­‐  Likelihood  &  Consequence   •  Can  be  used  to  exceed  20  year  max.  on  Internal   •  Can  be  used  to  lower  Table  6-­‐1  minimums   External  access  to  BoAom  (6.5)  
  55. 55. Scheduled  Inspec3ons   Inspec:on   type   Inspec:on  Interval   Inspector   Qualifica:on   Key  Factor   Rou3ne  In  Service   Monthly   Operator   Type   Check  from   ground  Gross   Problems   External   Lesser  of  5Years   or1/4  Life   of  shell   Authorized   Inspector   Not  described  See   Appendix  C   Shell  UT   New/Unknown  CR:5   Years  Known  CR:  15   Years  or  ½  Life  of   Shell   Code  unclear   One  who  is   competent   Shell  Thickness   Internal   New/Unknown  CR: 10  Years  Known  CR:   Lesser  then  20  Years   or  full  bo>om   –life   Authorized   Inspector   The  bo>om  
  56. 56. Se>lement  Surveys   •  SeAlement  surveys  should  periodically  be  done    The  interval  is  not  specified    Use  judgment  based  on  soil  condi>ons  &  experience   •  External  Measurements    Number  of  readings:  N  =  D/10    Equally  spaced  with  a  minimum  of  8  readings    Maximum  spacing  between  readings  32  feet   •  Internal  Measurements    At  shell,  use  same  spacing  as  external  measurements    Maximum  internal  spacing  10'  
  57. 57.                     Excessive  seAlement  increases  the  stress  in  the  boAom-­‐to-­‐shell  weld.   Excessive  seAlement  should  be  corrected  by  re-­‐leveling  the  tank.  This  is   expensive  and  should  not  be  done  unless  absolutely  necessary  
  58. 58. Types  of  Se>lement   Uniform  -­‐  BoAom  stays  flat    Minor  problems    Pipe  alignment   Rigid  or  Planar  Tilt  -­‐  BoAom  is  flat  but  >lted    More  problems    Pipe  alignment    FloaGng  roof    Tank  gauge  tables   Out-­‐of-­‐Plane-­‐  BoAom  is  not  flat  .    Also  called  "Differen>al“    Most  common  type    Poten>al  Major  Problem    Same  as  Rigid  Tilt    Plus  overstress  the  Bo3om-­‐to-­‐Shell  weld  
  59. 59. Acceptance  Criteria   •  Out-­‐of-­‐Plane  Se3lement   –  Use  Cosine  Curve  to  determine  deflec>on  "S"   –  Use  formulas  in  B.2.2.4     •  Bo3om  Se3lement  -­‐  Depression  or  Bulges   –  Use  formula  in  B.3.3    BB  =  0.3  7R            "R"  is  in  feet        "  B"  is  in  inches  
  60. 60. Acceptance  Criteria               Example:  EvaluaGng  a  Bo3om  Depression   Depression  Diameter  =  10'(Radius  is  5')   B  =  0.37R  =  0.37x5  =  1.85"  (Answer  is  in  inches!)     Fig  B  10  is  a  graphic  representa>on  of  the  formula.     Note!  Most  companies  have  a  computer  program  to  calculate  acceptance   limits  for  Out-­‐of-­‐Plane  SeAlement.  
  61. 61. Edge  Se>lement   •  Edge  Se3lement  EvaluaGon    Fig.  B.I  1  SeAlement  is  parallel  to  boAom  fillet  welds    Fig.  B.  12  SeAlement  is  perpendicular  to  boAom  fillet  welds  
  62. 62. Edge  Se>lement  Evalua3on             Note!  Many  tank  floors  are    installed  with  a  slope.    Edge  seAlement  should  be    measured  from  the    original  slope.  See  Figure    B-­‐6!  
  63. 63. Se>lement  Example                     Note!  What  if  the  seAlement  is  somewhere  between  parallel  and    perpendicular?  The  engineer  can  evaluate  using  the  formula  in  B.3.4.4.  If    you  want  to  evaluate,  without  using  that  complex  formula,  just  use  Chart    B-­‐ll  Parallel  to  the  Shell.  It  is  more  conserva>ve  than  the  formula.  If  it    meets  B-­‐ll  criteria,  then  it  will  also  pass  the  B3.4.4  formula.  If  it  does  not    pass  the  B-­‐ll  chart,  then  see  the  engineer.  
