Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Subject: How to give a written
presentation.
Conferences: Oral and poster
communication optimisation and
strategies
Compul...
Professor:
Javier Narciso Romero
University Professor
Contents
1. Written presentations
2. Conferences
1. Written
presentations
STEFAN HELL | NOBEL PRIZE WINNER FOR CHEMISTRY, 2014
"Our welfare state and our quality of life are based on scientific fi...
Expository mode: this is used to convey a
message that the recipient is intended to reflect
upon and analyse.
Characterist...
Your first article.
First, ask these two questions:
Have I read sufficient articles, books, etc.?
Is my research of the sa...
Each journal has a different format (increasingly less so),
and thus the target journal must be selected before starting
t...
Written presentations
I think I have a good article, should I publish it in an open
access journal?
Beware! Only do this if, and only if, it is ...
What do the readers look at?
• Abstract-Conclusions-Figures
• They make the decision whether to read or not!
Other factors...
Written presentations
Parts of an article:
Title: 1 sentence, 1000 readers
Abstract: 4 sentences, 100 readers
Introduction...
Parts of an article:
Title: engaging and short.
Accurately reflects content.
Abstract: concisely defines the problem and t...
Methodology:
• Gives a precise description of the points presented in the introduction, and
expresses the idea before repo...
Results: these show the impact of the results in comparison with
recent studies.
Conclusions: these summarise the most imp...
Written presentations
2. Conferences
Types of conference presentation:
• Plenary speech
• Key note address
• An oral presentation (15-20 minutes)
• A poster (A...
An oral presentation (20 minutes).
A 15 minute talk followed by 5 minutes of questions.
Important aspects:
• Structure the...
Structure of the presentation:
• Introduce the idea/problem (3 minutes)
• Experimental (2 minutes)
• Results and discussio...
Audio-visual aids:
• Transparencies
• Colours
• Font size
• Beware of tics!
Conferences
Needle coke infiltrated with pure copper
Previous Results
•Thermal conductivity
•Thermomechanical testing
Material Characterisation:
Molten
Metal
N2
Gas Exit
Carbon
Preform
Infiltr...
Extreme resistance materials from the space to
fusion
R. Prieto, M. Duarte, N. Rojo,
J.M. Molina, E. Louis and J. Narciso,...
Posters:
• A lot of competition
• Why should people attend my poster?
• Engaging!
• Identification (personal-work)
Confere...
Jornadas
Puertas Abiertas 2011
El Departamento de Química Inorgánica está formado
por una plantilla de unas 80 personas de...
Javier Narciso Romero
narciso@ua.es
University Professor
Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

How to give a written presentation. Conferences: Oral and poster communication optimisation and strategies

464 views

Published on

How to give a written presentation. Conferences: Oral and poster communication optimisation and strategies

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

How to give a written presentation. Conferences: Oral and poster communication optimisation and strategies

