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www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
START HERE
Six Steps to Building a
Content Strategy
presented by:
Erin Edgerton Norvell
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Included in this Presentation:
01
Content
Strategy 101
02
Components
of a Content
Strategy
03
Six...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
What is a Content Strategy?
An effective content strategy:
•Defines how you’re going to use conte...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Content Marketing vs.
Content Strategy
Many organizations are turning to the creation and deliver...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
When You Need a Content Strategy
Content
Process
Access
Resources
Are you creating content and pu...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Your Content’s Maturity Determines
the Focus of Your Strategy
PHASE 01: PILOTING
If you’re in a t...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Elements of a Content Strategy
Substance—What
kind of content do
you need? What
messages will you...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Six Steps to Developing
a Content Strategy
Define
Your
Content’s
Substance
Conduct
Internal &
Ext...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Step 1: Conduct an Audit
Tip: If resources are limited, use your content management system to pul...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Content Types
When mapping existing content, assign each piece a content type.
Some common conten...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Step 2: Conduct Internal and
External Analyses
Assessment of Current State
Business Needs
User Pe...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Step 3: Create Your Core Strategy
A core strategy (also known as a “content marketing mission sta...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Step 4: Define Your
Content’s Substance
Your content needs to provide value to your
target audien...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Find Your Brand Voice
To build an emotional connection with your audience, your brand needs a
cle...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Step 5: Structure Your Content
for Success
“The more structured content is,
the more findable it ...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Step 6: Develop Workflows and
Governance
03
02
01
05
04
Editorial
Style Guide
Internal Tools
& Re...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Gathering Internal Support
To succeed, your internal buy-in and support is important at all level...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Deciding When to Outsource
Consider your needs and resources when deciding who your organization’...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
So You Want to Hire a Content
Strategist…
A dedicated Content Strategist leads the development of...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
R E S O U R C E S
www.digitaledgecommunications.us
Books
•Halvorson, Kristina and Melissa Rach. C...
www.rawoonpowerpoint.com
Thank You!
www.digitaledgecommunications.us
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Six Steps to Building a Content Strategy

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Wondering if your content is effective? Struggling to coordinate content across various teams in your organization? If so, a content strategy may be the right tool for you. This presentation covers the basics of building a content strategy and provides resources for additional information and templates.

For more from Digital Edge Communications, visit our website: www.digitaledgecommunications.us