  64. 64. Repairs,  Altera>ons  &   Reconstruc>on   API  653  -­‐  Sec>ons  7  thru  13  API  653   Cer>fica>on  
  65. 65. Mobile  Objec3ves   In  this  module  you  will  learn  specific  requirements  for  Repairs,  Altera>ons  &   Reconstruc>on.   •  Materials  that  can  be  used   •  Design   •  Fabrica>on  &  Welding   •  NDE  &  Tes>ng   •  Record  keeping     Defini>ons   Repair:  Work  necessary  to  RESTORE  a  tank  to  a  condi>on  SUITABLE  for  SAFE    opera>on.   AlteraGon:  PHYSICAL  CHANGE.  Work  performed  that  changes  the  physical    dimensions  of  a  tank  
  66. 66. Reconstruc3on  Materials   •  Structural    Reused  -­‐  ASTMA  7  as  a  minimum    New  -­‐  ASTMA36  as  a  minimum   •  Flanges    Meet  As-­‐built  standard   •  Fasteners/BolGng    Current  applicable  standard   •  Roofs,  Bo3om  Plate/Wind  girders    Check  for  excessive  corrosion   •  As-­‐Built  Standard?   •  This  is  the  original  construc>on  standard,  (see  3.2)  
  67. 67. Which  Code?   •  As-­‐built  (original  construc>on)  Standard    Exis>ng  Welds    Exis>ng  Penetra>ons    Flange  Material    Roof  Design     •  Current  Applicable  Standard    New  Weld  Joint  Details    Replacement/New  Penetra>ons    Wind  girder  Design    All  New  Materials    Fasteners  Material  
  68. 68. Shell  Design   •  Shell  Welds    BuA  Welds  with  complete  Penetra>on/Fusion   •  Allowable  Stresses    Per  API  650    If  not  listed;        Lesser  of:  2Y/3  &  2T/5  (design)              Lesser  of:  3Y/4&  3T/7  (hydro)   •  Thickness  Readings  must  be  taken  within  180    Days   •  Joint  Efficiency    New  Welds  -­‐  Based  on  Design  &  Inspec>on    Exis>ng  Welds  -­‐  Original  Standard  
  69. 69. Shell  Replacement  Plates   •  Plate  Thickness   –  ≥to  tnominal  of  thicker  neighbor     •  Various  Plate  Shape   –  Circular   –  Rectangular   –  "Dog-­‐house“     •  Corners   –  Rounded   –  Unless  corner  stops  at  an  exis>ng  horizontal  weld  
  70. 70. Shell  Replacement  Plates   •  Plate  Size  Fig.  9-­‐1   –  Based  on  plate  thickness   –  Minimum  size:  12“   •  Circular  shape   –  Minimum  radius:  6  “     •  Exis>ng  horizontals   –  Cut  at  least  12"  beyond  new  ver>cal  welds  
  71. 71. Shell  Lap  Patches   •  Three  applicaGons     1.  Cover  up  holes  (9.3.2)    Weld  inside  &  outside     2.  Reinforce  LTA  's  (9.3.3)    Similar  to  repad     3.  Repair  small  leaks  (9.3.4)    Watch  out  -­‐  trapped  liquids!  
  72. 72. Shell  Repairs  Op3ons   •  Grind  out  9.4   –  O|en  done  for  crack   –  Adequate  remaining  thickness   –  Smooth  contour   •  Grind  out  &  weld  buildup  9.4   –  Smooth  contour   •  Replacement  plate  9.2   –  BuA  welded   –  Complete  Penetra>on   –  Complete  Fusion   –  Weld  Spacing  Fig.  9-­‐1   •  Greater  spacing  from  ver>cal  welds   •  Lap  patch  9.3   –  Many  restric>ons  
  73. 73. Shell  Repairs  Op3ons  
  74. 74. Exis3ng  Weld  Defects   •  Cracks,  Lack  of  Fusion,  Rejectable  Slag    Evaluate  if  it  needs  repaired    If  so,  grind  out  completely   •  Excessive  Reinforcement  -­‐  Judgment   •  Undercut  -­‐  Judgment   •  Corrosion  at  Weld  -­‐  Repair  by  welding  if  addiGonal  thickness  is  required   •  Arc  Strikes  –  Repair   •  Why  repair  Arc  Strikes?   •  The  cool-­‐down  rate  of  molten  metal  significantly  affects  the  mechanical   proper>es  of  a  metal,  i.e.  Strength,  toughness,  etc.  Steels  that  cool  down   rapidly  can  form  Martensite  (a  metal  phase  that  is  very  hard  and  very  briAle.)   •  When  an  arc  strike  occurs,  a  very  small  bit  of  molten  metal  is  deposited  on  the   base  metal.  This  small  amount  of  molten  metal  cools  down  very  rapidly   causing  a  hard  briAle  spot.  This  is  an  ideal  place  for  a  crack  to  ini>ate.   •  Since  the  hard  briAle  metal  is  not  very  deep,  arc  strikes  can  be  repaired  by   removing  a  few  mils  from  the  metal  surface.  
  75. 75. Penetra3ons   •  Adding  Reinforcement  Plates  to  exis>ng    API  650    API  653  Fig.  9.3  &  9.4     •  Repairs  API  650   •  New  Nozzles  API  650  
  76. 76. Nozzle  Spacing   •  If  replacement  bo3om  causes  nozzles  to  be  too  close  to  bo3om   •  Trim  the  boAom  of  the  repad   •  Replace  the  repad   •  •  Thicker  repad,  but  smaller  diameter   •  3.  Raise  the  nozzle  assembly  -­‐  tombstone  shape  Fig.9-­‐5    Why  Nozzle  Spacing?    Nozzles  are  actually  "holes  "  in  the  shell.  The  code  does  not  want  a  "hole  "    too  close  to  the  boAom-­‐to-­‐shell  weld.    API  650  specifies  minimum  distances  between:    Nozzles  and  boAoms   •  Repads  and  boAoms   •  The  boAom  of  the  shell  is  rela>vely  highly  stressed.  And  the  area  around  a   nozzle  is  rela>vely  higher  stressed.  The  code  does  not  want  these  higher   stressed  areas  to  overlap.  
  77. 77. Bo>om  Repairs  –  Cri3cal  Zone   •  The  "Cri>cal  Zone"    High  stressed  boAom  area   •  Welding  9.10.1.2.1    Widely  scaAer  pits    2"  in  8"  length    >  0.100"a‚illetweld    Grind  flush  and  examine  Cracks    Shell-­‐to-­‐boAom  weld   •  Lap  Patches  9.10.1.1.e    Permanent  repairs    Many  limita>ons  Fig.9-­‐9   •  Replace  boAom  plates    Required  'd  if  other  op>ons    are  not  acceptable  
  78. 78. Bo>om  Repairs  –  Cri3cal  Zone   Defini>on:   Cri>cal  Zone:  Por>on  of  tank  boAom  within  3  inch  of  the  inside  edge  of  the   shell.   Measured  radially  inward.  