  1. 1. Subject: How to give a written presentation. Conferences: Oral and poster communication optimisation and strategies Compulsory cross-disciplinary core courses ACTIVITY 3 > Block 2
  2. 2. Professor: Javier Narciso Romero University Professor
  3. 3. Contents 1. Written presentations 2. Conferences
  4. 4. 1. Written presentations
  5. 5. STEFAN HELL | NOBEL PRIZE WINNER FOR CHEMISTRY, 2014 "Our welfare state and our quality of life are based on scientific findings." The 2014 Nobel Prize winner for chemistry has said that "in a broad sense", human history is the story of scientific discovery. Source: http://elpais.com/elpais/2014/12/08/ciencia/1418063781_807253.html Written presentations
  6. 6. Expository mode: this is used to convey a message that the recipient is intended to reflect upon and analyse. Characteristics: clarity, conciseness, precision, objectivity, accuracy, correct use of language. Written presentations
  7. 7. Your first article. First, ask these two questions: Have I read sufficient articles, books, etc.? Is my research of the same quality as the articles that I consider good? It is necessary to be optimistic and positive, but a reality check is advisable: it is unlikely that any of us is the next Einstein! Written presentations
  8. 8. Each journal has a different format (increasingly less so), and thus the target journal must be selected before starting to write. How do I choose a journal? • Absolute and relative impact index (JCR). • Who is my target audience? • Look at where leaders in the field publish. Written presentations
  9. 9. Written presentations
  10. 10. I think I have a good article, should I publish it in an open access journal? Beware! Only do this if, and only if, it is in the first quartile, otherwise the price will rocket! As a general rule, if the research is relevant it should be sent to the first quartile (JCR). The order is less relevant (Q1): the audience is the determining factor. Nature vs Science Written presentations
  11. 11. What do the readers look at? • Abstract-Conclusions-Figures • They make the decision whether to read or not! Other factors to take into account: • Prestige of the institution • Prestige of the named authors • Journal quality Written presentations
  12. 12. Written presentations Parts of an article: Title: 1 sentence, 1000 readers Abstract: 4 sentences, 100 readers Introduction: 1 page, 100 readers The problem: ½ a page, 10 readers The idea: 1 page, 10 readers Details: 5 pages, 3 readers Discussion: 2 pages, 10 readers Conclusions: ½ a page, 100 readers
  13. 13. Parts of an article: Title: engaging and short. Accurately reflects content. Abstract: concisely defines the problem and the merits of our ideas. Editors use this to select reviewers. Introduction: states the purpose and area of ​​the research, as well as major advances. It provides references to related work published previously. Written presentations
  14. 14. Methodology: • Gives a precise description of the points presented in the introduction, and expresses the idea before reporting the details. • It provides sufficient information to enable another researcher to replicate the experiment. • Evidence can be: theorems, measurements, case studies, analysis and comparison. Written presentations
  15. 15. Results: these show the impact of the results in comparison with recent studies. Conclusions: these summarise the most important results in comparison with recent studies. Acknowledgments References Written presentations
  16. 16. Written presentations
  17. 17. 2. Conferences
  18. 18. Types of conference presentation: • Plenary speech • Key note address • An oral presentation (15-20 minutes) • A poster (A0) Conferences
  19. 19. An oral presentation (20 minutes). A 15 minute talk followed by 5 minutes of questions. Important aspects: • Structure the presentation • Keep within time limits • Ensure clarity of presentation • Use appropriate audiovisual aids Conferences
  20. 20. Structure of the presentation: • Introduce the idea/problem (3 minutes) • Experimental (2 minutes) • Results and discussion (9 minutes) • Conclusions and acknowledgments (1 minute) Conferences
  21. 21. Audio-visual aids: • Transparencies • Colours • Font size • Beware of tics! Conferences
  22. 22. Needle coke infiltrated with pure copper Previous Results
  23. 23. •Thermal conductivity •Thermomechanical testing Material Characterisation: Molten Metal N2 Gas Exit Carbon Preform Infiltration Chamber Experimental Procedure
  24. 24. Extreme resistance materials from the space to fusion R. Prieto, M. Duarte, N. Rojo, J.M. Molina, E. Louis and J. Narciso, Materials Institute of the University of Alicante (IUMA)
  25. 25. Posters: • A lot of competition • Why should people attend my poster? • Engaging! • Identification (personal-work) Conferences
