The Department of Cultural Affairs <ul><li>The DCA’s primary mission is to ensure adequate public funding for non-profit c...
Who Does the DCA Represent and Serve? <ul><li>Nonprofit organizations in the visual, literary and performing arts </li></u...
The Department of Cultural Affairs <ul><li>Three Funding Divisions: </li></ul><ul><li>I. Program Services Unit </li></ul><...
THE PROGRAM SERVICE UNIT <ul><li>Offered through the DCA </li></ul><ul><li>Awards annual grants to more than 660 cultural ...
The Cultural Institutions Unit <ul><li>Serves the 34 CIGs, all of which occupy City-owned property. Funding provided by th...
The Capital Projects Unit <ul><li>Working as the liaison between the cultural organization and the City agencies involved ...
The Department of Cultural Affairs <ul><li>The DCA also offers: </li></ul><ul><li>Federally funded grants for small capita...
The Community Arts Development Program  (CADP) <ul><li>Funds small capital projects at community-based arts organizations ...
The Cultural Development Fund  (CDF) <ul><li>In 2003, DCA created (CDF) to reward excellence through a merit-based funding...
DCA Cultural Infrastructure Investments <ul><li>195 Capital Projects Total </li></ul><ul><li>2008 Projects </li></ul><ul><...
Materials for the Arts  (MFTA) <ul><li>Gathers materials – such as paint, furniture, electronic equipment, and costume tri...
Materials for the Arts, Budget <ul><li>In FY2006, MFTA distributed 75.1 tons of materials valued at $6.6 million to 1,565 ...
Percent for Art <ul><li>This program commissions artists to create permanent public artworks in municipal buildings and sp...
1869 <ul><li>A group of private citizens proposes a unique idea:   </li></ul><ul><li>New York City should construct and ma...
1898 <ul><li>The Art Commission is created, an 11-member panel that reviews permanent works of art, architecture and lands...
1934 <ul><li>Mayor Fiorello La Guardia appoints a Municipal Art Committee to advise City government on ways to stimulate N...
1943 <ul><li>City officials join with a number of prominent New Yorkers to create the City Center of Music and Drama as a ...
1960 <ul><li>Carnegie Hall narrowly escapes demolition when the City purchases it. </li></ul><ul><li>City funds finance th...
1962 <ul><li>Office of Cultural Affairs (OCA) is created by Mayor Robert F. Wagner and Robert W. Dowling to promote and st...
1968 <ul><li>Department of Cultural Affairs created within the Parks Department. </li></ul>
1976 <ul><li>The 15 cultural institutions housed in City owned buildings or on City-owned property that had been receiving...
1978 <ul><li>Angela Fremont helps out the Central Park Zoo by announcing on radio that the Zoo needs a refrigerator to hou...
2006 <ul><li>DCA oversees the largest budget in the agency’s history and relocates to the restored Surrogate’s Court House...
2008 and beyond The NYC budget for Fiscal Year 2008  provides  $167.9 million  in expense funds  to the Department of Cult...
New York City Council <ul><li>51 members </li></ul><ul><li>Districts defined by population geographic boundaries </li></ul...
New York City Council <ul><li>Within the City Council, the   Committee for Cultural Affairs, Libraries & International Int...
New York City Council <ul><li>Committee for Cultural Affairs, Libraries & International Intergroup Relations oversees legi...
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About NYC's Dept of Cultural Affairs

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A presentation about NYC's Department of Cultural Affairs for a 10/17/07 Creative Conversation.

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About NYC's Dept of Cultural Affairs