  79. 79. Bo>om  Repairs  –  Non  Cri3cal  Zone   •  Weld  overlay    Size  not  limited    Remove  surface  irregulari>es  before  welding     •  Lap  patches  (permanent  repairs)    Not  as  many  limita>ons  as  in  cri>cal  zone    Can  over-­‐lap  an  exis>ng  patch    Can  not  use  if  excessive  seAlement     •  Non-­‐welded  patches    Do  not  "add  corrosion  allowance  ",  but  may    reduce  corrosion  rate  4.4.5.6  
  80. 80. Roofs   •  Fixed  Roofs    Replacement  plates:  3/16"+  CA    Supports:  Don't  exceed  API  650  stress  levels  I    Roof-­‐to-­‐shell  joint:  Meet  API  650  Floa>ng  Roofs   •  Floa>ng  Roofs    External:  Any  method  acceptable    Internal:  Original  construcGon  std  or  API  650    Pontoon  Repairs:  Reweld  or  lap  patch    Tank  Seals  Repairs:  Primary  &  Secondary   Not  much  is  men>on  since  seals  are  regulated  by    environmental  groups  and  seal  types  vary  significantly    between  vendors  
  81. 81. Hot  Taps   •  Nozzle  size-­‐to-­‐shell  thickness  limita>ons  Table  9-­‐1   •  New  Nozzle  Loca>on  -­‐  In  tank  shell  below  liquid  level   •  Not  allowed  if  welding  causes  environmental  cracking   •  Procedure  per  API  2201  &  Qualified  Operator   •  Minimum  of  4  UT  readings  at  nozzle  loca>on   •  Nozzle  thickness  -­‐  Pipe  Extra  Strong   •  During  welding  -­‐  Liquid  level  at  least  3  feet  above  hot  tap   •  Welds:  Full  penetra>on  Nozzle-­‐to-­‐Shell  &  Pad-­‐to-­‐  Nozzle   •  Weld  Electrode  -­‐  Low  Hydrogen  Electrode   •  Test  Re-­‐pad  -­‐15  psig  pneuma>c  test   •  Test  Nozzle  -­‐  pressure  test  prior  to  hot  tapping   •  Pt  =  0.65  x  H  x  G  
  82. 82. Hot  Taps  –  Nozzle  Spacing   This  table  applies  if  any  of  the  following  apply:   1.  Shell  plate  has  recognized  toughness  (e.g.  meets  API  650  requirements  or  API    653  Figure  5-­‐1)   2.  Maximum  thickness  is  ½”.     If  those  condi>ons  are  not  met,  then  the  hot  tap  is  limited  to:   1.  Maximum  size  is  4  NPS.   2.  During  the  hot  tap  the  shell  material  shall  be  above  the  minimum  design  metal    temperature.   3.  The  nozzle  shall  be  reinforced   4.  During  the  hot  tap,  the  liquid  height  shall  be  limited  so  the  shell  stress  (at  hot    tap  loca>on)  is  not  over  7000  psi.    Formula  to  determine  the  minimum  spacing  between  hot  tap  and  any    adjacent  nozzles:  
  83. 83. Tank  Dismantling   •  Cu[ng  the  Tank   –  Any  Size  Pieces   •  Shell  Cu[ng  Op>ons   –  Shells  <  ½  "  thick  can  be  cut  thru  welds   –  Shells  >  than  ½  ",  Deseam  welds  including  HAZ   HAZ  -­‐  lesser  of  ½  "  weld  width  or  1/4“   –  Cut  at  least  6"from  welds   •  BoAom  Cu[ng  Op>ons   –  Deseam  welds   –  Cut  at  least  2  "  away  from  welds   •  Roof  Cu[ng  Op>ons   –  Same  as  Floor   •  Shell-­‐to-­‐BoAont  Weld   –  Various  Op>ons  
  84. 84. Tank  Dismantling   Shell  to  BoAom  Weld  Op>ons   1.  Cut  at  "A-­‐A  "  &  "B-­‐B  "  if  reusing  the  boAom  and  not  reusing  the  shell-­‐to-­‐   boAom  weld   2.  Cut  at  "C-­‐C"  if  reusing  the  boAom-­‐to-­‐shell  weld.   3.  Cut  at  "B-­‐B"  if  reusing  an  annular  ring,  or  not  reusing  the  boAom             Iden>fying  Pieces  -­‐  Without  ID  this  is  a  problem   1.  Shell,  boAom  &  roof  plates  should  be  marked  before  cu[ng.   2.  A  drawing  showing  piece  iden>fica>on  is  helpful.   3.  For  shell  plates  use  2  sets  of  match  marks  at  boAom  &  top  edges  
  85. 85. Reconstruc3on  -­‐  Welding   •  Weld  Spacing    Don't  align  shell  ver>cal  welds  with  boAom  welds    Spacing  of  welds  per  Figure  9-­‐1     •  Temperature  Limits  when  Welding    If,  Temp  <  0  °F,  then  NO  Welding    If,  0°F<  Temp  <  32  °F,  then  warm  base  metal  to  140  °F  (hand  warm)    If,  Temp  >  32  °F,  then  Weld     •  Other  Climate  Condi>ons    If  wet,  then  NO  Welding    If  raining  or  snowing  on  surface,  then  NO  Welding    If  high  winds,  then  NO  Welding  (unless  Shielded)  
  86. 86. Reconstruc3on  -­‐  Welding   •  Thickness  Limits    If,  t>l",  then  warm  base  to  140  °F.    If,t>  1-­‐1/2",  then  preheat  to  200  °F.     •  Underculng  Limits    Ver>cal  Welds  1/64"    Horizontal  Welds  1/32“     •  Bo3om  Welding  Sequence    Weld  shell-­‐to-­‐boAom  joint  first    Sequence  of  floor  welding  to  prevent  distor>on  
  87. 87. Reconstruc3on  -­‐  Welding   •  Tack  Welds    Remove  all  ver>cal  tacks  if  joint  weld  is  a  manual  process.    All  tacks  to  be  made  with  a  qualified  procedure.    All  tacks  le|  in,  must  be  made  by  qualified  welder.   •  Low  Hydrogen  Electrode    All  manual  welds  for  Group  I-­‐III  materials  if  t  >  1/2"    All  manual  welds  for  Group  IV  -­‐  VI  material  welds   •  Misalignment  tolerances  -­‐  See  below   •  Reinforcement  Limits  -­‐  Table  10-­‐1    Limits  of  misalignment  and  Over  projec>on   Plate  Thickness   Ver:cal  Welds   Horizontal  Welds   t  <  5/16"   1/16"   1/16"   t<5/8"   1/16"   0.2t   t>5/8"   Lesser  of:  O.lt  or   1/8”   1/8”  