  26. 26. Jornadas Puertas Abiertas 2011 El Departamento de Química Inorgánica está formado por una plantilla de unas 80 personas de las cuales 45 son becarios que están realizando la tesis doctoral. La investigación se desarrolla en los siguientes grupos de investigación: Laboratorio de materiales avanzados Materiales carbonosos y medio ambiente Laboratorio de adhesión y adhesivos Laboratorio de nanotecnología molecular El Departamento de Química Inorgánica ha tenido un ingreso medio anual en los últimos 10 años superior al millón de euros. La investigación realizado ha generado más de 500 artículos en los últimos 5 años, y se han licenciado más de 10 patentes. Los artículos se han publicado en las revistas más prestigiosas del área, incluido Science y Nature. Y alguno de ellos ha merecido ser portada en alguna revistas. D50128 ADVENGMAT ISSN1438-1656 Vol.10–No.6 June,2008 Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Systems Laser Surface Texturing Magnesium Corrosion Steel Coatings by Electrophoreti cDeposition 20 MPa H2 adsorption Materiales biomiméticos. Materiales compuestos Materiales nanoestructurados Materiales para la producción y almacenamiento de energía. Materiales de carbón (adsorbentes, estructurales) Adhesión y adhesivos (medicina, aeronáutica, calzado) Catalizadores heterogéneos e híbridos Medio ambiente (eliminación de contaminantes, purificación) Síntesis de productos farmacéuticos, química verde. Materiales realizados en Química Inorgánica: a) Zeolita, b) Mesofase, c) Materiales compuesto, d) Catalizador e) Fibra recubierta. Sistema experimental para catálisis Planta piloto materiales compuestos Banco de pruebas de motor Almacenamiento de gases a b d e c MANUFACTURE*OF*SiC.FeSi2*COMPOSITES** FOR*NUCLEAR*APPLICATIONS Antonio Camarano, Javier Narciso, José Miguel Molina Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante. University of Alicante, aptdo. 99, 03080 Alicante, Spain Research and development of materials for fusion applications is focused on the finding of SiC-based composites with improved temperature limits and on their characterization in terms of mechanical properties, lifetime and irradiation performance. These composites offer the greatest potential for very high temperature operation among the possible candidates with low neutron activation. However, it is still required considerable further research and development to solve engineering feasibility and manufacturing issues. Issues receiving greatest attention include new fabrication methods in order to improve performance and lower fabrication costs. Reactive infiltration method is a suitable process to obtain RBSC (Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide) with a wide variety of complex shapes. After reactive infiltration, the RBSC material retains completely the shape of the infiltrated carbon preforms. The problem for the use of RBSC materials in fusion structural applications comes from the presence of remaining unreacted carbon and silicon. Free silicon has detrimental effects on mechanical properties at temperatures over 1200ºC and carbon shows lower resistance to neutrons radiation than SiC, causing severe damages on the material. To overcome this limitation silicon must be removed and carbon presence minimized on RBSC material. In this work we present a new method to produce RBSC materials in which residual carbon and silicon have been considerably reduced. For that sake carbon preforms were spontaneously infiltrated with Fe-containing Si alloys. By a proper control of the architecture of the preforms remaining carbon cannot be detected in the final materials. Residual silicon has been, as well, minimized by the formation of the metallic disilicide, FeSi2. For these new SiC-FeS2 composites we expect a considerable improvement of mechanical properties and chemical stability, in respect to the classic SiC-based materials. m EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS AND DISCUSION INTRODUCTION CONCLUSIONS Acknowledgements Financial support from ( Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (project Si pellets 99.999% Fe bar 99.95% Surface treatment 300 ºC, 1 hour (5 ºC/min) 1450 ºC, 1 hour (5 ºC/min) Ar atmosphere 100 ml/min Alloys preparation Infiltration process Graphite crucible Boron nitride application Alloy Furnace Si#5wt.%Fe+ Si#15wt.%Fe+ Si#25wt.%Fe+ Infiltration 1450 ºC, 3 hours 3 ºC/min Ar atmosphere 100 ml/min Carbon Preform Carbon Preform + Si pellets 99.999% Infiltration 1450 ºC, 1 hour 3 ºC/min Ar atmosphere 100 ml/min SiC SiC.FeSi2* COMPOSITES Characterization techniques Mercury intrusion porosimetry, Helium picnometry, Optical microscopy (OM), Thermogravimetry, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Fluorescence Three point flexural test Carbon preform characterization Si – Fe alloys characterization SiC and SiC-FeSi2 COMPOSITES characterization ρskeletal(g/cm3) ρbulk(g/cm3) P (%) Dpore (µm) 1.24 0.60-0.70 47 27.80 XRD Microstructure XRD Three point flexure test Figure 2. Optical micrographs of: a) Si -5wt.%Fe , b) Si -15wt.%Fe, c) Si -25wt.%Fe. Figure 3. a) Optical micrograph of RBSC ; and SiC-FeSi2 Composites synthetized from :b) Si -05wt.%Fe , b) Si -15wt.%Fe, c) Si -25wt.%Fe. Figure 1. X-ray diffraction patterns of Si-5wt.%Fe Figure 4. X-ray diffraction patterns of SiC-FeSi2 Composites synthetized form Si -05wt.%Fe. Figure 5. Evolution of flexure strength as a function of Fe% in RBSC and SiC-FeSi2 Composite XRF Samples Nominal XRF Si (%) Fe (%) Si (%) Fe (%) Table 1. Alloys metal content determined by XRF Table 2. SiC-FeSi2 Composites properties Sample Temperature (°C) Dwell time (h) Preform density (g/ cm3 ) Infiltration density (g/ cm3 ) Flexural stress (MPa) 1 1 RBSC / RBSC / RBSC / Microstructure RESULTS AND DISCUSION Conferences
  27. 27. Javier Narciso Romero narciso@ua.es University Professor Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry

×