“ The NEXT Evangelicalism” Soong-Chan Rah Milton B. Engebretson Associate Professor of Church Growth and Evangelism North ...
The Changing Face of Christianity “ Typical” Christian from 1950?
The Changing Face of Christianity “ Typical” Christian in 2010?”
Western Christianity <ul><li>“ Over the past five centuries or so, the story of Christianity has been inextricably bound u...
Shift in Global Christianity <ul><li>“ Over the past century, however, the center of gravity in the Christian world has sh...
Global Christianity <ul><li>1900 statistics: </li></ul><ul><li>Africa   2% </li></ul><ul><li>Asia   4% </li></ul><ul><li>E...
Shift in American Evangelicalism <ul><li>“ The passage of the Immigration Reform Act in 1965 increasingly looks like the m...
U.S. Census Projections <ul><li>2008: U.S. minority population about 33% </li></ul><ul><li>2023: U.S. children – 50% minor...
Christianity in America? <ul><li>Michael Spencer in  The Christian Science Monitor : “The Collapse of Evangelicalism” </li...
Denominational Trends <ul><li>Large or Growing Denominations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Baptist 64% white </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
 
 
 
Boston’s Quiet Revival <ul><li>1970: 300 churches </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Many of these churches no longer exist </li></ul><...
Boston’s Quiet Revival <ul><li>2001-2006: 98 new churches were planted </li></ul><ul><li>76 churches reported the language...
American Christianity in the  Twenty-First Century <ul><li>19 th  century Evangelicalism </li></ul><ul><li>The Great Rever...
Marginalized Christianity
Ark-itecture
Mainstreamed Christianity
Western/White Captivity of the Church <ul><li>Individualism </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual sin vs. Corporate sin </li></...
Creation of “THE OTHER” <ul><li>Orientalism  by Edward Said </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Orientalism can be discussed and analy...
“ Lawmaker suggests Asian-descendant voters should adopt names &quot;easier for Americans to deal with&quot; <ul><li>Durin...
 
Wax on, wax off, get your rickshaw ready Swervin', curvin', hold your rickshaw steady
 
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Soong-Chan Rah - The Next Evangelicalism

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The future is now. Philip Jenkins has chronicled how the next Christendom has shifted away from the Western church toward the global South and East. Likewise, changing demographics mean that North American society will accelerate its diversity in terms of race, ethnicity and culture. But evangelicalism has long been held captive by its predominantly white cultural identity and history.

Professor and pastor Soong-Chan Rah calls the North American church to escape its captivity to Western cultural trappings and to embrace a new evangelicalism that is diverse and multiethnic. Rah brings keen analysis to the limitations of American Christianity and shows how captivity to Western individualism and materialism has played itself out in megachurches and emergent churches alike. Many white churches are in crisis and ill-equipped to minister to new cultural realities, but immigrant, ethnic and multiethnic churches are succeeding and flourishing.

This prophetic report casts a vision for a dynamic evangelicalism that fully embodies the cultural realities of the twenty-first century. Spiritual renewal is happening within the North American church, from corners and margins not always noticed by those in the center. Come, discover the vitality of the next evangelicalism.

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Soong-Chan Rah - The Next Evangelicalism