  88. 88. Welding  Misc.   •  ASMESectlX    WPS  qualifica>on    Welders  qualifica>on   •  Weldability  of  steel  shall  be  verified    Known  material  that  is  weldable    Test  coupon  for  PQR  taken  from  actual  plate   •  Weld  Iden>fica>on    Each  welder  assigned  iden>fica>on  mark    Welder  stamps  adjacent  to  the  weld,  every  3  feet.    Or  use  a  weld  map    No  ID  required    Roof  plate  welds    Flange-­‐to-­‐nozzle-­‐neck  welds  
  89. 89. NDE  General   •  Procedures:  ASME  SecGon  V   •  Acceptance  Criteria:  ASME  SecGon  Via   •  Personnel    RT&  UT  -­‐  ASNT,  SNT-­‐TC-­‐1A    MT&PT    Competent  in  technique  used    Vision  -­‐  Jaeger  2,  contrast  colors,  annual  exam     Note!!!  API  Sec>on  12  lists  NDE  methods  by  field  ac>vity  (grinding,  hot  tap,    new  plate,  etc.)  Appendix  F  lists  all  field  ac>vi>es  by  NDE  method  (UT,  RT,    etc.)  When  studying  which  NDE  methods  are  applicable,  it  is  probably    easier  to  memorize  using  Appendix  F  
  90. 90. MT  &  PT  Methods   •  Cavi>es  from  grinding  and  gouging    Nozzle  fillet  welds;    nozzle-­‐to-­‐shell    shell-­‐to-­‐repad    repad-­‐to-­‐nozzle   •  Complete  welds  of  stress  relieved  assemblies,  a|er  stress  relief   •  AAachment  welds  to  Group  IV-­‐VI  materials  Shellplates  thicker  than   1"  (root  &  final)  1     See  Appendix  F  for  other  NDE  methods  
  91. 91. Tank  Bo>oms   •  New  Shell-­‐to-­‐Bo3om  Welds    1st  weld  pass  -­‐  light  diesel  oil  (4  hour  min.)    Complete  welds      Right-­‐angle  vacuum  box      Light  diesel  oil      Air  test  (ISpsi)  space  between  the  both  fillets     •  New  Bo3om  Welds    Vacuum  Box    Tracer  Gas    Reverse  Hydro  
  92. 92. NDE  -­‐  Radiography   •  Follow  API  650  PLUS:   New  plate-­‐to-­‐new  plate:  no  addiGon  required   New  plate-­‐to-­‐exisGng  plate    Verts  -­‐  one  RTon  each  vert    Horizontals  •  one  RT  each  50'    Intersec>ons  -­‐  RT  all   •  New  welds  in  reconstrucGon    25%  of  intersec>ons  of  new-­‐to-­‐old  welds   •  Replacement  insert  plates    Circular-­‐I  RT    Rectangular-­‐  6RT(1  vert,  1  horizontal,  4  corners)  &  all  intersec>ons  between   new-­‐to-­‐old  welds    If  over  1"thick  -­‐100%    Inserts  for  new  Nozzles  -­‐  100%   Other  RT  Data  
  93. 93. 1.  Minimum  diagnos>c  length  ofRT:  6"   2.  Exis>ng  welds  evaluated  per  construc>on  std.   3.  Repair  work  marked  with  "R  ".  "Repair  work"  are  welds  that  had  a  weld    defect  and  were  repaired.  This  "repair  "  does  not  mean  a  welding    associated  with  a  tank  "repair  ".  Are  you  confused?   4.  The  film  should  iden>fy  the  welder.  Or  a  weld  may  can  be  used.  
  94. 94. Hydrosta3c  Tes3ng   •  A  hydrotest  is  required  for  all:    Reconstructed  Tanks  (never  exempted)    Tanks  with  Major  Repairs  &  Altera>ons  (unless  exempted)   •  Held  for  24  hours   •  Hydrotest  Exemp>ons    Engineer  review,  and  Tank  owner  authorizes  (in  wri>ng),  and  Meet  API's    specific  requirements  for  the  component  Or,  a  fitness-­‐for-­‐service  evalua>on    supports  exemp>on    
  95. 95. Defini>on  Major  Repair  &  AlteraGon:  Not  clearly  defined,  but  includes  all  the    following:   1.  Shell  nozzles  greater  than  12  NPS  (in  liquid  por>on  of  tank).   2.  BoAom  penetra>on  within  12  inches  of  the  shell.   3.  Removal/replacement  of  a  shell  plate  beneath  design  liquid  level.   4.  Removal/replacement  of  an  annular  plate  with  a  dimension  exceeding  12".   5.  Removal/replacement  of  over  12  "  of  a  shell  ver>cal  weld.   6.  Removal/replacement  of  over  12  "  of  a  annular  plate  radial  weld.   7.  Installa>on  of  a  new  boAom  if  the  new  boAom  includes:  an  annular  plate,    or  welding  to  an  exis>ng  boAom  in    the  cri>cal  zone.   8.  Removal/replacement  of  any  part  of  the  shell-­‐to-­‐boAom  weld.   9.  Jacking  (leveling)  a  tank  shell  
  96. 96. Hydrosta3c  Tes3ng   •  Perform  Se3lement  Survey    Before,  during,  and  a|er  filling    Acceptance  criteria  -­‐  API  653  Appendix  B     •  Number  of  Survey  points    N  =  D/l  0  (maximum  spacing  32')  
  97. 97. Marking  &  Recordkeeping   •  Major  Types  of  Records  (6.8)    Construc>on  Records    Inspec>on  Records    Repair  &  Altera>on  Records   •  Specific  Records  -­‐  Repair,  ReconstrucGon    Calcula>ons    Drawings    Inspec>on  &  NDE    Radiographs  (retained  I  year)      -­‐  Etc.  
