German Energy Transition Workshop-Arne Jungjohann from HBF

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German Energy Transition Workshop-Arne Jungjohann from HBF

  1. 1. The German Energy Transition Amman, September 25, 2012 By Arne Jungjohann Program Director, Environment, HBF Washington DC www.boell.org Arne.Jungjohann@us.boell.org @EnergiewendeGERHeinrich Böll Foundation North America1432 K Street, NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, USA
  2. 2. Washington, DC . Mexico City . San Salvador . Rio de Janeiro . Santiago de Chile . Lagos . Cape TownNairobi . Addis Ababa . Berlin . Brussels . Warsaw . Prague . Sarajevo . Belgrade . Zagreb . IstanbulKiev . Moscow . Tbilisi . Kabul . Lahore . New Dheli . Chiang Mai . Phnom Penh . Beijing
  3. 3. Part I – The German Energy Transition Part II –Solar Power and Community Ownership Part III – OutlookThe Green Political Foundation 3
  4. 4. Germany: High investment certainty for Contribution of renewable energy sources to electricity renewable energysupply in Germany 120,000 Hydropower Wind energy EEG: January 2009 Biomass * Photovoltaics 100,000 EEG: August 2004 EEG: 80,000 April 2000 [GWh] Amendment to BauGB: 60,000 November 1997 40,000 StromEinspG: January 1991 - March 2000 20,000 0 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 * Solid and liquid biomass, biogas, sewage and landfill gas, biogenic share of waste; electricity from geothermal energy not presented due to negligible quantities produced; 1 GWh = 1 Mill. kWh; StromEinspG: Act on the Sale of Electricity to the Grid; BauGB: Construction Code; EEG: Renewable Energy Sources Act; Source: BMU-KI III 1 according to Working Group on Renewable Energy-Statistics (AGEE-Stat); image: BMU / Christoph Edelhoff; as at: December 2011; all figures provisionalThe Green Political Foundation 4
  5. 5. Germany with long-term, comprehensive climate and energy strategy Renewable share in Renewable share in Greenhouse Gas gross energy gross electricity Emissions in consumption consumption comparison to 1990% 2020 18% at least 35% minus 40% 2030 30% 50% 2040 45% 65% 2050 60% 80% minus 80%The Green Political Foundation 5
  6. 6. Fukushima nuclear accident accelerates German phase-out: by 2022 Before Fukushima: • 17 NPP operating up to 2032 • providing 22% of power (2010) • ~20 GW installed capacity After Fukushima: • Immediate shutdown of 8 NPP • providing 18% of power (2011) • gradual phase-out by 2022 of remaining 9 NPPThe Green Political Foundation 6
  7. 7. Public support and subsidies (1970-2012)The Green Political Foundation 7
  8. 8. International Perception of the “Energiewende” Coming soon www.energy-transition.deThe Green Political Foundation 8
  9. 9. Fighting climate change can be an economic strategy of industrial modernization 130% 120% 110% 100% GHG emissions in CO2-Equiv. (BY 1991=100) 90% GDP per capita (BY 1991=100) 80% 70% 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 Source: BMWI, Statistisches BundesamtThe Green Political Foundation 9
  10. 10. Economic success story: Renewable energies are a job engineThe Green Political Foundation 10
  11. 11. The Green Political Foundation 11
  12. 12. Part I – The German Energy Transition Part II – Solar Power and Community Ownership Part III – OutlookThe Green Political Foundation 12
  13. 13. Germany is the world largest solar PV marketThe Green Political Foundation 13
  14. 14. Solar PV costs decreased by 65% over last yearsThe Green Political Foundation 14
  15. 15. Driving down costs for solar PV July 2012The Green Political Foundation 15
  16. 16. The Green Political Foundation 16
  17. 17. Energy Cooperatives across the Country • By 2012 more than 800 energy coops • Advantage: Investment and risks are broadly spread, limited liability • Example Bad Neustadt: Municipality provided roof for solar pv system • Minimum participation of 2000€, ~200 citizens involved • Result: 235,000 kWh electricity and >5.5% profits per yearThe Green Political Foundation 17
  18. 18. Part I – The German Energy Transition Part II –Solar Power and Community Ownership Part III – OutlookThe Green Political Foundation 18
  19. 19. April 1, 2012: Renewables record day Solar WindThe Green Political Foundation 19
  20. 20. Renewables shave peak demand, lower prices Electricity Production in Germany: April 2012The Green Political Foundation 20
  21. 21. The Road to the Renewables Era Renewable Energies Future Grids Efficiency Source: BMUThe Green Political Foundation 21
  22. 22. Conclusion: The German Energy Transition… 1. is an ambitious, but feasible undertaking. 2. is driven by communities, citizens and small investors. 3. will provide a competitive advantage for export orientated German industry. 4. illustrates that fighting climate change and phasing out nuclear power can be two sides of the same coin. 5. is affordable for Germany, and it will likely be even more affordable for other countries.The Green Political Foundation 22
  23. 23. The good news: If this works in Germany… Source: iMaps © GeoModel SolarThe Green Political Foundation 23
  24. 24. Thank you! Arne Jungjohann Mail Arne.Jungjohann@us.boell.org Twitter @EnergiewendeGER Web http://www.boell.org/ Heinrich Böll Foundation North America 1432 K Street, NW Suite 500 Washington, DC 20005, USAThe Green Political Foundation 24
  25. 25. Energy Revolution: Wind and solar PV already close to baseload in Germany 90 80 Nov peak 80 GW 70 60 Summer peak 70 GW Target offshore 50 10 GW 40 Target onshore PV target 46 GW 52 GW 30 Baseload Wind 29 GW 20 40 GW PV 25 GW 10 0 Peak power demand Installed onshore wind, 2011/target/offshore Installed PV, 2011/target winter/summer/baseloadThe Green Political Foundation 25

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