  1. 1. The Department of Cultural Affairs <ul><li>The DCA’s primary mission is to ensure adequate public funding for non-profit cultural organizations, both large and small, throughout the five boroughs. </li></ul>
  2. 2. Who Does the DCA Represent and Serve? <ul><li>Nonprofit organizations in the visual, literary and performing arts </li></ul><ul><li>Public-oriented sciences and humanities institutions, including zoos, botanical gardens, and historical and preservation societies </li></ul><ul><li>Service organizations providing technical assistance, affordable rehearsal and studio space, and advocacy for nonprofit cultural organizations and individual artists </li></ul><ul><li>Creative artists from all disciplines </li></ul>
  3. 3. The Department of Cultural Affairs <ul><li>Three Funding Divisions: </li></ul><ul><li>I. Program Services Unit </li></ul><ul><li>II. Cultural Institutions Unit </li></ul><ul><li>III. Capital Projects Unit </li></ul>
  4. 4. THE PROGRAM SERVICE UNIT <ul><li>Offered through the DCA </li></ul><ul><li>Awards annual grants to more than 660 cultural organizations throughout the five boroughs for a broad array of activities. </li></ul><ul><li>The 820 groups applying for support in FY 2006 raised, in the aggregate, over $1.7 billion last year </li></ul>
  5. 5. The Cultural Institutions Unit <ul><li>Serves the 34 CIGs, all of which occupy City-owned property. Funding provided by the Unit helps care for the City’s buildings and most often covers a portion of the salaries for their administrative, curatorial, maintenance, and security staff. </li></ul>
  6. 6. The Capital Projects Unit <ul><li>Working as the liaison between the cultural organization and the City agencies involved with the project, the DCA oversees most of the projects it funds from the design and development phase through completion. </li></ul><ul><li>Other City agencies that may be involved in capital projects include: </li></ul><ul><li>The Economic Development Corporation </li></ul><ul><li>The Department of Design and Construction </li></ul><ul><li>The Department of City-wide Administrative Services </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Department of Cultural Affairs <ul><li>The DCA also offers: </li></ul><ul><li>Federally funded grants for small capital projects at cultural organizations in low to moderate-income areas or with low to moderate-income clientele </li></ul>
  8. 8. The Community Arts Development Program (CADP) <ul><li>Funds small capital projects at community-based arts organizations serve low and moderate income populations </li></ul><ul><li>Funded by allocations from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Development Block Grant Program . </li></ul>
  9. 9. The Cultural Development Fund (CDF) <ul><li>In 2003, DCA created (CDF) to reward excellence through a merit-based funding system that expands access to City support and streamlines the timing and process of the funding cycle. </li></ul><ul><li>880 applications in FY2007 </li></ul><ul><li>400 organizations received nearly $2 million </li></ul>
  10. 10. DCA Cultural Infrastructure Investments <ul><li>195 Capital Projects Total </li></ul><ul><li>2008 Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Renovation of the courtyard and lobby at El Museo del Barrio </li></ul><ul><li>Completion of Weeksville Historical Society in Brooklyn </li></ul><ul><li>Façade restoration at the American Museum of Natural History </li></ul><ul><li>2009 Projects </li></ul><ul><li>A new visitor center at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden </li></ul><ul><li>Expansion of the Museum of the City of New York </li></ul><ul><li>A new facility for the New Museum of Contemporary Art </li></ul><ul><li>Expansion of the Museum of Art </li></ul>
  11. 11. Materials for the Arts (MFTA) <ul><li>Gathers materials – such as paint, furniture, electronic equipment, and costume trimmings – from companies and organizations and distributes them free of charge to be transformed into art. </li></ul><ul><li>MFTA is the largest provider of art supplies to New York City’s public schools. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Materials for the Arts, Budget <ul><li>In FY2006, MFTA distributed 75.1 tons of materials valued at $6.6 million to 1,565 cultural nonprofits and public schools. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Percent for Art <ul><li>This program commissions artists to create permanent public artworks in municipal buildings and spaces, such as courthouses, public schools, firehouses, police precincts, parkland, and water treatment facilities </li></ul><ul><li>Since the program’s inception, 225 artists have completed 22 projects </li></ul><ul><li>42 projects are currently underway </li></ul>
  14. 14. 1869 <ul><li>A group of private citizens proposes a unique idea: </li></ul><ul><li>New York City should construct and maintain a building for a museum of natural history, while a private board should build the collections and operate the institution. </li></ul><ul><li>The city’s leadership agrees with the proposition and partners with the private sector to create what is today the American Museum of Natural History . This same model creates The Metropolitan Museum of Art , The Staten Island Institute of Arts and Sciences , The New York Botanical Garden , and the Bronx Zoo . </li></ul>
  15. 15. 1898 <ul><li>The Art Commission is created, an 11-member panel that reviews permanent works of art, architecture and landscape architecture proposed for City-owned property. </li></ul>
  16. 16. 1934 <ul><li>Mayor Fiorello La Guardia appoints a Municipal Art Committee to advise City government on ways to stimulate New York’s cultural life during the hardships of the Great Depression. </li></ul><ul><li>The Committee uses funds from the Works Progress Administration, the Emergency Relief Bureau, and a number of foundations. </li></ul>
  17. 17. 1943 <ul><li>City officials join with a number of prominent New Yorkers to create the City Center of Music and Drama as a municipal theater offering “hundreds of thousands of people...the opportunity of hearing the best [in music and drama] at prices they could afford.” </li></ul><ul><li>The New York City Ballet and the New York City Opera both eventually became constituent organizations of City Center Theater. </li></ul>
  18. 18. 1960 <ul><li>Carnegie Hall narrowly escapes demolition when the City purchases it. </li></ul><ul><li>City funds finance the construction of the Delacorte Theater in Central Park, home to Joseph Papp’s New York Shakespeare Festival, providing free theater performances. </li></ul><ul><li>At this time, the City also initiates program funding in the amount of $60,000. </li></ul>
  19. 19. 1962 <ul><li>Office of Cultural Affairs (OCA) is created by Mayor Robert F. Wagner and Robert W. Dowling to promote and stimulate the cultural life of the City. </li></ul>
  20. 20. 1968 <ul><li>Department of Cultural Affairs created within the Parks Department. </li></ul>
  21. 21. 1976 <ul><li>The 15 cultural institutions housed in City owned buildings or on City-owned property that had been receiving their City support from the Bureau of the Budget, are added to the new agency’s budget. </li></ul><ul><li>These institutions and future City-owned culturals would come to be known as the Cultural Institutions Group (CIGs). </li></ul>
  22. 22. 1978 <ul><li>Angela Fremont helps out the Central Park Zoo by announcing on radio that the Zoo needs a refrigerator to house medicines for the animals. Within minutes, the Zoo’s office is inundated with phone calls, and Materials for the Arts (MFTA) is born. </li></ul>
  23. 23. 2006 <ul><li>DCA oversees the largest budget in the agency’s history and relocates to the restored Surrogate’s Court House, overlooking City Hall Park and Foley Square. </li></ul>
  24. 24. 2008 and beyond The NYC budget for Fiscal Year 2008 provides $167.9 million in expense funds to the Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA)
  25. 25. New York City Council <ul><li>51 members </li></ul><ul><li>Districts defined by population geographic boundaries </li></ul><ul><li>Each councilmember has the ability to serve as a supporter of the arts and culture in their district </li></ul>
  26. 26. New York City Council <ul><li>Within the City Council, the Committee for Cultural Affairs, Libraries & International Intergroup Relations consists of 8 council members plus one chairperson, Councilman Recchia. </li></ul>
  27. 27. New York City Council <ul><li>Committee for Cultural Affairs, Libraries & International Intergroup Relations oversees legislation affecting: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Department of Cultural Affairs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Libraries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Museums </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Art Commission </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New York City Commission for the United Nations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consular Corps and International Business </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mayor's Office of Special Projects and Community Events </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mayor's Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcasting </li></ul></ul>

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