  98. 98. Reconstruc3on  Records   •  AddiGonal  Nameplate    AAach  next  to  exis>ng    5/32"  leAers  (minimum)    Common  Sense  Data  -­‐  Tank  #,  Material,  Year,  "G",  "H",  etc.   •  Two  CerGficaGons    Reconstruc>on  was  designed  to  API  653    Tank  was  Reconstructed  to  API  653     Defini>on   CerGficaGon:  A  form  must  be  signed  by  someone  represen>ng  the   appropriate    company  or  organiza>on.  
  99. 99. Cathodic  ProtecGon  &  Linings   API  651  -­‐  CPfor  Tanks  API  652  -­‐   Linings  for  Tank  Bo3oms  
  100. 100. CP  Objec3ves   •  At  the  end  of  this  module  you  should:  Know  how  a  corrosion  cell  works   •  Know  how  Cathodic  Protec>on  Systems  func>on   •  Understand  advantages  &  disadvantages  of  Cathodic  Protec>on  (CP)   Systems   •  Know  opera>onal  &  inspec>on  requirements  of  CP  Systems     Purpose  of  API  651:   •  Present  procedures  and  prac>ces  for  achieving  effec>ve  corrosion  control   to  exis>ng  and  new  storage  tank  boAoms  through  the  use  of  cathodic   protec>on.  
  101. 101. Corrosion  Cell   •  Component  of  a  Corrosion  Cell    Anode    Cathode    Metallic  path  -­‐  connects  anode  &  cathode    Electrolyte           •  Defini>ons:   •  Anode  -­‐  the  electrode  at  which  oxida>on  (corrosion)  occurs.   •  Remember:  "A  Node  Corrodes!"   •  Cathode  -­‐  the  electrode  at  which  a  reduc>on  reac>on  occurs.  No  corrosion    occurs  at  this  spot.  The  anode  protects  the  cathode.   •  Metallic  Path  -­‐  connects  the  anode  and  the  cathode.   •  Electrolyte  -­‐for  tanks,  this  is  the  soil  or  liquid  adjacent  to  and  in  contact  with    the  boAom  of  an  aboveground  tank.  It  contains  both  nega>vely  charged  ions    and  posi>vely  charged  ions.  
  102. 102. Corrosion  Cell  is  an  Electrical  Circuit  
  103. 103. Corrosion  Cell   •  Dissimilar  materials  -­‐  See  Galvanic  Series  Differences  between:  weld,   HAZ,  plate   •  Different  oxygen  concentraGons  -­‐  clay  and  debris   •  Soil  characterisGcs  -­‐  moisture,  ph,  etc.    
  104. 104. Cathodic  Protec3on  (CP)   •  CP  provides  an  anode  thus  protecGng  the  anode  -­‐  the  tank  bo3om     •  Two  Types    Galvanic  (sacrificial  anode)    Impressed  current  
  105. 105. Galvanic  CP   Anodes  are  placed  around  or  under  tank   Anodes  are  usually  magnesium  or  zinc   A  weak  ba3ery,  so  limited  current  flow             Advantages:   •  No  external  power  supply  required  Easy  to  install   •  Low  cost  for  small  diameter  tanks  Rarely  have  problems  with  stray   currents  Less  frequent  monitoring  required   Disadvantages:   •  Limited  driving  poten>al,  low  current  output  Limited  to  low-­‐resis>vity  soils   Imprac>cal  for  large  tanks  Difficult  to  protect  center  of  tank  
  106. 106. Impressed  Current  CP   •  Electrical  current  supplied  from  A.C.  source   •  Rec>fier  changes  A.C.  to  D.C.  current   •  Power  can  be  adjusted  to  increase  current  flow   •  Anodes  can  be  place  very  deep  so  current  covers  center  of  tank       Advantages:   Large  driving  poten>al  available  Large  structure  can  be  protected  Output    current  can  be  varied  Can  be  used  with  almost  any  soil  resis>vity   Disadvantages:   •  Can  have  problems  with  stray  currents   •  Power  outage  causes  loss  of  protec>on   •  Higher  maintenance  and  opera>ng  costs   •  Higher  installa>on  cost   •  Safety  issues  regarding  the  use  of  an  external  power  source  in  the  area   •  More  frequent  monitoring  required  
  107. 107. Opera3onal  Issues   •  Stray  currents   •  Desired  current  density  is  1-­‐2  milliamps/|2   •  Desired  poten>al  (voltage)  of  at  least  850  m  V   •  If  leads  are  reversed  the  tank  boAom  becomes  the  anode   •  Polariza>on  may  take  months  to  achieve  once  system  is  ac>vated  
  108. 108. Inspec3on  Issues   •  Impressed  Current  System  -­‐  Quick  Check    Every  2  months    System  is  opera>onal  &  func>oning,  e.g.  the  lights  are  on   •  Impressed  Current  System  -­‐  Thorough  Check    Annually    A  thorough  electrical  check  of  equipment   •  Cathodic  Protec>on  Survey    Annually    Check  poten>al  (voltage)  between  tank  and  soil,  etc  
  109. 109. Linings  Objec3ves   At  the  end  of  this  module  you  should:   •  Know  the  types  of  Lining  Systems   •  Understand  advantages  &  disadvantages  of  Lining  Systems   •  Know  the  installaGon  requirements  of  Lining  Systems   •  Know  the  inspecGon  requirements  of  new  Lining  Systems     Purpose  of  API  652:   •  Present  prac>ces  for  achieving  effec>ve  corrosion  control  to  exis>ng  and   new  storage  tank  boAoms  by  applica>on  of  boAom  linings.  Serves  only  as   a  guide.  