  1. 1. “ The NEXT Evangelicalism” Soong-Chan Rah Milton B. Engebretson Associate Professor of Church Growth and Evangelism North Park Theological Seminary [email_address] www.profrah.com
  2. 2. The Changing Face of Christianity “ Typical” Christian from 1950?
  3. 3. The Changing Face of Christianity “ Typical” Christian in 2010?”
  4. 4. Western Christianity <ul><li>“ Over the past five centuries or so, the story of Christianity has been inextricably bound up with that of Europe and . . . North America. Until recently, the overwhelming majority of Christians have lived in White nations, allowing theorists to speak of a . . . ‘European Christian’ civilization.” </li></ul><ul><li>The Next Christendom </li></ul><ul><li>Philip Jenkins </li></ul>
  5. 5. Shift in Global Christianity <ul><li>“ Over the past century, however, the center of gravity in the Christian world has shifted inexorably southward to Africa, Asia, and Latin America. . . . Christianity should enjoy a worldwide boom in the new century, but the vast majority of believers will be neither white nor European, nor Euro-American.” </li></ul><ul><li>The Next Christendom </li></ul><ul><li>Philip Jenkins </li></ul>
  6. 6. Global Christianity <ul><li>1900 statistics: </li></ul><ul><li>Africa 2% </li></ul><ul><li>Asia 4% </li></ul><ul><li>Europe 68% </li></ul><ul><li>Lat. Am. 11% </li></ul><ul><li>N. Am. 14% </li></ul><ul><li>Oceana 1% </li></ul>“ White”: 83% “ Non-white”: 16% “ White”: 40% “ Non-white”: 60% “ White”: 29% “ Non-white”: 71% 2005 statistics: Africa 19% Asia 17% Europe 26% Lat. Am. 24% N. Am. 13% Oceana 1% 2050 statistics: Africa 29% Asia 20% Europe 16% Lat. Am. 22% N. Am. 12% Oceana 1%
  7. 7. Shift in American Evangelicalism <ul><li>“ The passage of the Immigration Reform Act in 1965 increasingly looks like the most significant single event of that much-balleyhooed decade.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ [The U.S.’s] ethnic character will become less European and less White, with all that implies for religious and cultural patterns.” </li></ul><ul><li>Jenkins </li></ul>
  8. 8. U.S. Census Projections <ul><li>2008: U.S. minority population about 33% </li></ul><ul><li>2023: U.S. children – 50% minorities </li></ul><ul><li>2042: U.S. minority population more than 50% </li></ul>
  9. 9. Christianity in America? <ul><li>Michael Spencer in The Christian Science Monitor : “The Collapse of Evangelicalism” </li></ul><ul><li>Jon Meacham in Newsweek : “The End of Christian America” </li></ul><ul><li>PEW and ARIS reports </li></ul>
  10. 10. Denominational Trends <ul><li>Large or Growing Denominations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Baptist 64% white </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pentecostal 58% white </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Smaller or Declining Denominations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lutheran 96% white </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Congregational/UCC 89% white </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Episcopalian/Anglican 89% white </li></ul></ul>
  11. 14. Boston’s Quiet Revival <ul><li>1970: 300 churches </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Many of these churches no longer exist </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Current estimate: over 600 </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Mostly in the ethnic, immigrant communities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Over half of those churches hold services in a language other than English </li></ul></ul></ul>
  12. 15. Boston’s Quiet Revival <ul><li>2001-2006: 98 new churches were planted </li></ul><ul><li>76 churches reported the language of worship </li></ul><ul><ul><li>50% of those churches worship in a language other than English </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many churches with significant non-white population but with services in English </li></ul></ul>
  13. 16. American Christianity in the Twenty-First Century <ul><li>19 th century Evangelicalism </li></ul><ul><li>The Great Reversal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scopes Trial </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fundamentalist / Modernist controversy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creation of a Christian sub-culture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>White Flight (Christians to the suburbs) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Marginalized Christianity </li></ul><ul><li>Mainstreamed Christianity </li></ul>
  14. 17. Marginalized Christianity
  15. 18. Ark-itecture
  16. 19. Mainstreamed Christianity
  17. 20. Western/White Captivity of the Church <ul><li>Individualism </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual sin vs. Corporate sin </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal faith/salvation vs. Corporate faith </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Materialism / Consumerism </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reducing relationships to a market exchange </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How do churches measure success? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Racism </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Social construct of race </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>America’s original sin </li></ul></ul>
  18. 21. Creation of “THE OTHER” <ul><li>Orientalism by Edward Said </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Orientalism can be discussed and analyzed as the corporate institution for dealing with the Orient – dealing with it by making statements about it, authorizing views of it, describing it, by teaching it, settling it, ruling over it: in short, Orientalism as a Western style of dominating, restructuring, and having authority over the Orient.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ European culture gained in strength and identity by setting itself off against the Orient as a sort of surrogate and even underground self” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Creation of “THE OTHER” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>you are different from us / you are not like us </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>we will marginalize you </li></ul></ul>
  19. 22. “ Lawmaker suggests Asian-descendant voters should adopt names &quot;easier for Americans to deal with&quot; <ul><li>During public hearings on the voter identification legislation in the House, state Rep. Betty Brown, R-Terrell, suggested that Asian-Americans might want to adopt names that are &quot; easier for Americans to deal with &quot; when they want to vote so their names will match what is on registration rolls. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Do you think that it would behoove you and your citizens to adopt a name that we could deal with more readily here?&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Brown later tells Ko: &quot;Can't you see that this is something that would make it a lot easier for you and the people who are poll workers if you could adopt a name just for identification purposes that's easier for Americans to deal with ?&quot; </li></ul>
  20. 24. Wax on, wax off, get your rickshaw ready Swervin', curvin', hold your rickshaw steady

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