Published in: Marketing

Six Steps to Building a Content Strategy

  1. 1. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com START HERE Six Steps to Building a Content Strategy presented by: Erin Edgerton Norvell
  2. 2. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Included in this Presentation: 01 Content Strategy 101 02 Components of a Content Strategy 03 Six Steps to Building an Effective Strategy 04 Maintaining & Growing Your Content Strategy 05 Resources & Templates www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  3. 3. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com What is a Content Strategy? An effective content strategy: •Defines how you’re going to use content to meet your business’ goals and audiences’ needs •Guides decisions about content through its complete lifecycle (discovery to deletion) •Sets benchmarks against which to measure the success of your content “A content strategy guides your plans for the creation, delivery, and governance of content.” creation governance delivery Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  4. 4. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Content Marketing vs. Content Strategy Many organizations are turning to the creation and delivery of high-value content in place of traditional advertising (i.e. “content marketing”). But producing large quantities of content can be counterproductive when not aligned with your content strategy. An influx of content can: • Overwhelm your audience • Limit your ability to tailor message to your target audience • Bury your top tasks, making it difficult for users to do what they came to do • Complicate maintenance activities aimed at keeping the site current and timely Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  5. 5. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com When You Need a Content Strategy Content Process Access Resources Are you creating content and publishing it to a single webpage? Does your content represent a collection of unrelated projects? Is the majority of your content written for the “general public”? If you’re producing content but not getting the results you want, consider these questions: Are various teams creating content independently? Do you lack clear measures to evaluate your content? Are you concerned that your users can’t access your content across multiple devices? Are you wiling to commit time and resources to aligning our content with your business’ goals and audiences’ needs? If you answered “yes,” a content strategy is the right tool for you. Source: Launch Your Own Content Marketing Program (Content Marketing Institute) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  6. 6. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Your Content’s Maturity Determines the Focus of Your Strategy PHASE 01: PILOTING If you’re in a trial period of creating new content or testing new communication channels, your strategy should help you define your target audiences and align content creation with their needs. PHASE 04: THRIVING If you’re using your evaluation data to inform program enhancements and adapting content to rapidly respond to emerging issues, your strategy should help you determine where to focus resources for expansion and innovation activities. PHASE 02: SCALING If you’re expanding your pilot phase to ongoing activities or additional channels, your strategy should help you develop routine processes for content creation, dissemination, and evaluation. PHASE 03: SUSTAINING If you’re working from an agreed- upon content strategy, focusing on scaling content activities, and evaluating how your content is performing, your strategy should help you look for process improvements and efficiencies. Piloting Phase Sustaining Phase Thriving Phase Scaling Phase Source: Content Science The Value of Content to Marketing (whitepaper) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  7. 7. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Elements of a Content Strategy Substance—What kind of content do you need? What messages will you use to communicate with your audience? Structure—How is your content prioritized, organized, formatted, and displayed? Workflow—What processes, tools, and resources are required to disseminate your content successfully and maintain a high level of quality over time? Governance—How are key decisions about your content and content strategy made? How are changes initiated and communicated? Source: Brain Traffic www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  8. 8. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Six Steps to Developing a Content Strategy Define Your Content’s Substance Conduct Internal & External Analyses Structure Your Content for Success Create Your Core Strategy Develop Workflows & Governance Conduct an Audit 1 65432 Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  9. 9. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Step 1: Conduct an Audit Tip: If resources are limited, use your content management system to pull an inventory of pages or, for qualitative assessments, analyze a representative sample. Unless you’re launching a brand new program, you already have content online. The first step in developing a strategy is understanding your existing content by conducting a audit. There are three types of audits: Qualitative Best Practices Assessment Quantitative Inventory Qualitative Strategic Assessment complete list of your content, including its magnitude and complexity comparison of your content against industry standards comparison of your goals and current content state Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  10. 10. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Content Types When mapping existing content, assign each piece a content type. Some common content types include: • Podcasts • Press releases • Products • Reviews • Testimonials • Tips and lists • Tutorials Source: Content Everywhere (Halvorson) • Bios • Blog posts • Business listings • Episodes • Event listings • Fact sheets • FAQs • Feature articles • Help/user assistance modules Source: Content Everywhere (Wachter-Boettcher) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  11. 11. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Step 2: Conduct Internal and External Analyses Assessment of Current State Business Needs User Personas Messaging Strategy Media Mix Clearance Processes Evaluation Planning Next, conduct and document an external analysis that contains the following: •User data on your target audience(s) needs and how your content meets those needs •User personas for each target audience; map the intersection between each audience’s needs and your internal business goals •Assessment of your competitors’ activities and how their offerings compare to your content •Partnership tactics that include building relationships with thought leaders, peer influencers, and/or brand advocates Conduct and document an internal analysis that contains the following: • Cleary stated current business needs • Target audiences (in priority order) • Key messaging and/or calls to action for each target audience • Purpose of each of your current communication channels and a map of how they are interconnected • Agreed-upon governance and workflows for content creation, maintenance and evaluation Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  12. 12. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Step 3: Create Your Core Strategy A core strategy (also known as a “content marketing mission statement”) is forward-looking, aspirational, and answers these questions: •What does your strategy need to accomplish? •What content will we produce for our users? •What will the organization need to do to support the content? Content 01 Example: Whether it’s a delicious recipe, an inspiring décor idea or a refreshing approach to organizing, we strive to help you [Moms] create a home that’s truly your own. Everything we do here is designed to empower and inspire you to make your home even better, and most importantly, a place you love to be. - HomeMadeSimple Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) 3 www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  13. 13. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Step 4: Define Your Content’s Substance Your content needs to provide value to your target audience and meet their specific needs. For each audience: •Identify your primary communication channels •Determine the high-value content you should offer (a balance between business and users’ needs) •Define clear and relevant calls to action for each channel, webpage, or content type •Document the tailoring strategies (e.g. message framing, tone, language, use of multimedia) Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  14. 14. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Find Your Brand Voice To build an emotional connection with your audience, your brand needs a clear and consistent voice. Consider these four attributes to find your voice: Tip: Once tailored with your information, print this graphic for each content creator in your organization to help maintain brand consistency. Source: Social Media Explorer www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  15. 15. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Step 5: Structure Your Content for Success “The more structured content is, the more findable it is.” Whether your users are finding your content via a search engine, accessing your content across various devices and screen sizes, or locating the desired content on a page, effective content is structured content. Follow these prioritization and planning steps: • Determine the priority order for each content piece (per section of content, not per page) • Map various content formats to each of your communication channels • Develop guidelines for how content will be structured for easy scanning and reading (e.g. bold headers, brief paragraphs, bulleted lists) • Develop an search engine optimization (SEO) plan, including specific keywords • Develop a metadata and tagging taxonomy • Test content across multiple devices and address issues for cross-platform dissemination Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  16. 16. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Step 6: Develop Workflows and Governance 03 02 01 05 04 Editorial Style Guide Internal Tools & Resources Internal Content Creation & Clearance Processes Content Automation Processes Schedule & Process for Content Review & Archiving Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) A strategy is only effective if it’s clearly communicated to all parties and consistently implemented. Governance activities include: •Define ownership and roles (e.g. creator, subject matter expert, editor, approver, disseminator) •Design workflows and governance processes for newly created content and content maintenance reviews/updates •Develop and share governance documents •Assign a lead for the ongoing implementation of the content strategy www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  17. 17. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Gathering Internal Support To succeed, your internal buy-in and support is important at all levels. Without, your content is at risk. Team If they prioritize… And neglect to consider… The risks are… Leadership • Budget/ROI • Schedule • Deliverables • User experience • Time needed to produce high quality content • Content doesn’t meet user needs • Missed deadlines Communications • Campaign-driven creative • Digital and social media • Highly interactive features • SEO • Existing content • Maintenance post-launch • CMS restrictions or requirements • Content is more flash than substance • Content is launched then neglected • Content is delivered in ways that can’t be indexed or measured Subject Matter Experts • Scientific accuracy • Ability to measure response • Message tailoring • Audience priorities • Usability • Content contains jargon/lacks plain language • Content doesn’t resonate with target audiences User Experience • Audience needs • Research • Visual design • Current state content analysis • SEO considerations • Strategic business decisions • Business objectives are overlooked • Quality content can’t be completed on time due to lack or source materials or resources Technology • CMS development or requirements • Production workflow • Content creators • Brand and message tailoring • Content published before it’s in a high- value state • Lack of brand consistency Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  18. 18. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Deciding When to Outsource Consider your needs and resources when deciding who your organization’s content creators should be. You Should Outsource if you… You should keep it in-house if you… Want more time to focus on your program Are passionate about, and have time to devote to, content creation Don’t have the resources for dedicated staff Have the resources to hire at least one dedicated staff member Have an unexpected or short-term need Have an ongoing need to content support Have a collaborative spirit Have internal agreement on priority content within your organization Are willing to make a short-term investment Are empowered to make and implement content decisions Can clearly articulate your content needs and goals Have internal agreement on content roles and responsibilities Want external credibility and a fresh, objective perspective Want dedicated, full-time care and feeding for your content Want flexibility and scalability to match your changing content needs Want organizational knowledge and to leverage lessons learned from within the project Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  19. 19. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com So You Want to Hire a Content Strategist… A dedicated Content Strategist leads the development of a content strategy based on business and target audience needs. In addition, for each project he/she will: • Map each project to the content strategy • Gather, audit, and analyze exiting content • Determine overall content requirements and potential content sources • Coordinate content objectives, assumptions, risks and success factors across internal teams • Write or manage the development of all content • Create taxonomies and metadata frameworks • Establish a plan for maintaining and governing content post-launch Source: Content Strategy for the Web (Halvorson & Rach) www.digitaledgecommunications.us
  20. 20. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com R E S O U R C E S www.digitaledgecommunications.us Books •Halvorson, Kristina and Melissa Rach. Content Strategy for the Web (2nd Edition) •Sara Wachter-Boettcher. Content Everywhere •Redish, Ginny. Letting Go of the Words: Writing Web Content that Works (2nd Edition) •Jones, Coleen. Clout: The Art and Science of Influential Web Content Digital Resources •Content Marketing Institute •Brain Traffic blog •Hubspot blog •The Content Strategy Noob blog
  21. 21. www.rawoonpowerpoint.com Thank You! www.digitaledgecommunications.us

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