  110. 110. Corrosion  Mechanics   •  Chemical  corrosion   •  Concentra>on  cell  corrosion    Occurs  when  a  surface  deposit,  mill  scale,  or  crevice  creates  a  localized    area  of  lower  oxygen   •  Galvanic  cell  corrosion   •  Cathode  and  Anode  Corrosion  caused  by  sulfate-­‐reducing  bacteria   •  Colonies  of  bacteria   •  Erosion  corrosion    Highly  localized  metal  loss  Abrasive  par>cles  
  111. 111. Thin-­‐Film  Lining   •  20  mils  or  less  in  thickness   •  Apply  2-­‐3  coats  for  thin-­‐film  systems   •  Less  expensive  than  thick-­‐film  linings    Easier  to  apply  than  thick-­‐film  linings   •  O€en  applied  to  new  bo3oms     Disadvantages:  Difficult  to  apply  to  corroded  boAoms  or  uneven  surfaces  
  112. 112. Thick-­‐Film  Lining   •  Greater  than  20  mils  in  thickness  v  Apply  1-­‐4  coats  for  thick-­‐film  systems   •  35-­‐55  mil  thick  linings  should  be  used  for  tank  where  only  internal   corrosion  is  expected   •  80-­‐120  mil  thick  linings  should  be  used  for  tanks  where  internal  and   external  corrosion  is  expected   •  Less  suscep>ble  to  mechanical  damage   •  Not  as  sensi>ve  to  pi[ng  or  surface  irregulari>es  during  installa>on     Disadvantages:   •  More  difficult  to  inspect  the  steel  boAom  a|er  applica>on  More  expensive   than  thin-­‐film  Harder  to  install  than  thin-­‐film  More  prone  to  cracking  
  113. 113. Lining  Installa3on   •  Surface  prepara>on  is  the  most  cri>cal  part  of  the  lining  opera>on   •  Abrasive  blas>ng  should  extend  several  inches  beyond  the  area  to  be   coated   •  All  sharp  edges  and  protrusions  should  be  ground  smooth   •  Abrasive  blas>ng  should  not  be  performed  when  the  steel  surface   temperature  is  less  than  5°F  above  the  dew  point  or  if  the  rela>ve   humidity  is  greater  than  80%  
  114. 114. Lining  Installa3on   •  Surface  roughness  required  is  1.5-­‐4  mils   •  and  increases  with  the  thickness  of  the  lining   •  Surface  finish  must  "white"  or  "near-­‐white“   •  abrasive  blast  cleaned   •  Coa>ng  should  be  installed  when  the  temperature  is  at  least  5°F  above  the   dew  point  and  the  rela>ve  humidity  be  below  than  80%  
  115. 115. Inspec3on   •  All  inspectors  should  be  NACE  cer>fied  or  persons  who  have  demonstrated   a  thorough  knowledge  of  coa>ng  and  lining  prac>ces   •  Follow  inspec>on  procedures  of  NACE  RP0288   •  Take  wet  film  thickness  measurement   •  Take  dry  film  thickness  measurement   •  Determine  the  coa>ng  hardness  using  the  appropriate  procedures   •  "Holiday  "  test  linings    Thick-­‐film  -­‐  high  voltage  detector    Thin-­‐film  -­‐  low  voltage  detector  
  116. 116. ASME  B  &  PV  Sec3on  V  
  117. 117. Module  Objec3ves   •  At  the  end  of  this  module  you  should  know:   •  The  purpose  of  Sec>on  V   •  How  Sec>on  V  is  organized   •  Specific  NDE  Terms   •  Know  how  to  quickly  find  exam  answers  in    Ar>cle  2  -­‐  "RT“    Ar>cle  6  -­‐  "PT"    Ar>cle  7  -­‐  "MT"    Ar>cle  23  -­‐  797  "UT"  
  118. 118. The  Codes  Purpose   •  Sec>on  V  sets  requirements  to  assure  that  a    "quality"  NDE  examina>on  is  conducted    Guidance  on  NDE  method    Limits  placed  on  NDE  method    Acceptance  Criteria  for  EvaluaGng  NDE    Exam    DocumentaGon  requirements   •  It  does  not  establish:    The  Acceptance  Criteria  for  a  weld  or    component    Qualifica>ons  for  the  those  performing  the  NDE    Examina>on  
  119. 119. Organiza3on  of  Code   •  Two  major  Subsec>ons    SubsecGon  A:  Provides  guidance  for  each  Method    SubsecGon  B:  Non  mandatory  pracGces     •  Subsec>on  A  -­‐  NDE  Ar>cles    Scope  &  General    Equipment    CalibraGon    ExaminaGon    EvaluaGon    DocumentaGon  
  120. 120. Ar3cle  2  -­‐  Radiography   Our  focus  will  primarily  be  on  Radiography.  There  a  number  of  concepts  you    need  to  know:   •  Basic  R  T  Principles   •  Examina>on  technique  (single  or  double  wall)   •  Viewing  mode  (single  or  double  wall)   •  Selec>on,  Placement  &  Evalua>on  of  the  IQl   •  BackscaAer  Preven>on  &  Evalua>ons   •  Film  Density  Evalua>ons   •  Film  Iden>fica>on   •  Geometric  Unsharpness  
  121. 121. Radiography  RT   •  Principles  of  RadiaGon    Radia>on  penetrates  maAer    Radia>on  that  strikes  film,  exposes  the  film    When  developed,  the  more  "exposed",  the  darker  the  film    "Mass  "  of  object  absorbs  or  reflects  some  of  the  radia>on.    Factors  of  Mass    Thickness    Material  Density                        Gamma  Rays  or  X  rays      Developed  RT  film  
  122. 122. How  Radiography  Works   1.  The  film  becomes  exposed  when  RTrays  (gamma  rays)  strike  the  film.   2.  The  more  exposed  the  film,  the  darker  the  image  appears  on  the  film.   3.  The  "mass  "  of  the  component  determines  how  much  radia>on  "gets    through  "  the  component.   4.  As  the  "mass  "  increases,  fewer  rays  get  through.  The  radia>on  is  absorbed    or  reflected2.   5.  The  "mass  "  of  a  component,  is  based  on  the  density  and  the  thickness  of    the  component.    So  the  thinner  the  component,  more  rays  expose  the  film,    and  the  image  on  the  RTis  darker  
  123. 123. RT  Setup  Technique   •  Single-­‐wall  Technique    Radia3on  only  passes  through  1  wall  (T-­‐271.1)    This  is  a  preferred  method  (T-­‐271)    Must  have  access  to  both  sides  of  the  part    With  a  single  exposure,  can  RT  with  a  single  film  or  with  mul3ple    film  -­‐  a  'panoramic  “   •  Double-­‐wall  Technique    Radia3on  passes  through  2  walls  (T-­‐271.2)    Used  only  when  access  is  not  available  to  both  sides  of  the  part  
  124. 124. RT  Setup  Teqncique   •  DWTech  -­‐  Single  Wall  Viewing   Source  is  placed  on  one  side  of  pipe,  and  the  film  is   wrapped  around  other   "Blow  away  "  the  wall  where  the  source  is  placed   A  minimum  of  3  exposures  -­‐120  degrees  apart     •  DW  Tech  -­‐  Double  Wall  Viewing   "Ellip>cal  shot"  which  is  similar  to  a  "Profile  RT"   Source  is  placed  away  from  pipe,  and  film  is  le|  flat.   Only  for  outside  diameters  <  3-­‐1/2  "   Requires  2  exposures  90  degrees  offset  
  125. 125. Penetrameters  -­‐  IQIs   •  The  funcGon  of  the  Penetrameter    It's  how  the  sensi>vity  ofRT  is  validated    If  the  "essen>al"  hole/wire  can  be  seen,  then  any  discon>nuity  the  same    size    or  greater  should  be  visible  in  the  RT   •  Penetrameter  Types  (T-­‐233)    Hole-­‐type  -­‐  small  plate  with  3  holes  (Table  T-­‐233.1)    Wire-­‐type  -­‐  plas>c  holder  with  6  sized  wires  (Table  T-­‐233.2)  
  126. 126. IQIs  Size  &  Number   •  Penetrameter  Size    Use  Table  T-­‐276  to  select  IQI    Watch  out-­‐-­‐-­‐    Source  side  vs.  Film  side    Hole  Type  vs.  Wire  type     •  Number  of  Penetrameters    (T-­‐277.2)    one  per  film,  except...    for  panoramic  shots  –    3  IQI's  placed  120    degrees  apart  
  127. 127. Back  Sca>er   •  Backsca3er  definiGon    Radia>on  bounces  off  an  obstruc>on  and  strikes  the  back-­‐side  of  the  film.    (Yes  this  exposes  the  film!)    BackscaAer  will  decrease  the  RT  quality     •  How  to  handle  (T-­‐223)    If  in  a  congested  area,  most  techs  place  a  lead  screen  on  the  back  of  the    film  to  prevent  backscaAer    Place  a  lead  leAer  "B"  on  the  back  of  the  film    A  light  image  of  a  "B"  on  the  RT  indicates    backscaAer  
  128. 128. RT  Markings   •  RT  IdenGficaGon  -­‐  Each  RT  marked:  (T-­‐224)    Contract    Weld  Number    Manufacturer's  Name  or  Symbol    Date     •  LocaGon  Markings  are  used  to  idenGfy    specific  locaGons  on  a  specific  weld  (T-­‐275)    Marked  on  Weld    Marked  on  Film  
  129. 129. Film  Evalua3on   •  Previously  we  have  focused  on  performing  the  RT  examinaGon,  now  it's   Gme  to  evaluated  the  RTfilm.  The  evaluaGon  includes  reviewing:    Film  density    IQI  (Penetrameter)    BackscaAer    Geometric  Unsharpness    Other   There  are  two  primary  steps  in  performing  Film  Interpreta>on.   1.  Evaluate  the  Film  Quality   2.  Evaluate  the  Weld  (Area  of  Interest)  Quality    This  module  will  cover  the  first  step  -­‐  Film  Quality   Note!  Many  inspectors  miss  this  step.  They  go  directly  to  Step  Two.  But...  if    the  film  quality  does  not  meet  the  acceptance  criteria,  defects  will  be    missed!  
  130. 130. Evalua3on  Film  Density   Film  Density  is  the  darkness  of  the  film,  Density  is  measured  with  either:    Densitometer  (most  accurate  way!)  (T-­‐225)    Calibrated  step  wedge  film  (T-­‐225)    Density  acceptance  standards    For  Gamma  Ray,  IQI  &  Aol  -­‐  2.0  to  4.0  (T-­‐282.1)    Aol  is  within  -­‐15%  to  +30%  of  the  IQI  (T-­‐282.2)   Film  Density  is  the  darkness  of  the  film.  It  is  based  on  how  much  light  passes  through  a  film.    High  film  density  is  dark  and  Low  film  density  is  light   What  is  the  technical  meaning  of  the  density  numbers?    Density          Amount  of  LightPasses  Through  Film    1.0          10%    2.0            1%    3.0            0.1%    4.0            0.01%   Why  are  there  density  lmits?   1)  Film  too  dark  or  too  light  can  miss  defects?   2)  Since  the  IQI  is  used  to  determine  the  sensi>vity  of  the  RT,  the  density  of  the  IQI  and    weld  should  be  similar!  
  131. 131. Evalua3on  IQI   •  Check  IQI  Placement    Hole-­‐type  IQI  -­‐  adjacent  to  weld  or  across  the  weld    Wire-­‐type  IQI  -­‐  perpendicular  across  the  weld     •  Acceptance  Standards    Correct  IQI  used  (Table  T-­‐276)    Hole-­‐type  IQIMust    see  2T  hole  (T-­‐283  &  Table  T-­‐276)    If  shim  is  used,  must  see  3  edges  of  IQI  (T-­‐277.3)    Wire-­‐type  IQI  -­‐  Must  see  designated  wire  (T-­‐283)    Lead  leAer  "F"  used  for  film  side  IQIs  
  132. 132. Evalua3on  of  Backsca>er   •  Backsca3er  definiGon    Radia>on  bounces  off  of  obstruc>ons  and  strikes  the  back-­‐side  of  the  film.    (Yes  this  exposes  the  film!)    BackscaAer  will  decrease  the  RT  quality     •  Backsca3er's  acceptance  standard  a-­‐284)    Rejectable  film  -­‐  A  light  "B  "  appearing  in  a  dark  area    Acceptable  film  -­‐  A  dark  "B  "  appearing  in  a  light  area  
  133. 133. Evalua3on  Geometric  Unsharpness   •  Geometric  Unsharpness  is  the  shadow  that  can  be  seen  around  the  image    edges.   •  Factors  affec>ng  Unsharpness  include:    Diameter  of  the  RT  Source  “F”    Source  to  Object  distance  “D”    Object  to  Film  distance  “d”   •  Unsharpness  is  usually  not  an  issue  with  weld  quality  shots!   •  Acceptance  Criteria  (T-­‐28S)  
  134. 134. Other  NDE  Methods   •  The  other  NDE  Ar>cles  are  organized  similarly  to  RT.    Equipment...  Calibra>on  ...  Examina>on  ...  Evalua>on    Documenta>on.  Most  of  the  terms  will  be  familiar.   •  Ultrasonics  -­‐  ArGcle  23  (SE-­‐797)   •  Liquid  Penetrant  -­‐  ArGcle  6   •  MagneGc  ParGcle  -­‐  ArGcle  7  
  135. 135. Quality  Welds   ASME  B  &  PV  Sec3on  IX  
  136. 136. Module  Objec3ves   •  At  the  end  of  this  module  you  should  know:    The  purpose  of  SecGon  IX    How  SecGon  IX  is  organized    Specific  SecGon  IX  terms;  posiGons,  SMTS,    How  to  evaluate  a  WPQ;  welder's  papers    How  to  evaluate  a  WPS/PQR;  weld  procedure     •  WPQ  -­‐  Welder  Performance  Qualifica>on   •  WPS  -­‐  Weld  Procedure  Specifica>on   •  PQR  -­‐  Procedure  Qualifica>on  Record     •  "Two  "P's"  with  a  Electrode/Rod"    Performance  -­‐  Welder  Skill    Procedure  –ProperGes  of  Weldment  
  137. 137. Sec3on  IX  Qualifica3on   During  qualifica>on  tes>ng  (either  welder  or  procedure),  a  test  weld  is    conducted.  Sec>on  IX  specifies:   •  Specific  Variables  included  in  the  test  weld    Welder  Qualifica>on  -­‐  Skill  issues  (Mtls,  thickness,  posi>on,  etc.)    Procedure  Qualifica>on  -­‐  Metallurgical  issues  (Mtls,  PWHT,  etc.)   •  Specific  Examina>ons  conducted  on  the  completed  test  weld    Examina>ons  for  Welder  vs.  Procedure  -­‐  Different  examina>ons    Type  of  Exams  -­‐  Tension  Test,  Bend  Test,  RT  &  Visual   •  The  Acceptance  Criteria  for  examina>ons   •  The  Limits  Qualified  -­‐  Based  on  the  test  weld  variables    Passing  a  qualifica>on  test  does  NOT  qualify  a  welder  or  procedure  for  all    Produc>on  welds.    E.g.  Welder's  test  coupon  -­‐  Flat  Posi>on.  If  the  test  weld  passes  the  exams,    the  welder  is  only  qualified  for  Flat  produc>on  welds.  
  138. 138. Test  Posis3ons   Test  PosiGons  are  used  during  the  Welder's  Qualifica>on  tes>ng.  The  test  posi>on    is  indicated  by  a  designa>on  like  the  3-­‐G  posi>on.  Produc>on  welds  are  NOT    designated  by  this  numbering  system.    Component  -­‐  either  Plate  or  Pipe    Orienta>on  (I,  2,3,4...)      From  simple  to  complex,  e.g.  "1"  is  a  Flat  orienta>on    Groove  (G)  or  Fillet  (F)   Welder  Illustrates  the  PosiGons  "Ahh,,Ahh2,Ahh3,andAhh  4                 See  QW-­‐461.5  for  an  illustra>on  of  the  different  posi>ons  

×